Green jobs

  • Antuän / Flickr
  • Curt Carnemark / World Bank
  • Yann Gar/Flickr
  • Danilo Pinzon / World Bank
  • Tran Thi Hoa / World Bank
  • Graham Crouch / World Bank
  • Wu Zhiyi / World Bank
  • Danilo Pinzon / World Bank
Green jobs are central to sustainable development and respond to the global challenges of environmental protection, economic development and social inclusion. By engaging governments, workers and employers as active agents of change, the ILO promotes the greening of enterprises, workplace practices and the labour market as a whole. These efforts create decent employment opportunities, enhance resource efficiency and build low-carbon sustainable societies.

Latest

  1. Full report

    Preparing for the future of work: National policy responses in ASEAN +6

    11 September 2019

    Spurred by technological advancements, demographic shifts and environmental and climate disruptions, fastpaced transformations are affecting how, where and when people work, impacting our labour markets and shaping the future of work. Preparing for the future of work: National policy responses in ASEAN +6 provides an overview of how countries in the Asia-Pacific region are reacting to such changes with new or adapted strategies and policies.

  2. Our impact, their voices

    A greener life is a rosier one, thanks to mushrooms

    04 September 2019

    The UN Climate Action Summit (23 September) will consider the social and economic consequences of moving to a more sustainable economy. Without proper planning millions of livelihoods – particularly of poor and vulnerable workers – are threatened. An ILO project in Bangladesh has shown that the right policies can protect the environment, improve workers’ lives and promote a greener economy.

Highlight

  1. World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with Jobs

    24 million jobs to open up in the green economy

  • The role the ILO must take up is to promote the considerable potential for creation of decent work associated with the transition to a low-carbon sustainable development path and to minimize and manage the inevitable dislocation that will accompany it."

    Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General