Green jobs

  • Antuän / Flickr
  • Curt Carnemark / World Bank
  • Yann Gar/Flickr
  • Danilo Pinzon / World Bank
  • Tran Thi Hoa / World Bank
  • Graham Crouch / World Bank
  • Wu Zhiyi / World Bank
  • Danilo Pinzon / World Bank
Green jobs are central to sustainable development and respond to the global challenges of environmental protection, economic development and social inclusion. By engaging governments, workers and employers as active agents of change, the ILO promotes the greening of enterprises, workplace practices and the labour market as a whole. These efforts create decent employment opportunities, enhance resource efficiency and build low-carbon sustainable societies. Meet the ILO Green Jobs Global Team

Latest

  1. © hans-johnson 2020

    Greening the transport sector

    Greening the transport sector in the post COVID-19 recovery could create up to 15 million jobs worldwide

    19 May 2020

    Investment in transforming the transport sector could create millions of new jobs and help countries move to greener, healthier economies, says report from the International Labour Organization and the UN Economic Commission for Europe.

  2. Article

    Moving towards 100% renewable power in Hawaii (with a little help from sheep)

    12 May 2020

    The US island state of Hawaii has committed to generating 100 per cent of its power using renewable energy by 2045, demonstrating to other US states and island communities across the world, that sustainable energy can be a reality. UN News and the ILO traveled to Hawaii to talk to a power company executive and a sheep farmer to find out how they are contributing to that goal.

Highlight

  1. World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with Jobs

    24 million jobs to open up in the green economy

  • The role the ILO must take up is to promote the considerable potential for creation of decent work associated with the transition to a low-carbon sustainable development path and to minimize and manage the inevitable dislocation that will accompany it."

    Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General