Women in business and management: Gaining momentum in Latin America and the Caribbean

Report published by the ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities (ACT/EMP) launched at a regional conference in May 2017

News | 16 October 2017
Women in Latin America and the Caribbean, where only 4.2 per cent of CEOs are female, have still made substantial progress in taking business and management positions and are increasingly driving economic growth. This, according to the report titled ‘Women in business and management: Gaining momentum in Latin America and the Caribbean’, by the ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities (ACT/EMP) and launched at a regional conference in May 2017.
 
The report reveals that Latin America and the Caribbean is set to become a global leader in gender diversity in business and management with an increasing number of skilled women professionals. The women’s labour force participation rate in the region increased from 48.5 per cent in 2006 to 49.7 per cent in 2016 – in stark contrast with the decline of the global rate during the same period. The report provides clear evidence that more women in the region have made their way in the world of work.

The report also shows that the number of women tertiary graduates exceeds that of men in all countries in the region where data is available. Today, many more women are occupying professional, middle and senior managerial positions.

In most countries in the region, over 30 per cent of all managers are women, and in 19 countries they represent 40 per cent or more of managers, on par with the most developed nations in Europe and North America. With 59 per cent of all managers being women, Jamaica has the highest proportion of women managers, not only in the region, but in the world, followed by Belize, the Cayman Islands and Colombia with 50 per cent or more.