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ILO-en-strap

GB.276/LILS/6
276th Session
Geneva, November 1999


Committee on Legal Issues and International Labour Standards

LILS


SIXTH ITEM ON THE AGENDA

Ratification and promotion of fundamental ILO Conventions

Contents

Introduction

I. Technical assistance provided by the ILO as part of the campaign to promote ratification of the fundamental Conventions
(October 1998-October 1999)

II. Campaign to promote ratification of Convention No. 182

Prospects of ratification of Convention No. 182

Annex I. Ratifications since the launch of the campaign of ratification of the fundamental Conventions
(25 May 1995-8 October 1999)

Annex II. Technical assistance provided by the ILO to member States for the promotion and ratification of the ILO's fundamental Conventions
(October 1998-October 1999)


Introduction

1. On 25 May 1995, following the World Summit for Social Development which took place in Copenhagen in March of that year, in the light of the evident consensus in favour of more intensive promotion of fundamental human rights at work, the Director-General launched a campaign for universal ratification of the seven ILO Conventions that are regarded as fundamental, namely the forced labour Conventions (Nos. 29 and 105), the freedom of association and collective bargaining Conventions (Nos. 87 and 98), the non-discrimination Conventions (Nos. 100 and 111), and the minimum age Convention (No. 138). Since then, the Office has reported in March every year to the Governing Body on ratifications and prospects of ratification of these instruments on the basis of information provided every year by the governments of the member States concerned.(1)  Apart from the March document on prospects of ratification of the fundamental Conventions, the Director-General every year since 1997 has submitted a paper to the November session of the Governing Body on technical assistance provided by the ILO to its constituents as part of the campaign to promote ratification of the fundamental Conventions.(2)  This is the purpose of the first part of the present paper.

2. Since the publication in November 1998 of the previous document on the technical assistance provided by the ILO to member States in connection with the ratification of the fundamental ILO Conventions, the 87th Session of the International Labour Conference has adopted (in June 1999) two new instruments with a view to bringing about the abolition of child labour, in particular its most extreme forms. They are the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention (No. 182) and Recommendation (No. 190). Following the adoption of these instruments, the Director-General launched a global campaign for universal ratification of the new Convention -- ratification being necessary to allow the ILO's member States to give effect to it in national legislation and practice -- and accordingly wrote to Heads of State inviting them to ratify the new instrument as soon as possible. As it was always assumed that the new Convention would eventually be included in the category of fundamental Conventions, the second part of this document will examine the implementation of the campaign for the ratification of the new Convention.

I. Technical assistance provided by the ILO
as part of the campaign to promote ratification
of the fundamental Conventions
(October 1998-October 1999)

3. The ILO has registered 46 new ratifications of fundamental Conventions since the 273rd Session (November 1998) of the Governing Body. Convention No. 29 has been ratified by Oman, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Turkey; Convention No. 87 has been ratified by Cambodia, Cape Verde, Chile and Georgia; Convention No. 98 by Cambodia, Chile, Georgia and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; Convention No. 100 by Belize, Cambodia, Ethiopia and Thailand; Convention No. 105 by Bahrain, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Chile, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Togo; Convention No. 111 by Belize, Cambodia, Indonesia, Ireland, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, United Kingdom and Zimbabwe; Convention No. 138 by Burkina Faso, China, Chile, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Ethiopia, Hungary, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Portugal, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania and Turkey. The full list of ratifications registered since the start of the campaign is reproduced in Annex I. In addition, the Director-General registered the first ratification of the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention (No. 182) (see paragraphs 6-7 below). These ratifications bring to 141 the number of ratifications of fundamental Conventions that have taken place since the beginning of the campaign in May 1995. Bulgaria, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Ethiopia, Georgia, Indonesia, Ireland, Switzerland and Togo have joined the list of countries that have ratified all of the original seven fundamental Conventions, bringing the total number of those countries to 52.(3) 

4. As the previous documents indicate, an examination of the technical assistance provided by the ILO and/or requested by the constituents shows that this assistance generally takes one of two forms: (a) legal assistance or technical advisory services. This essentially means replying to requests for clarification of certain provisions of a given fundamental Convention;(4)  giving an unofficial opinion(5)  as to whether or not a legislative provision complies with a particular Convention, or formulating observations on draft legislation or amendments to legislation; drafting labour codes;(6)  providing information for governments on the correct procedure for registering a Convention; and other measures; and (b) the promotion of the fundamental Conventions. This involves organizing or participating in meetings on the fundamental Conventions and/or international labour standards in general; establishing contacts during missions or with delegations during the International Labour Conference; training officials or representatives of employers' or workers' organizations; disseminating information to civil servants working for labour ministers, legislators, the social partners and the general public; and other measures. Certain countries are also eligible for assistance under direct action programmes or technical cooperation projects which are intended, among other things, to help them gradually overcome any obstacles to ratification and implement certain fundamental Conventions effectively. Examples include the International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC)(7)  and the project INT/94/MO4/DAN currently under way in the United Republic of Tanzania concerning the promotion of the employment of women and the revision of labour legislation with a view to incorporating the gender dimension. One of the Programme's medium-term objectives is the ratification and implementation of Conventions Nos. 101 and 111. Another example is the project now under way in the countries that come under the remit of the San Josť multidisciplinary team.(8)  The purpose of this project is to publish a series of pamphlets explaining the content of the ILO's fundamental Conventions to persons of limited education, i.e. in language that is as simple and clear as possible.

5. The information received this year shows that the multidisciplinary teams in the field, working closely with headquarters units (International Labour Standards Department, Industrial Relations and Labour Administration Department, Bureau for Employers' Activities, Bureau for Workers' Activities, IPEC, etc.) have continued to promote the ratification and application of the fundamental ILO Conventions by responding to the many requests for assistance made by the Organization's various constituents and also by taking the initiative in proposing specific assistance to constituents in overcoming specific obstacles. In this regard, it is interesting to note that the promotion of the fundamental Conventions in practice now goes hand in hand with the promotion of the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Mission reports by members of the multidisciplinary teams are very instructive in this respect: since the adoption of the Declaration in June 1998, an item on the Declaration has been included in virtually all meetings (seminars, workshops, symposia, conferences, etc.) concerning international labour standards or involving ILO officials. Conversely, promoting the Declaration can be synonymous with promoting the ratification and application of the fundamental Conventions. For example, during meetings organized for the purpose of presenting the Declaration, ILO officials have noted that discussions often go beyond the specific obligations which ensue from it. Discussions always turn towards the actual content of the fundamental Conventions, and participants often conclude the discussions with recommendations to ratifiy fundamental Conventions which have not yet been ratified by their countries. Lastly, still in the context of the Declaration, it has been noted that there is high demand from governments for the Office's assistance in producing their first annual follow-up reports on Conventions which have not been ratified.(9)  The table reproduced in Annex II summarizes the technical assistance given by the Office to member States and to its other constituents since October 1998.

II. Campaign to promote ratification
of Convention No. 182

6. Once this new instrument had been adopted unanimously on 17 June 1999, the Director-General informed the Conference that he would be launching a global campaign for the ratification of Convention No. 182 in order to ensure that the principles enshrined in that instrument would be incorporated rapidly into the legislation and practice of all the ILO's member States. The Director-General is pleased to inform the Committee that the ILO registered the first ratification of the Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention on 28 September 1999, when the Seychelles became the first country to ratify that instrument. In the light of the information received daily from ILO representatives in the field, the Director-General is confident that the Office will register new ratifications by the end of the year.

Prospects of ratification of Convention No. 182

7. According to information available to the ILO, the process of ratification of the new Convention is already under way in many countries. Certain countries are at the preliminary consultation stage;(10)  in other countries, the Council of Ministers has approved draft legislation authorizing the President to ratify the Convention (Senegal), or presidential approval has already been obtained and the ILO should receive the instrument of ratification in the near future (Malawi). In addition, the assembly of Heads of State and Government participating in the 35th Session (12-14 July 1999) of the Organization of African Unity adopted a resolution calling on all members to ratify the new ILO Convention before its next session in the year 2000. ILO member States from the Americas also committed themselves during the XIVth American Regional Meeting (24-27 August 1999) to promote ratification of Convention No. 182 as quickly as possible, preferably before the first session of the International Labour Conference of the new millennium (in June 2000) and, with the ILO's assistance, to implement programmes to attain the Convention's stated objectives.

Promotion activities initiated by the Office

8. According to article 19, paragraph 4, of the ILO Constitution, when the Conference adopts new instruments the Director-General is required to communicate a certified copy of those instruments to each Member for submission to the competent authorities, in accordance with article 19, paragraph 5. In practice, it is the Director of the International Labour Standards Department (NORMES) who sends out these instruments to Members for submission to their competent authorities. In the case of Convention No. 182 and Recommendation No. 190, the Director-General thought it important to communicate personally the certified copies of these instruments to each of the Heads of State of the Organization's Members inviting them to ratify Convention No. 182 as soon as possible. In accordance with the established procedure, the secretariat of NORMES subsequently sent the authentic text of both instruments to the government authorities (labour and/or foreign affairs ministers, depending on the country) for submission to the competent authorities.

9. Since the launch of the campaign for universal ratification of Convention No. 182, all the units involved have been mobilized. The Director-General is thus using every available opportunity to publicize the new instrument and promote its ratification.(11)  On 1 July 1999, the Executive Director of the Standards and Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work Sector(12)  sent a circular to all regional directors, directors of external offices and multidisciplinary teams and all national correspondents in order: (a) to inform them of the creation of a team in Geneva responsible for coordinating the campaign launched by the Director-General following the adoption of Convention No. 182; (b) to ask them to supply information on the prospects of ratification of the Convention in their geographic area; (c) to ask them to consider ways and means of incorporating the new campaign into their activities, and to indicate what form of technical cooperation they intended to provide for their constituents and to what extent headquarters might help them; and (d) to identify the opinion makers, apart from the traditional constituents, who might take up the ILO's campaign for ratification of Convention No. 182, as well as meetings and/or events in which the ILO might participate in order to promote the Convention.(13) 

10. As regards ILO headquarters: (a) a campaign coordination team has been set up; (b) IPEC and NORMES have been asked to produce a user-friendly guide in the Organization's three working languages, explaining the content of the Convention based on the information kit on the draft Convention which was distributed for the June 1999 session of the Conference. The guide will be available from mid-October onwards in the three working languages; (c) similarly, it has been decided to improve the ILO's website in order to allow the general public to access information online in several languages on the contents of the Convention and the progress made in the promotion and ratification campaign; (d) it is also envisaged that the Office in the medium term will develop a wide range of promotional tools: posters, postage stamps, tee-shirts, audiovisual products, brochures, articles in specialist reviews, etc.

11. Information from the field indicates that directors of the Organization's external offices and multidisciplinary teams are already active in the campaign. Most have already written to all the governments in their geographical areas, sending copies to the social partners: (a) informing them of the campaign for universal ratification of Convention No. 182, (b) asking about the prospects of ratification of the instrument in their countries and any obstacles to ratification, and (c) reminding them that the ILO is prepared to give assistance in overcoming any such obstacles. It is interesting to note that they do not simply wait for countries to request assistance but take the initiative. Since the adoption of the new Convention, standards specialists in the multidisciplinary teams as well as officials from NORMES on mission in the field have been seizing every available opportunity to explain the Convention to their dialogue partners.(14) 

Promotion initiated by member States

12. Although the Convention was adopted only recently, some countries(15)  have already asked the ILO to organize national seminars on Convention No. 182 and often on Convention No. 138 as well; others have launched campaigns to promote ratification of Convention No. 182 or are preparing to do so;(16)  others have asked the ILO to provide assistance in translating Convention No. 182 and Recommendation No. 190 into their languages;(17)  others such as Sri Lanka have decided to set up a task force to consider possible ways and means of ensuring that the fundamental rights of all children are respected.

13. This document gives no more than a selective overview of the assistance provided every day by the Office to its constituents as part of the ratification campaign, in that it focuses exclusively on the technical assistance provided by the ILO with a view to achieving universal ratification of the fundamental Conventions. Nevertheless, it provides a useful picture of the way in which the Office provides assistance to member States as part of this campaign. The steady flow of ratifications of fundamental Conventions registered to date illustrates the effectiveness of the ILO's assistance to its constituents in this area.

Geneva, 14 October 1999.


1. This information is given in response to the circular letter sent out by the Director-General in November every year to member States that have not ratified all seven fundamental Conventions, asking about the prospects of ratification of the fundamental Conventions which they have not yet ratified and reminding them that the ILO can provide assistance in overcoming obstacles to ratification.

2. See documents GB.270/LILS/5 and GB.273/LILS/5.

3. Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Botswana, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Niger, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia.

4. For example Estonia, with regard to Conventions Nos. 111 and 138; or Sri Lanka with regard to Conventions Nos. 105 and 138.

5. Unofficial opinions of the ILO: governments that have doubts regarding the meaning of particular provisions in an international labour Convention or Recommendation can request the Office's opinion. While always making it quite clear that it has no special competence to interpret international labour Conventions or Recommendations -- the International Court of Justice, under the terms of article 37, paragraph 1, of the ILO Constitution, being considered the sole body competent to give authorized interpretations of these instruments -- the Office provides assistance to governments requesting an opinion. It also tries to help employers' and workers' organizations in the same way. If a formal or unofficial opinion is requested, or if the issue raised is considered to be of general interest, the opinion is set out in an ILO Memorandum published in the Official Bulletin. In cases where a formal or official opinion is not expressly requested, the ILO normally replies with a simple letter.

6. For example, South Africa asked the ILO to provide assistance in revising its labour legislation.

7. It will be recalled that the objective of this Programme is to help to bring about the gradual abolition of child labour by enhancing the capacity of countries to tackle the problem and creating a worldwide movement to combat it. The priority target groups among working children are: children in a state of servitude, children employed in dangerous conditions and sectors, and particularly vulnerable children, that is children below the age of 12 and girls.

8. Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama.

9. The purpose of the annual follow-up is to provide an opportunity every year, by means of a simplified procedure which will take the place of the four-yearly procedure established by the Governing Body in 1995, to review the efforts made in accordance with the Declaration by Members who have not yet ratified all the fundamental Conventions. The follow-up will cover, each year, one of the four categories of fundamental principles and rights referred to in the Declaration. It will be based on the reports requested from Members under article 19, paragraph 5(e), of the Constitution.

10. For example, Argentina, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Indonesia, Islamic Republic of Iran, Ireland, Japan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Tunisia, United States.

11. For example, he took advantage of the opening session (5 July 1999) of the high-level segment of the substantive session of the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) to invite multilateral organizations and citizens of all countries to participate in the global campaign for the elimination of the worst forms of child labour.

12. This sector comprises the International Labour Standards Department and two InFocus programmes on the Declaration and on child labour (IPEC).

13. For example, the ILO used the Commemorative Meeting on "Achievements and Challenges" (30 September-1 October 1999), organized by the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, to recall the unanimous adoption by the International Labour Conference of the ILO Convention on the worst forms of child labour on 17 June 1999 and to express the hope that the greatest possible number of States would ratify that Convention. Another example was the proposal from the International Commission of Jurists to the ILO to participate in a series of conferences which it plans to organize in Asia in order to present the new ILO Convention to jurists and judges.

14. For example, the contents of Convention No. 182 and Recommendation No. 190 were presented and explained to participants in the National Tripartite Seminar on international labour standards which took place in Windhoek from 14 to 18 September 1999, and to officials from the Ministry of National Planning during a mission to Fiji (13-17 July 1999).

15. For example, Republic of Korea, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand.

16. For example, Ethiopia, Italy, Malawi, Mozambique, Thailand, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

17. For example, Azerbaijan, Cambodia, Republic of Korea, Islamic Republic of Iran, Italy, Malaysia, Nepal, Poland, Russian Federation, Thailand, Tunisia.


Annex I

Ratifications since the launch of the campaign of
ratification of the fundamental Conventions
(25 May 1995-8 October 1999)

I. Forced Labour Convention, 1930 (No. 29)

Botswana
El Salvador
Estonia
Georgia
Oman
Qatar
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

South Africa
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Turkey
Turkmenistan
Uruguay
Uzbekistan
Zimbabwe

II. Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organise Convention, 1948 (No. 87)

Botswana
Cambodia
Cape Verde
Chile
Georgia
Indonesia
Moldova, Republic of

Mozambique
South Africa
Sri Lanka
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Turkmenistan
Zambia

III. Right to Organise and Collective Bargaining Convention, 1949 (No. 98)

Botswana
Burundi
Cambodia
Chile
Georgia
Madagascar
Moldova, Republic of
Mozambique
Nepal

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
South Africa
Suriname
Switzerland
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Zambia
Zimbabwe

IV. Equal Remuneration Convention, 1951 (No. 100)

Bangladesh
Belize
Botswana
Cambodia
Estonia
Ethiopia
Georgia
Korea, Republic of
Lesotho

Malaysia
Nepal
Thailand
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Trinidad and Tobago
Turkmenistan
United Arab Emirates
Uzbekistan
Viet Nam

V. Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, 1957 (No. 105)

Albania
Bahrain
Belarus
Botswana
Bulgaria
Burkina Faso
Cambodia
Chile
Croatia
Czech Republic
Estonia
Ethiopia
Georgia
Indonesia

Kyrgyzstan
Mauritania
Romania
Russian Federation
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Slovakia
Slovenia
South Africa
Togo
Turkmenistan
United Arab Emirates
Uzbekistan
Zimbabwe

VI. Discrimination (Employment and Occupation) Convention, 1958 (No. 111)

Albania
Belize
Botswana
Cambodia
El Salvador
Georgia
Indonesia
Ireland
Korea, Republic of
Lesotho

Moldova, Republic of
South Africa
Sri Lanka
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Turkmenistan
United Kingdom
Uzbekistan
Viet Nam
Zimbabwe

VII. Minimum Age Convention, 1973 (No. 138)

Albania
Argentina
Bolivia
Botswana
Burkina Faso
Chile
China
Cyprus
Denmark
Dominican Republic
Egypt
Ethiopia
Georgia
Guyana
Hungary
Indonesia

Jordan
Korea, Republic of
Lithuania
Malaysia
Nepal
Philippines
Portugal
San Marino
Slovakia
Switzerland
Tanzania, United Republic of
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Tunisia
Turkey
United Arab Emirates

VIII. Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182)

Seychelles


Annex II

Technical assistance provided by the ILO
to member States
(1) for the promotion and
ratification of the ILO's fundamental Conventions
(October 1998-October 1999)

No. 29   --
No. 87   --
No. 98   --
No. 100 --
No. 105 --
No. 111 --
No. 138 --
No. 182 --

Forced Labour Convention, 1930
Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organise Convention, 1948
Right to Organise and Collective Bargaining Convention, 1949
Equal Remuneration Convention, 1951
Abolition of Forced Labour Convention, 1957
Discrimination (Employment and Occupation) Convention, 1958
Minimum Age Convention, 1973
Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182)

Explanation of symbols in the table

IPEC
INT/94/MO4/DAN
NAM/96/03M/NOR

International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour
Review of legislation with a view to incorporating the gender dimension
Assistance to the Government in adopting a law on equality in employment

 


1. The following countries are not included in the table, since they had already ratified the seven fundamental Conventions when the previous document was published (October 1998): Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Botswana, Cyprus, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Denmark, Dominica, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Israel, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Niger, Norway, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Tunisia, Uruguay, Venezuela and Zambia. This does not, however, imply that they have not received technical assistance from the ILO, but simply that any technical assistance provided by the Office was aimed primarily at achieving effective implementation of ratified Conventions.

 


Country
(French alphabetical order)

Technical assistance

Ratifications registered since November 1998

Fundamental Conventions that have not been ratified


Legal assistance

Promotion
Information
Training

Technical cooperation


Afghanistan

C. 29, 87, 98
C. 138 -- no statement

South Africa

X

IPEC

C. 100, 138

Angola

C. 87, 138

Antigua and Barbuda

X

C. 100

Saudi Arabia

X

C. 87, 98, 138

Armenia

X

C. 29, 87, 98, 105, 138

Australia

C. 138

Austria

C. 138

Azerbaijan

X

X

C. 105

Bahamas

X

C. 87, 100, 111, 138

Bahrain

X

C. 87, 98, 100, 111, 138

Bangladesh

X

X

IPEC

C. 138

Barbados

X

C. 138

Belize

X

C. 100, 111

C.138

Benin

IPEC

C. 138

Bolivia

IPEC

C. 29

Bosnia and Herzegovina

X

C. 105

Brazil

X

X

IPEC

C. 87, 138

Bulgaria

X

C. 105*

--

Burkina Faso

IPEC

C. 138*

--

Burundi

IPEC

C. 138

Cambodia

X

X

IPEC

C. 87, 98, 100, 105, 111

C. 138 -- no statement

Cameroon

X

IPEC

C. 138

Canada

C. 29, 98, 138

Cape Verde

C. 87

C. 138

Central African Republic

C. 138

Chile

X

X

IPEC

C. 87, 98, 105, 138*

--

China

X

IPEC

C. 138

C. 29, 87, 98, 105, 111

Colombia

IPEC

C. 138

Comoros

C. 111, 138

Congo

C. 98, 100, 105, 111 -- ratifications announced but originals not received by the ILO;
C. 138 -- no statement

Korea, Republic of

X

C. 111, 138

C. 29, 87, 98, 105

Côte d'Ivoire

C. 138

Democratic Republic of the Congo

C. 87, 105, 111, 138

Djibouti

C. 111, 138

Dominican Republic

IPEC

C. 138*

--

Egypt

X

X

IPEC

C. 138*

--

El Salvador

IPEC

C. 87, 98, 100

United Arab Emirates

X

C. 138

C. 87, 98, 111

Ecuador

IPEC

C. 138

Eritrea

X

C. 29, 87, 98, 100, 105, 111, 138

Estonia

X

X

C. 111, 138

United States

C. 29, 87, 98, 100, 111, 138

Ethiopia

X

X

IPEC

C. 100, 105, 138

C. 29

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

X

C. 105

Fiji

X

X

C. 87, 100, 111, 138

Gabon

X

IPEC

C. 138

Gambia

C. 29, 87, 98, 100, 105, 111, 138

Georgia

X

X

IPEC

C. 87*

--

Ghana

X

C. 138

Grenada

X

C. 111, 138

Guinea

IPEC

C. 138

Guinea-Bissau

C. 87, 138

Equatorial Guinea

IPEC

C. 29, 87, 98, 105, 111

Haiti

IPEC

C. 138

Hungary

X

C. 138*

--

Solomon Islands

X

C. 87, 98, 100, 105, 111, 138

India

X

X

IPEC

C. 87, 98, 105, 138

Indonesia

X

X

IPEC

C. 105, 111, 138*

--

Iran, Islamic Republic of

X

X

C. 87, 98, 138

Iraq

C. 87

Ireland

C. 111*

Iceland

C. 138

Jamaica

X

C. 138

Japan

X

C. 105, 111, 138

Jordan

X

IPEC

C. 87

Kazakhstan

X

X

C. 29, 87, 98, 100, 105, 111, 138

Kenya

X

X

IPEC

C. 87, 100, 111

Kyrgyzstan

X

X

IPEC

C. 105*

--

Kuwait

X

C. 98, 100, 138

Lao People's Democratic Republic

X

IPEC

C. 87, 98, 100, 105, 111, 138

Lesotho

C. 105, 138

Latvia

X

C. 29, 138

Lebanon

IPEC

C. 87, 138

Liberia

C. 100, 138

Libyan Arab Jamahiriya

C. 87

Luxembourg

C. 111

Madagascar

IPEC

C. 105, 138

Malaysia

X

C. 87, 105, 111

Malawi

X

IPEC

C. 29, 87, 105, 138

Mali

IPEC

C. 138

Morocco

X

X

IPEC

C. 87, 138

Mauritius

X

C. 87, 100, 111

Mauritania

C. 98, 100, 138

Mexico

IPEC

C. 98, 138

Moldova, Republic of

X

C. 29, 100, 138

Mongolia

X

IPEC

C. 29, 105, 138

Mozambique

X

C. 29, 138

Myanmar

X

C. 98, 100, 105, 111, 138

Namibia

X

NAM/96/03M/NOR

C. 29, 100, 105, 111, 138

Nepal

X

X

IPEC

C. 29, 87, 105

Nigeria

C. 111, 138

New Zealand

C. 87, 98, 138

Oman

X

C. 29

C. 87, 98, 100, 105, 111, 138

Uganda

X

X

IPEC

C. 87, 100, 111, 138

Uzbekistan

X

C. 87, 138

Pakistan

X

X

IPEC

C. 100, 138

Panama

IPEC

C. 138

Papua New Guinea

X

X

C. 87, 100, 111, 138

Paraguay

X

IPEC

C. 138

Peru

X

IPEC

C. 138

Philippines

X

IPEC

C. 29

Portugal

C. 138*

--

Qatar

X

C. 87, 98, 100, 105, 138

United Kingdom

C. 111

C. 138

Rwanda

IPEC

C. 29

Saint Kitts and Nevis

X

C. 29, 87, 98, 100, 105, 111, 138

Saint Lucia

X

C. 138

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

X

X

C. 87, 100, 111, 138

Sao Tome and Principe

C. 29, 105;
C. 138 -- no statement

Senegal

X

X

IPEC

C. 138 -- no statement

Seychelles

X

C. 98, 100, 111, 138

Sierra Leone

C. 138

Singapore

X

C. 87, 100, 105, 111, 138

Somalia

C. 87, 98, 100, 138

Sudan

C. 87, 138

Sri Lanka

X

X

IPEC

C. 111

C. 105, 138

Switzerland

C. 98, 138*

--

Suriname

X

C. 100, 111

Swaziland

C. 138

Syrian Arab Republic

X

IPEC

C. 138

Tajikistan

X

C. 105*

--

Tanzania, United Republic of

X

X

IPEC, INT/94/ M04/DAN

C. 138

C. 87, 100, 111

Chad

IPEC

C. 138

Czech Republic

X

C. 138

Thailand

X

X

IPEC

C. 100

C. 87, 98, 111, 138

Togo

IPEC

C. 105*

--

Trinidad and Tobago

X

C. 138

Turkmenistan

X

C. 138 -- no statement

Turkey

IPEC

C. 29, 138*

--

Ukraine

X

IPEC

C. 105

Viet Nam

IPEC

C. 29, 87, 98, 105, 138

Yemen

X

IPEC

C. 138

Yugoslavia 1

C. 105

Zimbabwe

X

X

IPEC

C. 111

C. 87, 138

* This country has now ratified all the fundamental Conventions.

1 This concerns the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia since, pursuant to decisions taken by the Governing Body in line with the respective United Nations resolutions, no State is recognized as the continuation of this Member.


 

Updated by VC. Approved by NdW. Last update: 26 January 2000.