UN Day

ILO holds a dialogue with Indonesian youth on human centered recovery and future of work

As part of the UN Day celebration in Indonesia, the ILO participated in the lively discussion with youth during the thematic session.

News | Jakarta, Indonesia | 25 October 2021
ILO Country Director for Indonesia, Michiko Miyamoto, participated at the interactive discussion with Indonesian youth on 25 October. The event titled “Indonesia Needs Youth Conference: A Decade Collaboration” marked the commemoration of 76th of UN anniversary.

Michiko Miyamoto, Country Director ILO in Indonesia, during the session with Indonesian youth
For Indonesia, the event also marked the launch of the United Nations Association Indonesia (UNA Indonesia). UNA is a non-governmental organization aimed to enhance the relationship between people of the Member states and the UN to raise the awareness of the UN and its works.

Recognizing the importance of youth’s involvement, UNA Indonesia also aims to provide a platform for youth to be part of the dialogues at the national level with UN and its agencies in Indonesia and with other relevant partners.

One of the ILO’s focuses in Indonesia is to build and enhance young talent according to the needs of industries."

Michiko opened her thematic session with a key question to the participating youth: What will you do in 2030? She then highlighted information on youth employment during pandemic, how important it is coming out of pandemic to take human centered approach investing in people given large youth working population in Indonesia

Looking into future of work, she highlighted the importance of young people to focus on jobs that will be needed in the future. Pandemic accelerated expansion of digital and ICT sectors. Indonesia SME sector alone needs 600,000 digital talents every year. “There are big opportunities for youth with skills that are relevant with the labour market. One of the ILO’s focuses in Indonesia is to build and enhance young talent according to the needs of industries,” she explained. She also encouraged young women to pursue their dreams and interests in technology.

Social dialogue is ILO’s mantra. Dialogues can unite different opinions and views into win-win solutions for all parties involved. This is important for Indonesia, considering its diversities."

Responding to young students how to face up mounting challenges ahead, she shared her experiences pursuing her passion and is now the first ILO’s female director in Indonesia. “Establishing a habit to challenge yourself and think independently while you are young. No matter how old or young you are, never stop learning. Lifelong learning is a key to tackle constant changes and challenges,” she shared.

Responding to the question on how the ILO deals with its tripartite counterparts and other social partners, Michiko emphasized the importance of communications in the forms of social dialogues. The dialogues could bring different parties, views and ideas together.

“Social dialogue is ILO’s mantra. Dialogues can unite different opinions and views into win-win solutions for all parties involved. This is important for Indonesia, considering its diversities,” she added.

She concluded her session with a compliment for enthusiast shown by the participating youth to learn about the rights of youth at the workplace. Other questions raised by the youth included social protection for youth, strengthening youth’s collective bargaining, freedom of association and working-age population.