OSH Campaign

Enhancing OSH in the workplace, through social dialogue

National occupational safety and health (OSH) systems can be improved and strengthened by creating a culture of prevention through meaningful social dialogue. This requires effective cooperation and collaboration among government, employer and worker representatives—as equal and independent partners—to find solutions to issues of common concern. Indonesia is rapidly improving its national OSH system and building a culture of prevention through effective social dialogue at national and enterprise levels.

News | Montevideo, Uruguay | 22 November 2018
The discussion session of the Tripartite Study Tour on National Tripartite Social Dialogue
The huge toll of human suffering as well as the social and economic costs of occupational accidents and diseases have affected countries across the globe, including Indonesia. Despite strong international labour standards and national laws, progress has been limited. To improve the national occupational safety and health (OSH) system in Indonesia, particularly for young workers, requires a strong mobilization of key stakeholders—to ask hard questions and to implement more determined policies and actions.

As part of the ILO’s support to strengthen the national OSH system, Indonesian delegates joined a Tripartite Study Tour on National Tripartite Social Dialogue and Mainstreaming Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) into Technical and Vocational Education and Training held in Montevideo, Uruguay, from 13-16 November 2018. The study tour also included representative delegations from Viet Nam, the Philippines and Myanmar.

The study tour was conducted by the ILO through its SafeYouth@Work Project, funded by the US Department of Labour. The Project supports countries in effectively addressing OSH issues for young workers, focusing on improvements in OSH data, laws and policies, technical capacity and public awareness. In South-East Asia the Project works in Myanmar, Viet Nam, the Philippines and Indonesia.

The study tour has shown significant correlation between social dialogue and OSH. Indonesia could learn from this, especially since the conditions of Uruguay are similar with Indonesia."

Ghazmahadi, Head of Sub-Directorate of Supervision of Construction, Building, Electricity and Fire Extinguisher, Ministry of Manpower, Indonesia
During the study tour, the participants learnt from the solid experience of the National Tripartite OSH Council in Uruguay. Created in 1996, the OSH Council has demonstrated that effective social dialogue significantly enhances the efficiency and effectiveness of the national OSH system. It has had great impact in improving the health and safety of conditions at work by reducing occupational injuries and diseases, particularly for young workers.

Ernesto Murro, Minister Labour and Social Security of Uruguay, stated that OSH is a key part of the quality improvement of the national system of labour administration, and requires the commitment of key labour actors in social dialogue. In a system of effective social dialogue, government, workers and employers should work together toward common goals. The Minister also discussed different approaches to improving national OSH systems, touching on political relations, human relations and building exchange relationships.

The study tour participants visited and learned from the experience of the Inter-American Centre for Knowledge Development in Vocational Training (CINTERFOR). The Centre is an ILO specialized centre based in Montevideo, devoting to strengthen labour competencies and coordinating a network of more than 65 public and private institutions and entities from 27 countries in Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Africa.

Trade unions need to have better understanding about OSH as together we can improve our OSH systems through more effective social dialogue."

Wawan Erfianto, Vice President of Confederation of Indonesia Trade Unions
The participants also visited several educational institutions that have mainstreamed OSH issues into their curriculum, such as the Technical and Vocational Education and Training Council (CETP-UTU) and the tripartite National Institution for Employment and Vocational Training (INEFOP). In addition, the participants observed active construction and agricultural sites and met with the labour inspection unit under the Ministry of Labour and Social Security.

“The study tour has shown significant correlation between social dialogue and OSH. Indonesia could learn from this, especially since the conditions of Uruguay are similar with Indonesia," said Ghazmahadi, Head of Sub-Directorate of Supervision of Construction, Building, Electricity and Fire Extinguisher, Ministry of Manpower, Indonesia.

In terms of OSH structures, he added that similar to Uruguay, Indonesia also has a national OSH council (called DK3N). “Our OSH council is even older that the Uruguay. While they have CONASSAT, we have the Association of OSH Experts for Construction Sector (A2K4). It means that we can also achieve great impact at the national level.”

Meanwhile, Wawan Erfianto, Vice President of Confederation of Indonesia Trade Unions, emphasized the importance of involving workers and unions in OSH related issues at both national and enterprise levels. “Trade unions need to have better understanding about OSH as together we can improve our OSH systems through more effective social dialogue. “

As a follow-up to the study tour, the Ministry of Manpower is planning to involve more participation of unions in OSH related activities and trainings. The ILO and the SafeYouth@Work Project promote tripartite cooperation in the design and implementation of OSH policies, in support of good governance, cooperation, consensus and commitment on key national policies.

Disclaimer

Funding for the ILO SafeYouth@Work Project is provided by the United States Department of Labour under cooperative agreement Number IL-26690-14-75-K-11.

This material does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the United States Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the United States Government. One hundred percentage of the total costs of the project or program is financed with Federal funds, for a total of 11,443,156 dollars.