World Day against Child Labour 2016

Tackling child labour in supply chains in Indonesia

This year’s World Day against Child Labour is marked by a focus on child labour and supply chains. Taking the theme: “End Child Labour in Supply Chains”, the International Labour Organization (ILO), in collaboration with the United States Embassy in Jakarta, is organising an event on Wednesday, 8 June 2016, at @America, Jakarta, to increase awareness on the existence of the child labour in both production of goods and services for domestic markets and exports.

Press release | Jakarta, Indonesia | 07 June 2016
Marking the World Day Against Child Labour in Jakarta
JAKARTA (ILO News) - This year’s World Day Against Child Labour is marked by a focus on child labour and supply chains. Taking the theme: “End Child Labour in Supply Chains”, the International Labour Organization (ILO), in collaboration with the United States Embassy in Jakarta, is organising an event on Wednesday, 8 June 2016, at @America, Jakarta, to increase awareness on the existence of the child labour in both production of goods and services for domestic markets and exports.

Supply chains are the sequence of activities/processes involved in the production and distribution of a product. With globalization, supply chains have become increasingly complex, involving workers, small producers, and enterprises around the world. With 168 million children still in child labour, all supply chains, from agriculture to manufacturing, services to construction, run the risk that child labour may present.

With the growing complexity of global supply chains, governments, employers, and unions need to be particularly vigilant in their efforts to prevent‎ children from becoming involved in hazardous work."

Robert O. Blake, the US Ambassador to Indonesia
Child labour occurs in many occupations, in particular in rural and informal economies, and in areas where labour market governance, trade unions and employers’ organizations are often weak or absent and in areas that labour inspectors lack the capacity to reach. In supply chains, child labour may be performed in small workshops or homes, and often goes undetected by firms at the top of the chain, making it difficult to identify and remedy.

While many children may be engaged in child labour in the production of internationally traded goods or services, a much larger number work in producing items destined for national consumption. In addition, multinational enterprises may be linked to it in international supply chains directly – through their own facilities, suppliers or subcontractors – or simply by having operations in areas where child labour is common.

Although the last link of the supply chain might be child labour free, one has to trace back the previous links to ensure that violations are not hidden in the process. This is not an easy task, it requires patience and commitments of all stakeholders, including government, workers, employers and enterprises."

Francesco d’Ovidio, Country Director of the ILO in Indonesia
“With the growing complexity of global supply chains, governments, employers, and unions need to be particularly vigilant in their efforts to prevent‎ children from becoming involved in hazardous work,” said the US Ambassador to Indonesia, Robert O. Blake, commenting on the importance of pro-active involvement of key labour actors to end child labour in supply chains.

Francesco d’Ovidio, Country Director of the ILO in Indonesia, said that tackling child labour in supply chains requires concerted efforts on all fronts. “The World Day is an opportunity to keep an eye on child labour in the supply chain, a sector where decent work deficits are not always visible. Although the last link of the supply chain might be child labour free, one has to trace back the previous links to ensure that violations are not hidden in the process. This is not an easy task, it requires patience and commitments of all stakeholders, including government, workers, employers and enterprises,” he stated.

The event will include an interactive dialogue on ways to strengthen collaboration amongst relevant stakeholders, and presentations by government officials, enterprises, and the US Embassy. It will also showcase best practices at the enterprise level which demonstrate efforts to tackle child labour in supply chains.

More than 200 invitees will attend the event, including government officials, trade unions, employers’ organizations, international and national organizations, students and mass media.

The ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy (the MNE Declaration) makes clear that all enterprises have the responsibility to obey national law and to contribute to the realization of all fundamental principles and rights at work – including the elimination of child labour as defined in ILO Conventions No. 138 on Minimum Age and No. 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labour.

For further information please contact:

Arum Ratnawati
ILO’s National Chief Technical Adviser of the Child Labour Programme
Tel.: +6221 3913112 ext. 130
Email: arum@ilo.org

Gita Lingga
Media Relations Officer
Tel.: +6221 3913112 ext. 115
Email: gita@ilo.org