Publications on Green Jobs

August 2010

  1. From shipyard to renewable energy centre: Tomorrow’s jobs will be green

    01 August 2010

    The following article shows that – with resources and imagination – ways can be found to meet the twin challenges currently facing the world: the need to move towards an economy based on a much lower carbon footprint whilst at the same time bringing the world out of its present recession and finding employment. Andrew Bibby, a British journalist, reports from Odense, Denmark.

July 2010

  1. Report: Workshop on Climate Change, Its Impacts on Employment and Labour Markets, March 2010

    01 July 2010

    This workshop was organised by the Global Union Research Network (GURN) and coordinated by the ILO’s Bureau for Workers’ Activities (ACTRAV) and the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC). The aim was to discuss academic research on the employment aspects of climate change and identify research gaps.

May 2010

  1. The impact of climate change on employment: transition management through social dialogue

    07 May 2010

    Case study on a social dialogue roundtable initiative established to fulfil and guarantee the compatibility of the objective of emissions reductions with those of social cohesion and economic development.

  2. Estimating green jobs in Bangladesh

    06 May 2010

    This report summarizes the main findings of a study on the scale and distribution of green employment in the economy of Bangladesh. It contributes to the ongoing work of the ‘Green Jobs Initiative’ in the country. A GHK report for the ILO

March 2010

  1. Study on green employment in China

    01 March 2010

    This research is conducted by the research team of Institute for Labor Studies, Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security. This study presents both the current situation and potential for green employment in China, as well as results of surveys conducted in eight companies in the power industry.

December 2009

  1. Routes Out of the Crisis: Strategies for Local Employment Recovery, Skills Development and Social protection in Asia

    03 December 2009

    India National Case Study A “Green” Value Chain Development Exercise in Jabalpur, India

November 2009

  1. The Employment Effects of Climate Change and Climate Change Responses: A Role for International Labour Standards?

    01 November 2009

January 2009

  1. Brochure - Green Jobs: Improving the climate for gender equality too!

    30 January 2009

    January 2009 theme of the Gender Equality at the Heart of Decent Work Campaign, 2008-2009

September 2008

  1. Green Jobs: Towards decent work in a sustainable, low-carbon world (report overview)

    24 September 2008

    The present overview draws on evidence and findings presented in the report “Green Jobs: Towards Decent Work in a Sustainable, Low-Carbon World”. While the overview is consistent with the report, it also includes reflections emerging from the exchanges among the partners of the Green Jobs Initiative not contained in the original report. The original report is commissioned and funded by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), as part of the Green Jobs Initiative jointly mounted by UNEP, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the International Organisation of Employers (IOE) and the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC). It is produced by the Worldwatch Institute, with technical assistance from the Cornell University Global Labour Institute, for UNEP.

  2. Green Jobs: Towards Decent Work in a Sustainable, Low-Carbon World (Full report)

    24 September 2008

    The report entitled “Green Jobs: Towards Decent Work in a Sustainable, Low-Carbon World” is the first comprehensive study on the emergence of a “green economy” and its impact on the world of work. It includes new data that shows a changing pattern of employment in which green jobs are being generated in many sectors and economies around the world as a result of measures to tackle climate change and to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. This has also led to changing patterns of investment flows into areas such as renewable energy and energy efficiency at the household and industrial level. Within current policy frameworks, only a fraction of the potential benefits for jobs and development is forthcoming.