ILO's work on cooperatives in Africa

  1. Publication

    Cooperatives: The sleeping economic and social giants in Uganda

    01 February 2010

    The model of cooperatives in Tanzania mainland that has been adopted both currently and historically is outlined. It is observed that cooperatives were successful in the pre-abolition era (i.e. before 1976). Cooperatives suffered many setbacks in the post-abolition period (the period after 1982).

  2. Publication

    Cooperatives in Tanzania mainland: Revival and growth

    01 February 2010

    The model of cooperatives in Tanzania mainland that has been adopted both currently and historically is outlined. It is observed that cooperatives were successful in the pre-abolition era (i.e. before 1976). Cooperatives suffered many setbacks in the post-abolition period (the period after 1982).

  3. Publication

    Economic empowerment of Swazi society through cooperative development

    01 February 2010

    The paper shows that the cooperative movement in Swaziland is relatively small when compared to other African countries, and its growth has been fluctuating over the years. The decline in the number of cooperatives has been noticeable in the agricultural sector, though most of the cooperatives in the country are in this sector. Savings and credit cooperatives (SACCOs) are still emerging, but they have recorded better growth than the latter.

  4. Publication

    Cooperatives and development: a case of citizen economic empowerment in Botswana

    01 February 2010

    The cooperative movement in Botswana has been expected to serve a broad set of socio-economic and political objectives. The government perceives cooperatives as a means for empowering its people to own businesses and in the process acquire entrepreneurial skills that can enable them to participate in social and economic development. In Botswana, cooperatives were established by the government immediately after independence and operated within the interests of the Government, as outlined in the Cooperative Societies Law.

  5. Publication

    Fair trade - fair futures : the Kilimanjaro Native Cooperative Union scholarship programme for orphan and vulnerable children

    01 September 2009

    CoopAFRICA Working Paper No. 6 - with ILO/AIDS, Series on HIV/AIDS impact mitigation in the world of work – responses from the social economy

  6. Publication

    Social economy approaches to mainstreaming HIV/AIDS : the case of the Kasojetua youth group

    01 September 2009

    CoopAFRICA Working Paper No. 5 - with ILO/AIDS, Series on HIV/AIDS impact mitigation in the world of work – responses from the social economy

  7. Publication

    African cooperatives and the financial crisis

    01 September 2009

    Considers how institutions from the social economy, particularly cooperatives and cooperative financial institutions throughout the world and in Sub-Saharan Africa, are managing the current crisis and how they may be contributing to impact mitigation.

  8. Publication

    Surviving liberalization: the cooperative movement in Kenya

    01 August 2009

    Cooperative development in Kenya, like in most African countries, has generally traversed two main eras, namely, the era of state control and that of liberalization. The first era, which saw the origin and substantial growth of cooperatives under state direction, conditioned these organizations to emerge as dependent agents and/or clients of the state and other semi-public agencies. By serving as instruments for implementing government socio-economic policies, cooperatives were engulfed into state politics to the extent that the failures of state policies found expression in the cooperative movement.

  9. Publication

    Cooperatives in Africa: The age of reconstruction - synthesis of a survey in nine African countries

    01 August 2009

    Many governments have adopted a pro-cooperative attitude, mirrored in updated legislation and functioning cooperative departments. In some cases, the regulating policy may be felt as meddlesome by certain cooperative movements. While in other cases, the government is trying to restore the movement’s institutions. Cooperative movements, as well as selected cooperatives, have benefited from donor programmes. Different types of donors have been prominent, including northern cooperative movement agencies, bilateral agencies, UN-agencies and some NGOs. Most programmes seek to enhance institutional strength, value chain monitoring, rural access to finance and training in governance.

  10. Publication

    Bearing the brunt of a liberalized economy: A performance review of the cooperative movement in Zambia

    01 August 2009

    Cooperatives in Zanzibar stagnated after the Cooperative Union of Tanzania (CUT), to which the cooperative movement on the Isles had been affiliated, underwent reforms in 1991. As of December 2008 there were 4,761 registered primary cooperatives and 83,734 cooperative members from Zanzibar’s total population of 984,625. The evidence that is presented suggests that the apex organization (CUZA) and the cooperative unions in Zanzibar are very weak and over the past decade little work has been done to strengthen the movement.