INDIA; THE SEARCH FOR HIGHER VALUE-ADDED ICT MARKETS

India’s software industry has grown at a phenomenal rate of over 50 percent in the last decade. Trivandum is home to just one of the many software Technology Parks set up by the Indian government that has brought the country racing into the information economy.

Date issued: 23 January 2001 | Size/duration: 00:02:40 (4.27 MB)

Trivandum, capital of Kerala State in Southern India, gateway for software development. Trivandum is home to one of the many software Technology Parks set up by the Indian government that has brought the country racing into the information economy.

India’s software industry has grown at a phenomenal rate of over 50 percent in the last decade. Total revenues approached 5.7 billion dollars last year, 70 percent of that from exports alone. The country has set a target of 50 billion dollars in software exports by the year 2008. It already holds 18 and a half percent of the global market for customized software that is outsourced across borders.

Borders such as Germany. Monitor displays from Kerala appear directly on the screens of software engineers in Lebenkeusen where details for a new municipal database are worked out together by phone. This intercontinental teamwork functions perfectly without losing any valuable know-how as is often the case with outsourcing.

My vision for this set-up is that we would like to make this development center as a world class development center, where we are referred to as one of the best sites in the world for technological excellence and for the kind of skills we have, technical skills.

Kerala already has one of the best educated workforces in the entire country. Basic literacy skills are in place. University graduates in computer sciences are in high demand abroad. But competition for jobs in the Technology parks is fierce. Hima Madhusoodan has a degree in engineering and computer sciences. 1500 people applied for her job as software specialist with a German company, eager for the additional training that comes with it.

I do like computers. Compared to what we’re used to, this is absolutely the tops. I’m more than pleased. We have equal chances and we try to make use of them. All companies are in the business of making a profit. If they prefer to come to India, then good.

And if they prefer to bring Indian know-how to their own doorstep, then just as good. The technologies are capable of both.