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Duty to inform about the investigation (917,-666)

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Keywords: Duty to inform about the investigation
Total judgments found: 7

  • Judgment 4237


    129th Session, 2020
    World Health Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant challenges the decision – taken after his resignation – to find him guilty of serious misconduct, and the decision to withhold from his separation entitlements an amount corresponding to financial losses allegedly incurred by WHO as a result of his misconduct.

    Consideration 10

    Extract:

    There is no obligation to inform a staff member that an investigation into certain allegations will be undertaken (see Judgment 2605, under 11).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2605

    Keywords:

    duty to inform about the investigation;

    Consideration 10

    Extract:

    Moreover, there is no principle in the Tribunal’s case law which requires that an official should receive detailed information about the allegations prior to the investigation interview (see Judgment 4106, under 9).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 4106

    Keywords:

    duty to inform about the investigation;



  • Judgment 4106


    127th Session, 2019
    International Labour Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant contests the decision to apply to him the sanction of discharge.

    Consideration 9

    Extract:

    [T]he requirement spelled out in the Tribunal’s case law that “an investigation be conducted in a manner designed to ascertain all relevant facts without compromising the good name of the employee and that the employee be given an opportunity to test the evidence put against him or her and to answer the charge made” (see Judgments 2475, under 7, 2771, under 15, 3200, under 10, 3315, under 6, 3682, under 13, 3872, under 6, and 3875, under 3) was respected in the present case. At the outset, it is observed that there is no obligation to inform a staff member that an investigation into certain allegations will be undertaken (see Judgment 2605, under 11). The evidence shows that the complainant was informed at the outset of the investigation interview that the interview related to allegations of misconduct and that he was given the opportunity to weigh the evidence presented, respond to the allegations, and to provide any evidence or name any witnesses to support his responses. He was also given the opportunity to submit any further evidence or information in his defence prior to the conclusion of the investigation. There is no principle in the Tribunal’s case law which supports the complainant’s claim that he should have received detailed information about the allegations prior to the investigation interview.

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2475, 2605, 2771, 3200, 3315, 3682, 3872, 3875

    Keywords:

    disciplinary procedure; duty to inform about the investigation; inquiry; investigation; right to be heard; right to reply;



  • Judgment 4039


    126th Session, 2018
    International Labour Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant, who alleges that he is the victim of institutional harassment and discrimination, seeks redress for the injury he considers he has suffered.

    Consideration 6

    Extract:

    The sole purpose of an investigation is to establish the existence of facts that may be contested during disciplinary proceedings in which the rights of defence must be scrupulously safeguarded. The Tribunal considers that it is “clear that the rules relating to due process, in particular, which must be respected scrupulously during the actual disciplinary proceedings [...] (see, for example, Judgment 2475), do not apply during the investigation of matters brought before an internal auditing body” (see Judgment 2589, under 7). The Tribunal holds that, while it is preferable to notify the person concerned that she or he is to be the subject of an investigation, except where this would be liable to compromise the outcome of the investigation, such notification is not a requisite element of due process (see Judgment 3295, under 8).
    Once the investigation is opened, the organisation is under an obligation to provide the person concerned with an opportunity to explain her or his conduct and to present any information on her or his behalf. The Uniform Guidelines for Investigations do not, however, stipulate when the person concerned must be given this opportunity, since the aforementioned paragraph 17 of the Guidelines provides that this matter “is regulated by the rules, policies and procedures of the Organization”. In the International Labour Office there is no internal manual or practical guide setting out the procedure to be followed when conducting such interviews. Like the JAAB, the Tribunal considers that the above-mentioned opportunity should preferably be afforded before rather than during the interview. However, in this case, there is nothing to indicate that the complainant was in any way prevented from defending himself on account of the manner in which the investigation was conducted (see, in this connection, Judgment 2771, under 18).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2475, 2589, 2771, 3295

    Keywords:

    disciplinary procedure; duty to inform about the investigation; inquiry; investigation; procedural rights during investigation; right to be heard;



  • Judgment 3578


    121st Session, 2016
    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant challenges the decision to summarily dismiss him for serious misconduct.

    Consideration 14

    Extract:

    There is no obligation to inform a person in advance that an investigation will be undertaken (Judgment 2605, under 11).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2605

    Keywords:

    duty to inform about the investigation;



  • Judgment 3295


    116th Session, 2014
    Pan American Health Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complaint concerning a disciplinary measure was dismissed by the Tribunal on the grounds that he had not demonstrated the existence of an error warranting the cancellation of the sanction.

    Consideration 8

    Extract:

    Regarding the question of whether the subject of an investigation must be given notice of the investigation, in Judgment 2605, under 11, the Tribunal held as follows:
    “The Tribunal considers that informing a person in advance that an investigation into certain allegations will be undertaken is not a requisite element of due process. Although notification prior to the start of an investigation may well be the preferred course of action, in certain circumstances alerting an individual to the fact that an investigation is to be undertaken may well compromise the investigation. As well, it may be through a routine review or audit that irregularities are encountered. It is once irregularities have been identified that the individual must be informed of the allegations of irregularities with sufficient precision to enable him to respond adequately; he should then be given an opportunity to respond, in particular to defend himself against the allegations, and to make such further response as the circumstances require prior to any conclusions being reached.”

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2605

    Keywords:

    duty to inform about the investigation;



  • Judgment 3200


    115th Session, 2013
    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant challenges the decision to impose on her the disciplinary measure of demotion.

    Consideration 8

    Extract:

    It will often be fair to the accused to give notice of the allegations some time before the interview, perhaps even days, so that the accused has an opportunity to gather their thoughts about who might give evidence on the accused’s behalf and, in appropriate cases, identify documents which might assist the accused’s defence. Of course, as paragraph 5.2 [of the OSDI Quality Assurance Manual] also contemplates, such notice might be inappropriate if it compromised the integrity of the investigation, but that is likely not to be the norm. However, what is clear is that this step of informing the accused of the allegations should occur before the interview.

    Keywords:

    duty to inform about the investigation; notification of allegations; procedural rights during investigation;



  • Judgment 2605


    102nd Session, 2007
    International Organization for Migration
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 11

    Extract:

    "The Tribunal considers that informing a person in advance that an investigation into certain allegations will be undertaken is not a requisite element of due process. Although notification prior to the start of an investigation may well be the preferred course of action, in certain circumstances alerting an individual to the fact that an investigation is to be undertaken may well compromise the investigation. As well, it may be through a routine review or audit that irregularities are encountered. It is once irregularities have been identified that the individual must be informed of the allegations of irregularities with sufficient precision to enable him to respond adequately; he should then be given an opportunity to respond, in particular to defend himself against the allegations, and to make such further response as the circumstances require prior to any conclusions being reached."

    Keywords:

    duty to inform about the investigation; inquiry; investigation; procedure before the tribunal; right to reply;


 
Last updated: 23.09.2021 ^ top