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Due process in disciplinary procedure (901,-666)

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Keywords: Due process in disciplinary procedure
Total judgments found: 7

  • Judgment 4311


    130th Session, 2020
    International Labour Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant challenges the decision to apply the sanction of summary dismissal to him.

    Consideration 4

    Extract:

    Since the IAO report resulted from a thorough investigation and provided all the necessary information, there was no need for the Committee on Accountability to conduct a fresh investigation. In assessing the facts set out in the IAO report and drawing the conclusions it considered warranted, the Committee complied with its mandate under the Rules of Procedure. As the Tribunal has previously held, when an organisation initiates proceedings in the light of a report on an internal investigation, it is not obliged to repeat all the investigative steps recorded in the report, but must simply ensure that the person concerned is given the opportunity to reply to the findings it contains so as to respect the rights of defence (see Judgments 2773, under 9, and 3640, under 16).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2773, 3640

    Keywords:

    due process in disciplinary procedure;



  • Judgment 4310


    130th Session, 2020
    International Labour Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant challenges the decision to apply the sanction of summary dismissal to him.

    Consideration 10

    Extract:

    [T]he ILO argues that the adversarial principle was duly observed, having regard to the procedure as a whole. It submits that the complainant must have been aware of the content of the investigation report of January 2015 and the allegations made against him, as one of the investigators had explained to him that a report would be compiled on the basis of the interview he had just held with him. During that interview, the complainant was given ample opportunity to respond to the allegations made against him. Furthermore, it submits that the complainant was given the opportunity to provide additional information when he was invited to submit his observations on the proposal for a sanction, which he did. The ILO hence concludes that the complainant exercised his right to be heard on several occasions during the procedure and, in any case, before the final decision to impose a sanction was taken.
    However, the fact that the complainant was interviewed during an investigation into certain events and had the opportunity to answer questions relating to those events does not, as the Organization suggests, imply that he was aware of the content of the investigation report subsequently drawn up on the basis of that interview, or of the allegations ultimately upheld by the IAO and the reasons why they were upheld.

    Keywords:

    adversarial proceedings; due process in disciplinary procedure; procedural rights during investigation;

    Consideration 11

    Extract:

    [I]t [cannot] be argued that the Committee on Accountability’s report [...] – communicated to the complainant [...] at the same time as the proposal to dismiss him summarily – constituted adequate information. That very brief report merely listed the headings of the allegations against him.

    Keywords:

    due process in disciplinary procedure;

    Consideration 11

    Extract:

    It is not disputed that the complainant had never seen the IAO’s investigation report prior to filing his complaint with the Tribunal on 19 June 2017. Having regard to the Organization’s explanations, it seems that the report was not provided to him until 6 September 2017.
    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board rightly considered that, in those circumstances, the adversarial principle and, more particularly, the complainant’s rights of defence had been breached.
    As the Tribunal has repeatedly held, a staff member must, as a general rule, have access to all evidence on which the authority bases (or intends to base) a decision affecting her or him personally. Such evidence cannot be withheld on grounds of confidentiality unless there is some special case in which a higher interest stands in the way of disclosure (see Judgments 3732, under 6, and 3755, under 10), which was not the case here.
    The fact that the complainant was ultimately able to obtain the IAO investigation report during the proceedings before the Tribunal does not, in this case, remedy the flaw in the procedure. While the case law recognises that, in some cases, the non-disclosure of evidence can be corrected when this flaw is subsequently remedied, including in proceedings before the Tribunal (see, for example, Judgment 3117, under 11), that is not the case where the document in question is of vital importance having regard to the subject matter of the dispute, as it is here (see Judgments 2315, under 27, 3490, under 33, 3831, under 16, 17 and 29, and 3995, under 5).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2315, 3117, 3490, 3732, 3755, 3831, 3995

    Keywords:

    confidentiality; due process in disciplinary procedure; investigation report;



  • Judgment 3364


    118th Session, 2014
    World Health Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant successfully impugns on the grounds of a procedural flaw the decision to maintain his dismissal for misconduct.

    Consideration 26

    Extract:

    "Contrary to the argument put forward by WHO, the fact that the complainant admitted the truth of the facts imputed to him did not dispense it from the obligation to draw up the report provided for in the relevant provisions. A “transcript of the interview” cannot take the place of such a report."

    Keywords:

    due process in disciplinary procedure; investigation report;



  • Judgment 3200


    115th Session, 2013
    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant challenges the decision to impose on her the disciplinary measure of demotion.

    Judgment keywords

    Keywords:

    complaint allowed; decision quashed; disciplinary measure; downgrading; due process in disciplinary procedure;



  • Judgment 2741


    105th Session, 2008
    International Olive Oil Council
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 4

    Extract:

    A disciplinary penalty can be imposed only at the close of an adversarial procedure that fully guarantees the presumption of innocence and the staff member’s right to be heard. The facts complained of must be clearly stated and notified in good time so that the staff member can participate actively and fully in the taking of evidence both before the body responsible for conducting the investigation and before the advisory disciplinary body and the decision-making authority. These bodies must scrupulously avoid taking evidence from one party without the other’s knowledge, whether or not the evidence is prejudicial to the staff member (see Judgments 1133, 1212, 2254, under 6, and 2475, under 20).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 1133, 1212, 2254, 2475

    Keywords:

    adversarial proceedings; due process in disciplinary procedure; procedural rights during investigation;



  • Judgment 2261


    95th Session, 2003
    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 13

    Extract:

    There is no substance to the allegation of failure of due process. In particular, the mission report which gave the Organization information on which to base the decision to charge him, was a preliminary investigative tool and the complainant had no right to review its contents prior to the decision being made that the disciplinary procedure should be started. Once that procedure was under way, the complainant was given ample communication of the case against him and was afforded full opportunity to answer and make his defence. It was no breach of the principle of good faith for the Organization to ask the complainant for a statement of his activities and subsequently to use such statement, which was entirely exculpatory, as evidence of his deliberate attempt to mislead the investigation, which it manifestly was.

    Keywords:

    adversarial proceedings; disciplinary charges; due process in disciplinary procedure; inquiry; investigation; investigation report;



  • Judgment 2014


    90th Session, 2001
    United Nations Industrial Development Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 17(D)

    Extract:

    The complainant argues that his dismissal was based on unsubstantiated accusations and evidence that was not made available to him. "It is true that confidential information given to the auditors was not made known to him, the Joint Disciplinary Committee or the Joint Appeals Board. This puts that evidence in the realm of unsubstantiated hearsay which should not have been relied on. It is contrary to due process to require an accused staff member to answer unsubstantiated allegations made by unknown persons. The staff member is entitled to confront his or her accusers. In the present case, if the organization was not willing to disclose the identity of the complainant's accusers, and had no other independent evidence to rely on, the charges should not have been brought."

    Keywords:

    admissibility of evidence; adversarial proceedings; communication to third party; confidential evidence; disciplinary procedure; disclosure of evidence; due process; due process in disciplinary procedure; duty to inform; evidence; witness;


 
Last updated: 23.09.2021 ^ top