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Lack of consent (561,-666)

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Keywords: Lack of consent
Total judgments found: 27

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  • Judgment 4223


    129th Session, 2020
    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant impugns UNESCO’s refusal to grant her claim for a lump sum in lieu of a special post allowance.

    Consideration 6

    Extract:

    [S]ince there is no evidence to show that the complainant signed the said agreement as a result of misrepresentation or duress on the Organization’s part, her consent to its provisions cannot be considered to have been vitiated. The lawfulness of the provisions of that agreement, which, as stated above, rule out any claim to a financial benefit except those specified therein, is hence not open to challenge.

    Keywords:

    lack of consent;



  • Judgment 4072


    127th Session, 2019
    Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant challenges the lawfulness of the mutually agreed separation agreement which he signed.

    Judgment keywords

    Keywords:

    agreed termination; complaint allowed; decision quashed; duress; lack of consent; separation agreement;

    Consideration 4

    Extract:

    The defendant raises an objection to the receivability of the complaint, namely that the complainant, by signing the separation agreement, waived his right to challenge either the validity or the content thereof. However, since the complainant contends that he signed this agreement as a result of misrepresentation and pressure which vitiated his consent, this question of receivability is inseparable from the merits of the case (see Judgment 3424, consideration 12). As is also conceded by the defendant, the decision on the objection to receivability depends on the legal validity of the separation agreement, and this makes it necessary to consider the complainant’s pleas on the merits (see, in this regard, Judgments 3610, consideration 6, and 3750, consideration 5).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 3424, 3610, 3750

    Keywords:

    agreed termination; duress; lack of consent; receivability of the complaint; separation agreement; waiver of right of appeal;

    Consideration 8

    Extract:

    As regards the lack of both transparency and information, the Tribunal recalls that, according to its case law, the principle of good faith and the concomitant duty of care demand that international organizations treat their staff with due consideration in order to avoid causing them undue injury; an employer must consequently inform officials in advance of any action that may imperil their rights or harm their rightful interests (see Judgments 2116, consideration 5, 2768, consideration 4, 3024, consideration 12, and 3861, consideration 9).
    In the present case, the organization disregarded the principle of good faith and its duty of care. Indeed, as regards his past performance, the complainant was unaware, at the time of the meetings in question, of the outcome of the calibration of his evaluation referred to by those conducting the meeting. Nor was he informed of the competencies that had supposedly been evaluated in anticipation of the restructuring of the organization or of the new specific requirements of his post, which, according to the Appeal Board, were not reflected in the job descriptions, or of the new objectives, which, again according to the Board, had not been discussed with him. Unaware of the reasons why the organization considered that he did not meet the requirements in question, the complainant was not in a position to make a fully informed choice between the two proposed alternatives. It follows that his consent was vitiated.

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2116, 2768, 3024, 3861

    Keywords:

    duty of care; duty to inform; good faith; lack of consent; performance evaluation;



  • Judgment 4071


    127th Session, 2019
    Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainants challenge the lawfulness of the mutually agreed separation agreement which they signed.

    Judgment keywords

    Keywords:

    agreed termination; complaint allowed; decision quashed; duress; lack of consent; separation agreement;

    Consideration 5

    Extract:

    The defendant raises an objection to the receivability of the complaints, namely that the complainants, by signing the separation agreements, waived their right to challenge either the validity or the content thereof. However, since the complainants contend that they signed these agreements as a result of misrepresentation and pressure which vitiated their consent, this question of receivability is inseparable from the merits of the case (see Judgment 3423, consideration 13). As is also conceded by the defendant, the decision on the objection to receivability depends on the legal validity of the separation agreements, and this makes it necessary to consider the complainants’ pleas on the merits (see, in this regard, Judgments 3610, consideration 6, and 3750, consideration 5).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 3423, 3610, 3750

    Keywords:

    agreed termination; duress; lack of consent; receivability of the complaint; separation agreement; waiver of right of appeal;

    Consideration 10

    Extract:

    As regards the lack of both transparency and information, the Tribunal recalls that, according to its case law, the principle of good faith and the concomitant duty of care demand that international organizations treat their staff with due consideration in order to avoid causing them undue injury; an employer must consequently inform officials in advance of any action that may imperil their rights or harm their rightful interests (see Judgments 2116, consideration 5, 2768, consideration 4, 3024, consideration 12, and 3861, consideration 9).
    In the present case, the organization disregarded the principle of good faith and its duty of care. Indeed, as regards their past performance, the complainants were unaware, at the time of the meetings in question, of the outcome of the calibration of their evaluations referred to by those conducting the meeting. Nor were the complainants informed of the competencies that had supposedly been evaluated in anticipation of the restructuring of the organization or of the new specific requirements of their posts, which, according to the Appeal Board, were not reflected in the job descriptions, or of the new objectives, which, again according to the Board, had not been discussed with them. Unaware of the reasons why the organization considered that they did not meet the requirements in question, the complainants were not in a position to make a fully informed choice between the two proposed alternatives. It follows that their consent was vitiated.

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2116, 2768, 3024, 3861

    Keywords:

    duty of care; duty to inform; good faith; lack of consent; performance evaluation;



  • Judgment 3900


    125th Session, 2018
    Centre for the Development of Enterprise
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant challenges the decision to terminate her contract owing to the closure of the CDE and the terms and conditions of that termination.

    Consideration 13

    Extract:

    The allegation that awarding an indemnity higher than that provided for in the Staff Regulations only to staff members who were prepared to sign the settlement agreement and who renounced any right of appeal constitutes an abuse of authority is tantamount to saying that an agreement containing a waiver of the right of any action or appeal would be flawed. This is, however, inconsistent with the case law of the Tribunal which recalled in Judgment 3867, under 5, that “in the context of a settlement, as is the case here, the infringement of an official’s right to appeal or file a complaint is not unlawful. On the contrary, it is entirely acceptable for an official to waive such rights in return for the benefits gained from the settlement. This is, furthermore, common practice in the context of separation agreements, as here”. Naturally, as the same judgment makes clear, the agreement must make provision for benefits over and above those stemming from the applicable staff regulations, otherwise this would amount to improper pressure brought to bear on the official in return for nothing but the organisation’s honouring of its own duties (see Judgment 2715, under 13; see also Judgment 3091, under 13).

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2715, 3091, 3867

    Keywords:

    agreed termination; lack of consent; waiver of right of appeal;



  • Judgment 3160


    114th Session, 2013
    United Nations Industrial Development Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR
    Summary: The complainant successfully impugns the Director-General's decision to reject his appeal concerning breaches of confidentiality.

    Considerations 11 and 15

    Extract:

    "This Tribunal has recognised staff members’ right to privacy. An example is found in Judgment 2271. [...]
    [T]he issue is whether there was a breach of privacy or confidentiality as a result of the disclosure to the Director of PSM/HRM of the fact that the complainant had made an Appendix D claim. The answer is readily found in Judgment 3004 at consideration 6. [...] The disclosure of the mere fact that the claim had been made involved a breach of confidentiality. Being in a similar situation, the complainant should be awarded 4,000 euros as moral damages for breach of confidentiality."

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2271, 3004

    Keywords:

    breach; communication to third party; confidential evidence; lack of consent; moral injury; organisation's duties;



  • Judgment 2915


    109th Session, 2010
    World Intellectual Property Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 6

    Extract:

    "It is correct that a vested right cannot be divested without the consent of the person to whom it belongs. However, it does not follow that a corresponding condition or obligation - in this case, the condition or obligation to retire at 60 - depends on continuing consent. A condition once accepted or an obligation once entered [...] endures unless and until it is performed or the person is released from it either absolutely or by substitution of a different and mutually agreed condition or obligation."

    Keywords:

    complainant; condition; effect; lack of consent; successive contracts; terms of appointment;



  • Judgment 2758


    105th Session, 2008
    International Labour Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 7

    Extract:

    "[D]eceit consists in the manoeuvres of one party to mislead the other and obtain his or her consent. Deceit cannot be presumed; it must be proved, if necessary by means of strong, precise and concurring presumptions."

    Keywords:

    admissibility of evidence; definition; evidence; lack of consent;



  • Judgment 2308


    96th Session, 2004
    World Health Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Considerations 15-18

    Extract:

    "The complainant seeks compensation in lost salary and benefits for the years during which she has been remunerated on the basis of short-term employment while performing work of indefinite duration equivalent to that of a fixed-term staff member. In other words, she claims a retroactive fixed-term status. There is no basis on which the complainant can claim to be treated retroactively as if she had a fixed-term contract. She was recruited as a short-term staff member without having to go through a competition process; she accepted several contract renewals. It was within the discretionary authority of the Director-General to decide during all those years whether to renew each short-term contract or offer her a fixed-term contract [...]. She accepted and signed all the short-term contracts. [...] If it is sought to have the Tribunal treat those short-term contracts as being null, it must be shown that they have violated some fundamental and overriding principle of law or that her apparent consent thereto was vitiated (see Judgment 2097, under 11). This, the complainant has failed to do."

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2097

    Keywords:

    acceptance; appointment; burden of proof; contract; discretion; duration of appointment; fixed-term; injury; lack of consent; law of contract; offer; short-term; status of complainant;



  • Judgment 2282


    96th Session, 2004
    International Atomic Energy Agency
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 11

    Extract:

    "The integrity of the internal appellate process is of fundamental importance to the proper functioning of the international civil service. Like the process before the Tribunal itself, it must be free of any taint of fraud or abuse of power. If mere delay in the completion of an internal appeal is enough to vitiate the process (see Judgments 2072 and 2197), how much more will that be the case where the process is corrupted at its very source by an attempt to keep staff members from exercising their legal rights. The Tribunal asserts unhesitatingly that intimidation or threats of reprisal in such circumstances will be severely sanctioned. Indeed, there is a positive obligation on the part of the administration of every international organisation to assist staff in the exercise of their recourse and to place no obstacle in their way."

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 2072, 2197

    Keywords:

    delay; due process; hidden disciplinary measure; internal appeal; internal appeals body; lack of consent; misuse of authority; organisation's duties; procedural flaw; procedure before the tribunal; right; submissions;



  • Judgment 2271


    96th Session, 2004
    European Patent Organisation
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 7

    Extract:

    "The confidential nature of medical information concerning the state of health of staff members constitutes a key element of their right to privacy. It is no doubt both necessary and legitimate for an international organisation, like any employer, to investigate requests for sick leave, to examine medical certificates and to have the health of its staff members checked by appropriate means. Such information should be gathered and processed on a fully confidential basis, however, and should never be communicated to third parties without the explicit consent of the person concerned. [...] The fact that the members of the Appeals Committee are bound by an obligation of confidentiality does not mean that information covered by medical secrecy can be disclosed to them without the consent of the persons concerned."

    Keywords:

    communication to third party; confidential evidence; internal appeals body; lack of consent; medical certificate; medical records; organisation's duties; right to privacy; sick leave;



  • Judgment 2049


    91st Session, 2001
    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 5

    Extract:

    After lenghty negociations, the complainant accepted the offer of separation by mutual agreement (which increased by 50% his termination indemnity on the condition that he would not challenge the decision of separation either before the Appeals Board or the Tribunal). He pleads lack of consent. "The complainant cites financial difficulties and a 'reactive anxio-depressive clinical context' to demonstrate that he was in no state to consent freely. But the evidence shows that he had been examined by an expert chosen by mutual agreement between his doctor and the chief medical officer of [the organization] and that he had been found fit to resume work as from June 1996. There are no grounds for doubting that the complainant had all his mental faculties when, after lengthy negotiations, he finally accepted an offer which afforded him significant financial benefits. He has neither proved that his consent to the negotiated termination was deficient nor provided any evidence to cast doubt on its validity."

    Keywords:

    agreed termination; lack of consent; medical fitness; non-renewal of contract; offer; separation from service; terminal entitlements; waiver of right of appeal;



  • Judgment 1818


    86th Session, 1999
    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 15

    Extract:

    The provisions of the Statute and Staff Rules aiming at protecting staff members against termination in the course of sick leave do not prevent an organization from accepting, during such leave, the letter of resignation of a staff member, if the latter wrote his letter of his own free will.

    Keywords:

    acceptance; condition; lack of consent; resignation; sick leave; staff regulations and rules; termination of employment;



  • Judgment 1643


    83rd Session, 1997
    Universal Postal Union
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 5

    Extract:

    It is true that the suspension of the unit in which the complainant was employed was based on a mistake about the date of expiry of her contract. But she was aware of the mistake and knew full well what she was doing when she accepted the impugned decision. "So she may not plead lack of consent."

    Keywords:

    abolition of post; acceptance; contract; date; decision; duration of appointment; lack of consent; secondment;



  • Judgment 1432


    79th Session, 1995
    World Health Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 12

    Extract:

    "It is immaterial to the fact of recruitment that the decision to recruit her may have been taken ultra vires. [...] The organization must bear the consequences of any decision taken by someone it has itself appointed for the purpose".

    Keywords:

    appointment; contract; decision; decision-maker; lack of consent; liability; organisation; organisation's duties;

    Consideration 12

    Extract:

    It is immaterial to the fact of recruitment that the decision to recruit her [...] may not have followed the necessary formalities. [...] The lack of prior medical clearance for the new post does not amount to a fatal flaw in the mutual agreement between the WHO's agents and the complainant."

    Keywords:

    appointment; contract; lack of consent; medical examination;



  • Judgment 1232


    74th Session, 1993
    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 4

    Extract:

    Having been held in his home country against his wishes, the complainant applied, under duress, for early retirement, and the authorities of his country forwarded his application to the organization. "As soon as he was able to show that he had acted under duress UNESCO had the duty, according to the general principles that guarantee the independence of international civil servants, to grant relief. Such independence means that a staff member may not be put on early retirement where a member State has ordered him to apply for it."

    Keywords:

    burden of proof; early retirement; independence; international civil service principles; lack of consent; member state; official; organisation; organisation's duties; request by a party;



  • Judgment 1221


    74th Session, 1993
    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 3

    Extract:

    "It is plain on the evidence that the bureau of personnel told the complainant that the Director-General would be willing to waive the Appeals Board's jurisdiction [under UNESCO Staff Rule 111.2(b)] if she so wished, that she expressly agreed to the suggestion, and that she formally sought and was granted waiver by the Director-General." So the complainant appealed directly to the Tribunal "in full freedom".

    Reference(s)

    Organization rules reference: UNESCO STAFF RULE 111.2(B)

    Keywords:

    complainant; complaint; direct appeal to tribunal; internal remedies exhausted; lack of consent; receivability of the complaint;



  • Judgment 1075


    70th Session, 1991
    International Labour Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Summary

    Extract:

    The complainant's appointment was terminated by an agreement both parties reached under Article 11.16 of the Staff Regulations. He submits that the agreement is null and void because he signed it under duress. The Tribunal holds that the only pressure the ILO applied on him was the setting of a time limit (one day according to the complainant, two days according to the administration), but there was nothing improper in that.

    Reference(s)

    Organization rules reference: ARTICLE 11.16 OF THE ILO STAFF REGULATIONS

    Keywords:

    lack of consent; time limit;



  • Judgment 856


    63rd Session, 1987
    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 3

    Extract:

    "A resignation that has taken effect is final and may not be withdrawn unless the offer was tainted with some flaw that makes it void. There will ordinarily be such a flaw if the staff member underwent compelling outside pressure. [...] But more commonly the pressure will come from the employer."

    Keywords:

    application for quashing; condition; lack of consent; offer; resignation;



  • Judgment 841


    63rd Session, 1987
    European Southern Observatory
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Consideration 2

    Extract:

    The Organisation "was willing, exceptionally, to issue a qualified performance assessment certificate in the form specified by the laws of the Federal Republic as part of an overall settlement in which the complainant would be reimbursed in respect of certain expenses incurred by him and he in turn would be required to give a written statement that all his claims arising from his employment with the ESO had been settled and that he would refrain from making any further claims or take any further action against the Organisation. The complainant being unwilling to give such a statement, no settlement was reached. In the absence of agreement by both parties to the terms to the proposed settlement, the ESO is under no obligation to provide the complainant with the performance assessment he seeks."

    Reference(s)

    ILOAT Judgment(s): 780, 840, 842

    Keywords:

    certificate of service; lack of consent; offer; performance report; waiver of right of appeal;



  • Judgment 686


    57th Session, 1985
    World Health Organization
    Extracts: EN, FR
    Full Judgment Text: EN, FR

    Summary

    Extract:

    The complainant altered an appraisal report on her own performance. After being criticised for her conduct by a supervisor, she tendered her resignation. The complainant claims to have acted under pressure. In the view of the Tribunal, she had ample time to consider whether or not to resign. Her resignation is therefore valid.

    Keywords:

    lack of consent; offer; resignation;

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Last updated: 23.10.2020 ^ top