ILO Home
Go to the home page
Site map | Contact us Français | Español
view in a printer-friendly format »

Hotels and restaurants - 210 entries found

Your search criteria are

  • Hotels and restaurants

2005

CIS 06-726 Jones T., Strickfaden M., Kumar S.
Physical demands analysis of occupational tasks in neighbourhood pubs
This case study of a neighbourhood pub in British Columbia, Canada, employing a total of 17 people, examines three common pub occupations: bartending, waitressing and cooking. The biomechanical loads of job tasks identified as physically demanding were determined for the three occupations analysed. The potential risk of musculoskeletal injury in these job tasks was assessed using four validated methods (RULA, NIOSH lifting equation, Shoaf pulling model and the 3D Static Strength prediction program). Musculoskeletal injury prevention measures are proposed.
Applied Ergonomics, Sep. 2005, Vol.36, No.5, p.535-545. Illus. 30 ref.

CIS 06-710 Preventing slips and trips in kitchens and food service
This information sheet describes causes of slip and trip hazards in kitchens and food service areas and provides guidelines on their prevention. Precautions include ensuring floors have good surface roughness and do not become wet or slippery, slip assessment, selecting the correct footwear, avoiding uneven surfaces or changes in level, good housekeeping and training of personnel. Replaces CIS 03-1708.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, rev. ed., May 2005. 4p. Illus. 2 ref.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais6.pdf [in English]

CIS 05-351 Fast food restaurants: Prevention of occupational hazards
La restauration rapide: Prévention des risques professionnels [in French]
This safety guide is aimed at managers of fast-food restaurants involved in serving hamburgers, sandwiches and home delivery services. Its objective is to help restaurant managers analyse and evaluate the hazards in their premises and implement suitable preventive measures. Contents: duties and responsibilities of restaurant managers; health hazards; costs of occupational accidents and diseases; implementation of a prevention plan; persons holding responsibilities for occupational safety and health; risk factors; external contractors working on the premises; internal organization; training; personal protective equipment; first aid services, first aid staff, first aid kit.
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Jan. 2005. 51p. Illus. 30 ref. Price: EUR 8.00. Downloadable version free of charge.
http://www.inrs.fr/INRS-PUB/inrs01.nsf/inrs01_search_view_view/A0A1637F2D6AA087C1256F8E00511B81/$FILE/ed933.pdf [in French]

2004

CIS 06-1044
Health and Safety Executive
Maintaining portable electrical equipment in hotels and tourist accommodation
This booklet describes basic precautions for ensuring the safety of portable electrical equipment in hotels and tourist accommodation. Presented in the form of answers to frequently-asked questions, it addresses the following issues: types of portable electrical equipment; potential hazards; visual inspection of damage; electrical knowledge; equipment inspection and testing; testing intervals; record keeping. Reprint of CIS 03-557 with updated references.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, 2004. 9p. Illus.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg237.pdf [in English]

CIS 06-873 Guidelines on occupational safety and health in the service sector
Safety guide to health and safety in the service sector. Contents: staff training (by risk type); kitchens (particular hazards of restaurant, catering and hotel work); work environment and welfare; public/government, financial and professional services.
Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Ministry of Human Resources, Aras 2, 3 dan 4, Blok D3, Parcel D, Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan, 62502 Putrajaya, Malaysia, 2004. iii, 121p.
http://dosh.mohr.gov.my/koperat/G-PANDUAN%20PDF/GUIDE-services_sector-undp04(I).pdf [in English]

CIS 05-135 Howard M., Galbraith A.
Health and Safety Executive
Occupational health and safety enforcement strategies to promote concordance in the hospitality industry
This report examines safety and health management systems in restaurant and catering kitchens. The safety culture of these organizations is considered in detail with special reference made to the position and influence of the chef on safety practices. It was found that, in the workplaces examined, the chef was pivotal in establishing the climate and thus the safety culture. In organizations where the chef had a positive attitude to safety, safety culture was good. It is concluded that if enforcement agencies are to maximize compliance in this sector, they must appreciate and recognize the special role of the chef in kitchen workplaces, especially in determining safety climate. It follows that the restaurant sector may require a tailored approach to enforcement if compliance strategies are to be optimized.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, 2004. iv, 81p. 42 ref. Price: GBP 15.00. Downloadable version free of charge.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrpdf/rr259.pdf [in English]

CIS 03-1855
Health and Safety Executive
Gas safety in catering and hospitality
This information sheet is aimed at catering and hospitality businesses and contains guidance on safety during the installation, use and maintenance of gas-fired equipment used for cooking. Contents: responsibilities of landlords, catering business owners and gas appliance installers; United Kingdom regulations and standards applicable to new and existing installations; ventilation; mobile equipment and mobile catering; carbon monoxide alarms; blowtorches; ventilation.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Jan. 2004. 6p. Illus. 6 ref.

2003

CIS 11-0438 Quiles M.C., Coubes S., Erandorena J.J.
Direction Régionale du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Formation Professionnelle d'Aquitaine, Caisse Régionale d'Assurance Maladie d'Aquitaine, eds.
Practical guide to ergonomics in the hotel and catering sectors
Guide pratique de l'ergonomie dans l'hôtellerie et la restauration [in French]
This booklet presents the proposed ergonomic approach for the French hotel and catering sectors, aimed not only at helping to comply with current regulations, but also to sustainably adopt or improve working conditions and safety among workers and enterprises. Contents: definition of ergonomic approach; target objectives (improving working conditions, evaluation of occupational hazards, improving clients' well-being); technical tools and external resources.
Francois-Tourisme-Consultants, 10 rue Jean Moulin, 24750 Perigueux-Trelissac, France, 2003. 62p. Illus. 24 ref.
Guide_pratique.pdf [in French]

CIS 05-214 Ballue C., Lavergne G., Vernois G.
Delivery of beverages in cafés, hotels, restaurants and discotheques
Livraisons de boissons dans les cafés, hôtels, restaurants et discothèques [in French]
This guide covers client-supplier relationships in the distribution of beverages other than to individual homes. It is aimed at managers of cafés, hotels, restaurants and discotheques. It complements the guide entitled "Distribution of beverages for consumption other than in individual homes" ("La distribution de boissons en consommation hors domicile", INRS ED 892). Contents: duties and responsibilities of managers; occupational safety and health issues; good occupational safety and health practices in client-supplier relationships.
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Sep. 2003. 6p. Illus. 10 ref. Price: EUR 1.50. Downloadable version free.
http://www.inrs.fr/inrs-pub/inrs01.nsf/inrs01_search_view_view/2EE8E4E9DB4EAEAAC1256DC6003FB947/$FILE/ed915.pdf [in French]

CIS 05-118 Casarotto R.A., Mendes L.F.
Complaints, occupational diseases and occupational accidents among industrial canteen workers
Queixas, doenças ocupacionais e acidentes de trabalho em trabalhadores de cozinhas industriais [in Portuguese]
The purpose of this study was to examine complaints and the prevalence of occupational diseases, occupational accidents and musculoskeletal disorders among workers in five industrial canteens. It involved 257 workers, who were evaluated using different methods: interviews, questionnaires, task analysis and the NIOSH method. The most common occupational diseases were musculoskeletal disorders and backache, while the most frequent occupational accidents were cuts (36%) and commuting accidents (31%). An ergonomic analysis highlighted the following problems: noise, hot and humid working environments, poor workplace layout, unsuitable tools and equipment, poor work postures, poor work organization and excessive manual lifting.
Revista brasileira de saúde ocupacional, 2003, Vol.28, No.107/108, p.119-126. Illus. 29 ref.

CIS 04-35 Good ergonomic work practices for the hotel industry
Many jobs in the hotel industry present risks of strain on the back or other parts of the body. Poor work postures may arise due to ignorance or to poorly-designed workstations. Besides awkward postures, risk factors include manual handling, prolonged standing and repetitive movements. This booklet contains illustrations that show good and bad ergonomics or postures for bellmen, front desk staff, room attendants, waiters, kitchen staff and laundry workers.
Ministry of Manpower, Occupational Health Department, 18 Havelock Road, Singapore 059764, Republic of Singapore, Feb. 2003. 27p. Illus.

CIS 03-1788 Johnsson T., Tuomi T., Hyvärinen M., Svinhufvud J., Rothberg M., Reijula K.
Occupational exposure of non-smoking restaurant personnel to environmental tobacco smoke in Finland
Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure levels in different restaurant types in Finland were assessed before the National Tobacco Act restricting smoking in restaurants was activated. Exposure to ETS was determined by measuring nicotine in the breathing zone of non-smoking restaurant workers and by quantification of the nicotine metabolites cotinine and 3-hydroxycotinine in the urine of these workers during a whole work week. Altogether 23 workers from 15 restaurants were included in the study. The geometric mean (GM) breathing-zone nicotine level was 3.9µg/m3. The GM cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine level in urine were 3.3ng/mg(creatinine) and 15.3ng/mg(creatinine), respectively. The exposure to ETS of restaurant workers in dining restaurants was clearly lower than that of workers in pubs and nightclubs as indicated by all ETS-markers used in the present study. During the work week, the cotinine and 3'-hydroxycotinine levels in urine of the study subjects increased. The correlation between breathing zone nicotine and urine cotinine and hydroxycotinine was 0.66 for both compounds. Post-shift cotinine and hydroxycotinine levels were not significantly higher than pre-shift levels. The study indicates that measures to restrict ETS exposure in restaurants are needed.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 2003, Vol.43, No.5, p.523-531. Illus. 56 ref.

CIS 03-1985 Hoel H., Einarsen S.
Violence at work in hotels, catering and tourism
Violence and stress at work are more prevalent in the service sector than in most others, because they arise from the contact between workers and the public and/or the customer. This working paper is a review of the literature on violence at work in hotels, catering and tourism. Contents: definitions; working conditions which may be conducive to violence and stress at work; vulnerable groups of workers; occurrence of violence and stress; economic impact of violence and stress; causes of stress; causes of sexual harassment; causes of violence and bullying (including the role of alcohol and drugs); under-reporting of violence; prevention, reduction, management and coping strategies.
ILO Publications, International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 2003. iii, 35p. 106 ref.
http://www.ilo.org/public/english/dialogue/sector/papers/tourism/wp211.pdf [in English]

CIS 03-1839
Health and Safety Executive
Safe use of cleaning chemicals in the hospitality industry
Many different types of hazardous cleaning chemicals are used in the hospitality industry. This information sheet gives guidance to reduce the risk of accidental injury or ill health at work. Contents: health hazards due to contact with the skin or eyes, inhalation and swallowing; three case studies of typical accidents and appropriate prevention measures; legal requirements applying to the use of cleaning chemicals; risk assessment in 12 steps to be carried out by the employer; guidance for employees.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Oct. 2003. 4p. 5 ref.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais22.pdf [in English]

CIS 03-1675 Svendsen K., Sjaastad A.K., Sivertsen I.
Respiratory symptoms in kitchen workers
To study the possible association between cooking fumes and respiratory diseases other than cancer, all employees in 67 restaurant kitchens were asked to answer a questionnaire regarding the presence of dyspnoea, serious dyspnoea, cough and respiratory symptoms in connection with work. The study group consisted of 139 women and 100 men. The prevalence of dyspnoea (relative risk RR=4.1), serious dyspnoea (RR=2.9) and symptoms in connection with work (RR=4.3) were significantly higher for women kitchen workers compared to unexposed controls selected from the general population. Among the men, only dyspnoea (RR=1.8) and symptoms in connection with work (RR=2.1) showed an increased prevalence. An analysis of possible predictors for respiratory symptoms in connection with work gave an odds ratio of 3.2 for "working in a restaurant kitchen."
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Apr. 2003, Vol.43, No.4, p.436-439. 18 ref.

CIS 03-1232 Bruneteau P., Delevoye A., Demeester E., Hunzinger E., Ribes M.L., Roux F., Van Brederode A., Havart C.
Restaurant dishwashers: Metrological studies
Plongeur en restauration. Etudes métrologiques [in French]
This study on the dishwashing occupation was carried out in a large enterprise canteen serving 1200-1300 meals each day and employing 34 persons, including seven dishwashers. The study was carried out between April 2001 and April 2002 and focussed on the three hazards considered the most critical, namely noise, physical workload and the risk of onset of musculoskeletal diseases. Data were collected by means of two questionnaires, one addressed to the restaurant manager, the other to the concerned staff. Sonometry and sound dosimetry measurements were carried out in the dishwashing area. Physical workload was evaluated by measurements of heart rate. Muscular effort and awkward articular postures were evaluated from video recordings. Several ergonomic and working condition improvements were recommended on the basis of this project. An occupational medicine data sheet on the dishwashing occupation is included in the form of an insert. Contents: characteristics of the occupation; risk factors and constraints; hazard evaluation methods; health effects and occupational pathology; prevention; medical supervision; regulations.
Cahiers de médecine interprofessionnelle, 2003, Vol.43, No.3, p.281-289. Illus. 14 ref. + Insert 2p.

2002

CIS 04-108 Sivertsen I., Sjaastad A.K., Svendsen K., Krøkje Å.
Alveolar macrophages as biomarkers of pulmonary irritation in kitchen workers
Alveolar macrophages (AM) are used as biomarkers of pulmonary irritation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a co-variation between the number of AM and exposure to cooking fumes. The study group consisted of 35 persons working in kitchens preparing hot meals, and 27 unexposed controls. The exposed group was further divided into highly- and slightly-exposed persons according to the levels of fat aerosols and aldehydes in the working atmosphere. The number of AM was counted in smears prepared from expectorate samples from each participant. Samples were taken on three different days. Highly-exposed persons had a higher number of AM in their samples than both slightly-exposed persons and unexposed persons. Highly-exposed smokers had a statistically significantly higher number of AM compared with both slightly-exposed and unexposed smokers, suggesting a synergistic effect between occupational exposure to cooking fumes and smoking.
Annals of Occupational Hygiene, Nov. 2002, Vol.46, No.8, p.713-717. 22 ref.

CIS 03-1783 Svendsen K., Jensen H.N., Sivertsen I., Sjaastad A.K.
Exposure to cooking fumes in restaurant kitchens in Norway
Personal air sampling was carried out among kitchen workers of four hotels, two fast-food restaurants, ten traditional restaurants and three small local restaurants serving mostly fried food. Each subject carried two sampling devices connected to pumps. One pump was connected to a filter cassette with a 37mm glass fibre filter and the other to a sampling device for aldehydes. The measurements were repeated during three days in each kitchen. The level of fat aerosols varied between the different types of kitchen. Overall exposure levels to fat aerosols were low, but in some cases was up to 50% of the Norwegian threshold limit value (TLV) for dust (10mg/m3). The levels of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein were well below the TLVs. However, aerosols of fat produced during frying contain a mixture of fat from the meat being fried, hydrolyzed vegetable fat and degradation products, such as fatty acids, other organic acids and aldehydes. Consequently, cooking fumes should be considered as being harmful to the lungs.
Annals of Occupational Hygiene, June 2002, vol.46, No.4, p.395-400. 17 ref.

CIS 03-1708
Health and Safety Executive
Slips and trips: Summary guidance for the catering industry
Slips account for about 86% of the total slip and trip accidents. In 90% of the cases, the floor is wet. This information sheet lists the various causes of slips and trips (environmental, organizational, individual or shoe factors) and practical measures for slip risk control in each situation. Reprinted with updated references (replaces CIS 01-251).
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, June 2002. 4p. 2 ref.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais6.pdf [in English]

CIS 03-557
Health and Safety Executive
Maintaining portable electrical equipment in hotels and tourist accommodation
This booklet describes basic precautions for ensuring the safety of portable electrical equipment in hotels and tourist accommodation. Presented in the form of answers to frequently-asked questions, it addresses the following issues: types of portable electrical equipment; potential hazards; visual inspection of damage; electrical knowledge; equipment inspection and testing; testing intervals; record keeping. Reprint of CIS 97-975 with updated references.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Nov. 2002. 9p. Illus. 4 ref.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg237.pdf [in English]

CIS 03-243 Grimaud I., Henri-Bonneville S.C., Richoux C.
Table service in restaurants: Work constraints and considerations on the future of this occupation
Le service à table dans la restauration: contraintes d'emploi et réflexions sur l'avenir de la profession [in French]
In traditional restaurants, guests are served at their table by waiters or waitresses. This service to patrons represents strenuous work, physically, psychologically and from the standpoint of working hours. This article presents the results of a survey on the health of these employees, aimed at highlighting the constraints that are inherent to this sector as well as the factors to be taken into consideration for improving working conditions. A total of 131 employees accepted to take part in this questionnaire survey. Data were collected on the following aspects of their work: demographic factors (age, sex); tenure; number of children; commuting time; working hours; constraints at the workplace. This survey made it possible to highlight some of the constraints and to suggest improvements in working conditions. The questionnaire is included as an appendix.
Documents pour le médecin du travail, 3rd Quarter 2002, No.91, p.259-268. Illus. 6 ref.

CIS 02-1937 Schärer L., Hafner J., Wüthrich B., Bucher C.
Occupational protein contact dermatitis from shrimps - A new presentation of the crustacean-mite syndrome
A 45-year-old Chinese cook, with no family or personal history of atopy, had had hand eczema of variable intensity since he had started working in Switzerland 10 years ago. The patient reported acute itching, burning and erythematous swelling about 20min after contact with shrimps. This was followed approximately 2 days later by the appearance of erythema and small vesicles, changing to the typical features of hand eczema after a few days with erythematous and hyperkeratotic skin lesions restricted to the palms. Additionally, when eating shrimps he felt itching of the fingertips. He denied any respiratory symptoms. The skin lesions fully cleared during holidays. Sensitization of the immediate type to crustaceans and house dust mite was demonstrated by skin tests as well as with specific IgE determination. Delayed- type sensitization to shrimps was demonstrable by patch testing. A biopsy taken from the positive patch test site showed an acute eczematous reaction. In CAP FEIA inhibition studies, complete cross-reactivity between D. pteronyssinus and shrimps was demonstrated.
Contact Dermatitis, Mar. 2002, Vol.46, No.3, p.181-182. Illus. 10 ref.

CIS 02-1636 Cloutier E., Lefebvre S., Ledoux E., Chatigny C., St-Jacques Y.
Occupational safety and health issues associated with knowledge transfer: Case of machinists and cooks
Enjeux de santé et de sécurité au travail dans la transmission des savoirs professionnels: le cas des usineurs et des cuisiniers [in French]
The aim of this study was to develop a better understanding of the occupational safety and health issues related to knowledge transfer in occupational settings. A first phase of the study consisted in taking stock of the current situation of apprenticeship within enterprises with the Quebec employment agency (Emploi-Québec). The study then focused on two high-risk occupations, cooks and machinists. It was conducted within two enterprises and involved discussions with managers, trade union representatives, skilled workers and apprentices. As highlighted by the two case studies, the issue of transmission of knowledge is mutli-faceted and complex. It is important that the assignment of tasks takes into account the age and experience of the workers. Furthermore, numerous organizational and environmental factors influence the way in which knowledge transmission occurs. Proposals for further studies are made, together with recommendations addressed to Emploi-Québec for facilitating apprenticeships in enterprises.
Institut de recherche en santé et en sécurité du travail du Québec (IRSST), 505 boul. de Maisonneuve Ouest, Montreal (Quebec) H3A 3C2, Canada, Oct. 2002. x, 205p. Illus. 76 ref.
http://www.irsst.qc.ca/htmfr/pdf_txt/R-316.pdf [in French]

CIS 02-1887 Moschandreas D.J., Chu P.
Occupant perception of indoor air and comfort in four hospitality environments
This article reports on a survey of customer and staff perceptions of indoor air quality at two restaurants, a billiard hall and a casino. The survey was conducted at each environment for eight days: two weekend days on two consecutive weekends and four weekdays. Occupant perception of environmental, comfort and physical variables was measured using a questionnaire. Significant differences of occupant environment perception were identified among customers and staff. The acceptability of the environment was found to be affected by temperature, occupant density, occupant smoking status, odour perception, health conditions, sensitivity to chemicals and enjoyment of activities.
AIHA Journal, Jan.-Feb. 2002, Vol.63, No.1, p.47-54. Illus. 15 ref.

CIS 02-93 Food service workers safety guide
This guide is aimed at all persons working in food preparation and service organizations such as hotels, restaurants, catering facilities and fast food establishments. It replaces an earlier edition analysed under CIS 01-1010. Its objective is to enable persons working in restaurants and related establishments to recognize workplace hazards, prevent accidents and injuries by safe work practices and use of personal protective equipment, deal with accidents and emergencies and understand their duties and rights under occupational safety and health legislation. A list of addresses of government departments that can be contacted for additional information is also included. Document also available in French at CCOHS.
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, 250 Main Street East, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 1H6, Canada, 2002. 129p. Illus. Price: CAD 10.00 (Canada); USD 10.00 (elsewhere).

2001

CIS 02-1249 Bauer A., Kelterer D., Stadeler M., Schneider W., Kleesz P., Wollina U., Elsner P.
The prevention of occupational hand dermatitis in bakers, confectioners and employees in the catering trades - Preliminary results of a skin prevention program
Bakers, confectioners and employees in the catering trades are at a high risk of developing occupational skin diseases (OSDs). A skin disease prevention programme in the baking, hotel and catering industries was initiated. It involved a detailed analysis of the occupational exposure and occupational disease history of the employees, during which the patients' diagnosis and therapy was re-evaluated and supplemented if necessary. Individual skin care and protection regimes were demonstrated, skin care and protection products were supplied, and skin care and protection seminars were offered to volunteering participants. From January to December 1999, 29 affected employees were examined. 22 employees suffered from irritant contact dermatitis. In the follow-up of 11 employees, the skin disease improved or disappeared in 8 cases. Moreover, in 1 employee, the skin condition was stabilized even though continued employment. In only 2 cases did the skin condition worsen. These preliminary results showed that most of the OSD were due to lack of or unsuitable skin care and protection.
Contact Dermatitis, Feb. 2001, Vol.44, No.2, p.85-88. Illus. 24 ref.

CIS 02-1301
Health and Safety Executive
Health and safety of children and young people in catering
This information sheet is aimed at employers in the catering industry and outlines safety and health law specifically covering workers not having reached the age of adulthood. There are many young workers in the catering industry, often on a casual or temporary basis, or on work experience schemes, and they are at a greater risk of injury. Contents include: legal responsibilities of employers; risk assessment and control measures; employment of young workers; information that needs given to parents or guardians; supervision and working times.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Oct. 2001. 4p. 6 ref.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais21.pdf [in English]

CIS 02-1300
Health and Safety Executive
Health and safety for waiting staff
This information sheet is aimed at employers in the catering industry and contains practical advice on how to reduce safety and health risks associated with waiting work. Contents include: employer's responsibilities; applicability of the guidance to temporary staff; special considerations relating to one-time venues or events; comprehensive check-list for briefing staff and for use as a reminder of good practice.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Aug. 2001. 4p. 4 ref.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais20.pdf [in English]

CIS 02-1299
Health and Safety Executive
Reporting accidents in the catering industry
The purpose of this information sheet is to explain the main requirements of the British Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1985 (RIDDOR) (see CIS 88-1753) as they apply to the catering industry. It provides several examples of reportable and non-reportable incidents. Contents include: what needs to be reported, and who is responsible for making the report; reportable accidents to members of the public; reportable violence to staff; reportable accidents to contractors; definitions of "major injuries" and "over-three-day injuries" under the regulations; other categories of incidents that need to be reported; when and how to report; whom to report to; records that need to be kept.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Apr. 2001. 4p. 3 ref.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais18.pdf [in English]

CIS 02-1298
Health and Safety Executive
Safety during emptying and cleaning of fryers
Accidents during the emptying and cleaning of fryers are a major cause of burns suffered by employees in the restaurant industry. This information sheet provides guidance on how to empty and clean fryers safely. Contents include: list of main hazards; when to empty and clean; proper sequence for oil draining; cleaning procedures; training of employees. This information sheet replaces the one already analysed under CIS 00-1375. The main difference lies in the recommended time for heating cold oil to enable draining. It is now one minute as opposed to "several minutes" in the earlier version.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Feb. 2001. 2p. 4 ref.
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais17.pdf [in English]

CIS 02-791 Álvarez-Cuesta C.C., Vázquez López F., Raya Aguado C., González López M.A., Pérez Oliva N.
Allergic contact dermatitis from colophonium in the sawdust of Asturian cider-bars
Case report of sensitization dermatitis in a young part-time worker, whose job was to spread saw dust on the floor of a Spanish cider bar to keep it dry. Skin tests showed a positive reaction to pine dust, which is a known source of sensitization to colophony.
Contact Dermatitis, July 2001, Vol.45, No.1, p.57. 7 ref.

CIS 01-813
Health and Safety Executive
Health and safety of new and expectant mothers in the catering industry
This information sheet provides guidance to employers in the catering industry on the implications of current United Kingdom legislation applicable to new or expectant mothers. Contents include: legal duties and their practical application; the most common risks and the corresponding precautions; night work; involvement of the employee's general practitioner; model of a letter to be addressed to employees; specific issues relating to workers employed through agencies.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Mar. 2001. 2p. 4 ref.

2000

CIS 01-478
Health and Safety Executive
Maintenance priorities in catering
This information note is aimed as persons responsible for managing the maintenance of equipment and premises in catering; it highlights priority areas based on accident experience. Main topics covered: accidents due to poor maintenance; management of maintenance; different types of maintenance (cleaning, routine checks, planned maintenance, breakdown maintenance, inspections and tests); hygiene measures for food safety.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Apr. 2000. 4p. 10 ref.

CIS 01-473
Health and Safety Executive
Manual handling in the catering industry
Almost one fifth of reportable accidents involving persons who work in the catering industry are caused my manual handling. Aimed at employers and self-employed persons in the catering industry, this information sheet offers guidance on practical measures to reduce the risks of injury. Topics covered: United Kingdom legislation; risk factors, including tasks, loads, working environment and clothing; practical measures to control risk, including avoiding manual tasks, using mechanical aids, re-designing individual tasks, making loads easier to handle and improving workplace conditions; information and training.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Apr. 2000. 2p. 4 ref.

CIS 01-480
Health and Safety Executive
Safety signs in the catering industry
This information sheet presents the safety signs the catering premises need to display depending on the risks present. Main safety signs that are required are: wet floors; storage of harmful chemicals; fire exit signs; fire fighting signs; first aid location; gas pipes and LPG cylinder stores; fragile roofs. Commercially bought and self-made signs should comply with the Health and Safety (Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996 (see CIS 96-392). Catering establishments should check their existing signs to ensure that they are correct, suitably located, clean and durable and that the lighting of illuminated signs is regularly checked.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Aug. 2000. 3p. Illus. 5 ref.

CIS 01-126
Health and Safety Executive
Health and safety training pays in the catering industry: Guidance for owners and managers
This information sheet gives practical advice on how employers can meet their legal obligations to provide information and training on health and safety. It defines who should be trained, and when, and the main topics to be covered by the training: slips, trips and falls; contact with hot surfaces; being struck by an object; handling of knives; handling heavy loads; safe use of equipment; safe procedures; accident reporting. Replaces CIS 95-2117.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Jan. 2000. 4p. 14 ref.

CIS 01-125
Health and Safety Executive
An index of health and safety guidance in the catering industry
This information sheet provides a list of guidance material on safety and health in the catering industry in the United Kingdom under the following headings: management of health and safety; principal risks (slips, manual handling and upper limb disorders, dermatitis, exposure to hazardous substances, machinery, transport, electricity, noise). The document does not cover fire safety, and hygiene is included only where it overlaps with safety and health. (Replaces CIS 97-860).
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Jan. 2000. 4p. 80 ref.

CIS 01-124
Health and Safety Executive
The main health and safety law applicable to catering
This information sheet provides advice to employers, employees, self-employed persons, suppliers and landlords involved in the catering industry in the United Kingdom. Contents: general duties and responsibilities, regulations affecting staff, safety in the premises, safety of equipment, safety of electrical and gas systems, and procedures for hazardous activities.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Feb. 2000. 4p. 29 ref.

CIS 00-1375
Health and Safety Executive
Safety during emptying and cleaning of fryers
Accidents during the emptying and cleaning of fryers are a major cause of burns suffered by employees in the restaurant industry. This information sheet provides guidance on how to empty and clean fryers safely. Contents include: list of main hazards; when to empty and clean; proper sequence for oil draining; cleaning procedures; training of employees.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Oct. 2000. 2p. 4 ref.

1999

CIS 03-703 Restaurants, bars and cafeterias
Restaurantes, bares y cafeterías [in Spanish]
This guide in the form of check lists of potential hazards in restaurants, bars and cafeterias and corresponding prevention elements is aimed at managers of small enterprises. Contents: workplaces and equipment; electrical hazards; harmful chemicals; biological agents; fires and explosions; workplace design; work organization; legislation; risk assessment methods.
Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1999. 33p. Illus.
http://internet.mtas.es/Insht/practice/gap_011.pdf [in Spanish]

CIS 01-1531 Crépy M.N.
Contact dermatitis from proteins - An underestimated occupational skin disease
Dermatite de contact aux protéines - Une dermatose professionnelle sous-estimée [in French]
Occupational contact dermatitis from proteins concerns mainly workers in restaurants, in the food industry or in contact with animals. Responsible substances can include protein-rich fruit and vegetables, animal proteins, flour and enzymes. Contents: physiopathology; diagnosis in an occupational setting; diagnosis techniques (skin tests, IgE determination); prevention; compensation.
Documents pour le médecin du travail, 3rd Quarter 1999, No.79, p.249-253. 31 ref.

CIS 01-1475 Louis F., Guez M., Le Bâcle C.
Poisoning from carbon dioxide inhalation
Intoxication par inhalation de dioxyde de carbone [in French]
A case of collective carbon dioxide (CO2) poisoning which occurred in a fast-food restaurant in the Seine-Saint-Denis department of France (near Paris) provides an opportunity to restate the importance of remaining vigilant with respect to this hazard. Indeed, ignorance of this hazard may prove to be fatal to exposed persons, while the conditions under which this colourless and odourless gas is produced or used in occupational settings have been known for a long time. Contents include: toxicity of CO2; sources of exposure; descriptions of CO2 poisonings; preventing the CO2 exposure risk.
Documents pour le médecin du travail, 3rd Quarter 1999, No.79, p.179-194. 52 ref.

CIS 00-443 Hendricks K.J., Layne L.A.
Adolescent occupational injuries in fast food restaurants: An examination of the problem from a national perspective
Work injuries to adolescents are most prevalent in the retail trades industry, with a large portion occurring in eating and drinking establishments. Data for nonfatal injuries to adolescents, ages 14 through 17, injured while working in fast food restaurants in the United States between 1992 and 1994 were examined. There were an estimated 27,997 adolescent injuries in fast food restaurants during this period. The injury rate for eating and drinking establishments in the 15 through 17 age group was higher than for all other industries combined. This study identifies the fast food industry as the source of a large proportion of occupational injuries to adolescents, and indicates that task-specific risk factors seem to be strongly related to sex.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dec. 1999, Vol.41, No.12, p.1146-1153. Illus. 31 ref.

CIS 99-1720 Milburn P.D., Barrett R.S.
Lumbosacral loads in bedmaking
The effect of bed size and bed height on the physical stress of employees responsible for room cleaning and bedmaking in the hospitality industry was investigated. Results confirmed the view that static models severely underestimate the loads on the lumbar spine under inertial lifting conditions. They also indicated that: 1) tasks with the greatest hand loads were not necessarily associated with the greatest spinal loads due to differences in the way each task was performed; 2) loads produced during bedmaking may exceed recommended safe lifting limits for certain task-size-height combinations; and 3) the use of larger and heavier beds in the hospitality industry imposes increased loads on the lumbar spine. Topics: bending posture; body mechanics; dynamic muscular work; ergonomic evaluation; hotel industry; job study; measurement of load on joints; measurement of load on muscles; static muscular work; women.
Applied Ergonomics, June 1999, Vol.30, No.3, p.263-273. Illus. 46 ref.

1998

CIS 04-140 Serwałski Z., Wieczorek Z., Augustyńska D., Drygała M., Gierasimiuk J., Konarska M., Pośniak M.
Occupational safety and health in small business - Occupational safety and health in restaurants - OSH check list; Employers' guide
Bezpieczeństwo i higiena pracy w małych przedsiębiorstwach - Bezpieczeństwo i higiena pracy w restauracjach - Lista kontrolna bhp; Poradnik pracodawcy [in Polish]
The check list for the evaluation of occupational safety and health in restaurants is designed for use in conjunction with the corresponding employer's guide. It lists the potential hazards that may be found in these workplaces and provides suggestions for their control or elimination. It also contains a list of relevant Polish legislation and technical standards.
Centralny Instytut Ochrony Pracy, ul. Czerniakowska 16, 00-701 Warszawa, Poland, 1998. 26+35p. 61 ref.

CIS 01-1010 Food service workers' safety guide
This guide is aimed at all persons working in food preparation and service organizations such as hotels, restaurants, catering facilities and fast food establishments. Its objective is to enable persons working in restaurants and related establishments to recognize workplace hazards, prevent accidents and injuries by safe work practices and use of personal protective equipment, deal with accidents and emergencies and understand their duties and rights under occupational safety and health legislation. A list of addresses of government departments that can be contacted for additional information is also included.
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, 250 Main Street East, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 1H6, Canada, 2nd ed., 1998. 102p. Illus. Price: CAD 10.00 (Canada); USD 10.00 (elsewhere).

CIS 01-251
Health and Safety Executive
Slips and trips: Summary guidance for catering industry
Slips account for about 86% of the total slips and trips. In 90% of the cases, the floor is wet. This information sheet lists the various causes of slips and trips (environmental, organizational, individual or shoe factors) and practical measures for slip risk control in each situation. Replaces CIS 97-656.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 2WA, United Kingdom, Sep. 1998. 4p. 1 ref.

CIS 99-1741 Leather P., Lawrence C., Beale D., Cox T., Dickson R.
Exposure to occupational violence and the buffering effects of intra-organizational support
The effects of exposure to a variety of forms of work-related violence upon work attitudes and general well-being were investigated within a sample of UK public house licensees (individuals who manage public houses and hold the licence permitting the sale of alcoholic drinks on the premises). In addition, the role of social support in moderating such effects was examined. Based on a sample of 242 licensees, there was a consistent interaction between exposure to such violence and the availability of perceived intra-organizational support in determining the size of any negative effects upon individual well-being, job satisfaction and organizational commitment. It is argued that exposure to all forms of work-related violence, including intimidation, verbal abuse and threat, should be seen as a potential stressor within the work environment, the negative effects of which are buffered by perceived support from within the organization, but not by that perceived to be available from informal sources such as family and friends. Topics: anxiety; depressive neurosis; hotel industry; human behaviour; human relations; job dissatisfaction; questionnaire survey; social aspects; stress factors; violence; waiters, waitresses and bartenders.
Work and Stress, Apr.-June 1998, Vol.12, No.2, p.161-178. Illus. 68 ref.

CIS 99-849 Dunlea V., Farr T.
Occupational health and safety performance in the hospitality industry: An audit of small business
Occupational safety and health (OSH) performance was audited in 50 hospitality businesses with less than 100 employees in Queensland, Australia. OSH performance was generally poor across all sectors at the strategic, management and operational levels. Management commitment at the strategic and management levels appeared to be a key factor in the operational success of reducing the risk of injury or illness to workers or patrons. Topics: Australia; hotel industry; information of personnel; plant safety and health organization; role of management; safety and health training; small enterprises.
Journal of Occupational Health and Safety - Australia and New Zealand, Oct. 1998, Vol.14, No.5, p.465-471. Illus. 2 ref.

1997

CIS 98-659 Chautard G., Cuvillier F., Grimaud I., Richoux C.
Work in the fast-food sector in Paris
Le travail dans la restauration rapide à Paris [in French]
Topics: conditions of work; fatigue; France; functional nervous disorders; hotel industry; housekeeping and restaurant services workers; job dissatisfaction; questionnaire survey; sleep disturbances; stress factors; work organization; work time schedules.
Documents pour le médecin du travail, 4th Quarter 1997, No.72, p.337-346. Illus. 7 ref.

CIS 98-673 New technologies and working conditions in the hotel, catering and tourism sector
Les nouvelles technologies et les conditions de travail dans le secteur de l'hôtellerie, de la restauration et du tourisme [in French]
Topics: computer applications; conditions of work; cooking; hotel industry; ILO; industrial relations; report; technical development; telecommunications equipment; vocational training.
ILO Publications, International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 1997. iv, 86p. Illus. 51 ref. Price: CHF 17.50.

< previous | 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 | next >