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Arsenic and compounds - 236 entries found

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  • Arsenic and compounds

1993

CIS 93-1446 Arsenic trioxide
International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: delayed effects; irritation of eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the kidneys, liver and the cardiovascular, nervous and haematopoietic systems. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the lungs, skin, bone marrow, peripheral vascular and nervous systems, the heart function, and the kidneys and liver; human carcinogen; may cause birth defects. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as As): 0.2mg/m3 (ACGIH 1989-1990).
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p.

CIS 93-1445 Arsenic pentoxide
International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: delayed effects; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the kidneys, liver and the cardiovascular, nervous and blood systems. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the lungs, skin, bone marrow, the cardiovascular and nervous systems and other organs; human carcinogen; may cause antifertility effects. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as As): 0.2mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991).
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p.

CIS 93-898 Chia S.E., Phoon W.H., Lee H.S., Tan K.T., Jeyaratnam J.
Exposure to neurotoxic metals among workers in Singapore: An overview
The extent of occupational exposure to inorganic lead, manganese, arsenic and inorganic mercury in Singapore was determined from the results of Statutory Medical Examinations and environmental monitoring carried out by the Department of Industrial Health in 1989. There were 786 workers exposed to lead. Of these, 7.8% had blood levels greater than 40µg/dL. There were 67 workers exposed to mercury, 11.9% of whom had urinary mercury levels greater than 50µg/L. There were 101 and 144 workers exposed to arsenic and manganese respectively. None of the biological samples exceeded the health-based limits. A review of local studies showed that some of the exposed workers had neurophysiological and neurobehavioural changes.
Occupational Medicine, Feb. 1993, Vol.43, No.1, p.18-22. 23 ref.

1992

CIS 02-63 Arsenic and its inorganic compounds
Arsenic et composés minéraux [in French]
Chemical safety information sheet. Update of data sheet already summarized in CIS 83-1939. Acute toxicity: digestive disorders, blood pressure drop and death (ingestion, severe form); encephalopathy, cardiovascular disorders, hepatonephritis, coagulation disorders, alopecia; polyneuritis, skin disorders (ingestion, less severe forms); irritation of the skin and respiratory tract; ocular burns. Chronic toxicity: carcinogen (lung and skin cancer); skin disorders; mucous membrane damage; alopecia; sensorimotor polyneuritis; haematological effects; digestive, renal, hepatic and cardiovascular disorders. Exposure limits. TWA = USA, ACGIH 1991, arsenic and its soluble compounds: 0.2mgAs/m3; France, lead arseniate: 0.15mgPb/m3. EEC number and mandatory labelling codes: No.033-001-00-x (arsenic), No.033-002-00 (arsenic compounds except diarsenic trioxide); T, R23/25, S1/2, S20/21, S28, S44. Complete datasheet collection on CD-ROM analysed under CIS 01-201.
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Rev.ed., CD-ROM CD 613, 2001. 6p. Illus. 21 ref.

CIS 96-1827
International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS)
Inorganic arsenic compounds other than arsine - Health and safety guide
This document provides a hazard evaluation of inorganic arsenic compounds based on critical national reviews, along with practical guidance on exposure limitation. Contents: identity and uses; health hazards (fatal poisoning, human carcinogen); guidance on hazard prevention and protection, first aid, explosion and fire hazards, storage and transport, spillage and disposal; current regulations and standards.
World Health Organization, Distribution and Sales Service, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1992. 31p. Illus. 10 ref. Price: CHF 5.00 (CHF 3.50 in developing countries).

CIS 96-946 Maroni M.
Threshold limit values for chemicals in the workplace
Valori limite di esposizione ad agenti chimici negli ambienti di lavoro [in Italian]
Data sheets and toxicological profiles are presented for benzene, pentachlorophenol, arsenic, vanadium, tetraethyllead, tetramethyllead, xylene, toluene and cadmium. The information includes teratogenicity, mutagenicity, carcinogenic effects and threshold limit values (including those for the US and Italy) taken from the reviewed literature.
Prevenzione oggi, July-Sep. 1992, Vol.4, No.3, p.39-73. 69 ref.

CIS 94-301 Mora V., Pairon J.C., Garnier R., Laureillard J., Lionnet F., Hoguet L., Schaeffer A., Efthymiou M.L., Brochard P.
Acute arsine poisoning in a ferrous metal foundry: Report on two cases
Intoxication aiguë par l'hydrogène arsénié dans une fonderie de métaux ferreux. A propos de deux observations [in French]
Acute arsine poisoning was observed in 2 workers employed in a ferrous metal foundry. One presented an acute haemolysis with acute renal failure, requiring haemodialysis. Renal function slowly recovered but high blood pressure was observed secondarily. The 2nd case presented as predominantly cytolytic hepatitis on the 20th day after acute haemolysis. The evolution was rapidly resolutive, with no transfusion needed. The hypothesis of a causal role of arsine intoxication in this hepatitis is therefore possible. Subsequent atmospheric measurements in the workplace showed detectable amounts of arsine during the shovelling of the scories: results were < or equal to the threshold limit value when the operations were performed in dry conditions. In contrast, an atmospheric level of 60ppm was observed when water was added to the scories. This could be due to arsenical impurities present in ferrosilicium and calcium carbide used in the foundry. These observations underline the potential risk of arsine intoxication in such industries and raise the possibility of a delayed cytolytic hepatitis.
Archives des maladies professionnelles, 1992, Vol.53, No.3, p.167-173. Illus. 21 ref.

CIS 94-52 Arsenic
Arsenic [in French]
International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of eyes, skin and respiratory tract; hepatic and renal damage. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; skin damage; carcinogen; teratogen; neurotoxic effects. EC identification number and labelling codes: 033-001-00-X; Toxic; R23/24; S1/2-20/21-28-44. United Nations number and hazard class: UN 1558 (6.1; II).
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1992. 2p. Illus.

CIS 93-1314
Japan Industrial Hygiene Association
Criteria for tentative safe exposure levels on the 1992 exposure limit list [Japan]
Kyoyō nōdo zanteichi (1992) no teian riyū [in Japanese]
Review of relevant primary literature on arsine, silver and its compounds, chloromethyl methyl ether, cobalt and its compounds and toluene diisocyanate. Exposure limits established in other countries are discussed.
Japanese Journal of Industrial Health - Sangyō-Igaku, July 1992, Vol.34, No.4, p.385-396. 114 ref.

CIS 93-1204 Guindo Nignan M., Garnier R., Telolahy P., Auger J., Ditcharles D., Dossier E., Klein E., Nguyen-Auvier D., Renault B.
Urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic, methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in workers engaged in the production of gallium arsenide semi-conductors
Excrétion urinaire d'arsenic minéral, d'acide méthylarsonique et d'acide diméthylarsinique lors de la fabrication de micro-composants sur substrat d'arséniure de gallium [in French]
The determination of urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic methylarsonic acid (M.A.A.) and dimethylarsinic acid (D.M.A.) through direct hydride generation from urine is an easy, inexpensive and reliable method for the biological monitoring of workers exposed to inorganic arsenic. This method was used for the biological monitoring of 79 workers engaged in the manufacturing of gallium arsenide semi-conductors in 7 different plants. 238 urine samples were obtained. The results presented are in agreement with those of two similar studies of smaller groups of gallium arsenide-exposed workers. Increases in urinary inorganic arsenic, methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid concentrations were rare and always small. The mean total urinary arsenic concentration was low (<20µg/g creatinine); more than 90% of all measurements were consistent with dietary-only arsenic absorption; no-one showed inorganic arsenic absorption corresponding to an 8h TWA of 100µg/m3 or more (i.e. half the French TLV).
Archives des maladies professionnelles, 1992, Vol.53, No.5, p.375-381. Illus. 33 ref.

CIS 93-600 Hain E., Korallus U.
Lung cancer caused by arsenic-containing pyrites used in sulfuric acid production - An occupational problem carried over from past exposures
Lungenkrebs durch arsenhaltigen Schwefelkies bei der Schwefelsäureherstellung - ein arbeitsmedizinisches Altlasten-Problem [in German]
An increased incidence of bronchial cancer in sulfuric acid production plants became apparent in the Federal Republic of Germany in 1984. Only employees who had worked in the production plants before 1959 were found to be affected. The high exposure to arsenic-containing dusts before 1959 was identified as the cause of the elevated lung cancer incidence. It was due to open roasting of pyrite in manually operated single plate roasters and mechanically operated multiplate roasters, which were in use until 1959. The concentrations of arsenic were far in excess of the exposure limits. Review of the legal aspects of the problem and of compensation. Detailed summaries in English, French and German.
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz, Prophylaxe und Ergonomie, July 1992, Vol.42, No.7, p.266-276. Illus. 37 ref.

CIS 92-925 Demange M., Vien I., Hecht G., Héry M., Lagoutte A.
Development of a method for sampling arsenic trioxide
Mise au point d'une méthode de prélèvement du trioxyde de diarsenic [in French]
The development of a satisfactory method for sampling arsenic trioxide raises 2 problems: how to collect the particulate and gaseous fractions of As2O3 (which gives off gases at room temperature) while avoiding partial sublimation of the particles collected. The use of existing techniques (coated or non-coated quartz fibre filters; cellulose acetate membranes; activated charcoal) modified to take into account the particular characteristics of As2O3 has achieved some interesting results in industry.
Cahiers de notes documentaires - Sécurité et hygiène du travail, 1st Quarter 1992, No.146, Note No.1872-146-92, p.63-70. Illus.

1991

CIS 00-647 Ferric arsenite
Arsenito férrico [in Spanish]
Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 1241. International Chemical Safety Card. Short-term exposure: irritation of the skin, the eyes and the respiratory tract dermatitis; nervous system, liver, kidney and gastrointestinal tract impairment; exposure may lead to death. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis (greyish skin and hyperkeratosis); skin sensitization; nervous disorders; degenerative liver damage; nasal sinus perforation. Threshold limit value: 0.01mg/m3. Carcinogenic.
Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. Illus.

CIS 00-646 Arsenic
Arsénico [in Spanish]
Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 0013. International Chemical Safety Card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of eyes and respiratory tract; neurotoxic effects; circulatory system, kidney and gastrointestinal tract impairment, which may lead to serous haemorrhages, hypovolaemic shock and death. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; skin sensitization; neuropathy; pigmentation disorders; tissue changes. Threshold limit value: 0.01mg/m3. Arsenic is a carcinogen.
Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. Illus.

CIS 99-749 Arsenic trichloride
Tricloruro de arsénico [in Spanish]
Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 4-0221. International Chemical Safety Card. Topics: arsenic trichloride; carcinogens; cardiovascular diseases; caustic substances; chemical hazards; data sheet; elimination of spills; environmental pollution; explosion hazards; fire fighting; fire hazards; first aid; gastrointestinal diseases; haemorrhage; health hazards; hepatotoxic effects; IPCS; labelling; nephrotoxic effects; neurotoxic effects; pigmentation disorders; pulmonary oedema; skin absorption; Spain; storage; threshold limit values; translation; waste disposal.
Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p.

CIS 97-1799 Arsenic trioxide
Trióxido de diarsénico [in Spanish]
Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0378. International Chemical Safety Card. Short-term exposure effects: delayed effects; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the kidneys, liver and the cardiovascular, nervous and haematopoietic systems. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the lungs, skin, bone marrow, vascular and nervous systems, heart function, kidneys and liver; human carcinogen; may cause birth defects. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as As): 0.2mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991).
Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p.

CIS 95-1222 Arsenic pentoxide
Pentaóxido de diarsénico [in Spanish]
Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0377. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: delayed effects; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the kidneys, liver and the cardiovascular, nervous and blood systems. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the lungs, skin, bone marrow, the cardiovascular and nervous systems and other organs; human carcinogen; may cause antifertility effects. Occupational exposure limits: TLV (as As): 0.2mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991).
Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p.

CIS 93-628 Beije B., Lundberg P.
Criteria documents from the Nordic Expert Group 1991
Consensus reports of the Nordic Expert Group for Documentation of Occupational Exposure Limits. The reports cover dimethylethylamine, isophorone, microorganisms, trichloroethene, dimethyl sulfoxide and inorganic arsenic. An appendix lists documents published in English by the Nordic Expert Group.
Arbetsmiljöinstitutet, Förlagstjänst, 171 84 Solna, Sweden, 1991. 236p. Illus. Bibl.ref.

CIS 93-571 Magos L.
Epidemiological and experimental aspects of metal carcinogenesis - Physicochemical properties, kinetics, and the active species
The carcinogenic properties of selected metals and their compounds are reviewed to provide a useful reference for existing knowledge on relationships between physical and chemical forms, kinetics and carcinogenic potential and between epidemiology, bioassays, and short-term tests. Extensive consideration is given to arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel. Other metals such as antimony, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc are discussed briefly.
Environmental Health Perspectives, Nov. 1991, Vol.95, p.157-189. 284 ref.

CIS 93-64 Sodium arsenate
International chemical safety card. Short term exposure effects: delayed effects; irritation of eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the digestive tract, heart, liver, kidney and nervous system. Long term exposure effects: may affect the skin, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, blood and liver; irritation of upper respiratory tract; human carcinogen.
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1991. 2p.

CIS 92-1623 Järup L., Pershagen G.
Arsenic exposure, smoking, and lung cancer in smelter workers - A case-control study
A cohort of 3,916 Swedish copper smelter workers employed for at least 3 months between 1928 and 1967 was followed up through 1981. Arsenic exposure was estimated for different time periods at each workplace within the smelter. Detailed job records were linked to the exposure matrix, thus forming individual cumulative arsenic exposure measures for each smelter worker. Smoking history was collected for 107 lung cancer cases and 214 controls from the cohort. Lung cancer risks were positively related to cumulative arsenic exposure with smoking-standardised relative risks ranging from 0.7-8.7 in different exposure groups. A negative confounding by smoking was suggested in the higher exposure categories. The interaction between arsenic and smoking for the risk of developing lung cancer was intermediate between additive and multiplicative and appeared less pronounced among heavy smokers.
American Journal of Epidemiology, 15 Sep. 1991, Vol.134, No.6, p.545-551. 31 ref.

CIS 92-1103 Arsine
International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; haemolysis resulting in kidney, liver, heart and central nervous system damage; cardiac and renal failure. Long-term exposure effects: suspected human carcinogen.
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 1991. 2p.

CIS 92-1102 Arsenous trichloride
International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; corrosive to the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; pulmonary oedema; neurotoxic effects (peripheral and central neuropathy). Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; probably carcinogenic in humans.
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1991. 2p.

CIS 92-251 Berlin A., Draper M.H., Duffus J.H., van der Venne M.T.
The toxicology of chemicals - 1. Carcinogenicity, Volume III - Summary reviews of the scientific evidence
This volume covers 24 compounds including 10 of the arsenic family (for Vol.I, see CIS 90-258; Vol.II, see CIS 90-1988). An introductory chapter devoted to the inorganic chemistry, biological properties and widespread occurrence of arsenic compounds is provided to serve as an aid in the evaluation of the studies considered. In each review the data are presented under the following headings: introductory remarks; animal data; mutagenic, genotoxic and related information; human data; scientific conclusions; need for further work; references.
Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, 1991. viii, 176p. Bibl.ref. Price: ECU 17.55.

CIS 91-1642 First Workshop on Occupational and Environmental Arsenic Poisoning - Region II
Primera Jornada sobre arsenicismo laboral y ambiental - II Región [in Spanish]
Proceedings of a conference held in Antofagasta (Chile), 23-25 Aug. 1990. Subjects treated by some of the papers: survey of arsenic poisoning in the 2nd (Antofagasta) Region of Chile; chronic exposure to arsenic; determination of urinary arsenic in various parts of Chile; analytical chemistry in the toxicology of arsenic; permitted biological limits for arsenic-exposed workers (0.2mg/L of urine); programme for the protection of workers exposed to arsenic trioxide. In annex: list of participants; programme of the workshop.
Asociación Chilena de Seguridad, Casilla 14565, Correo Central, Santiago, Chile, June 1991. 133p. Illus. Bibl.ref.

1990

CIS 92-197 Marchiori L., Rozio L., Bressan A., Biasoli S., Cesaro A., Peretti A., Tommasi I., Perbellini L.
Occupational arsine poisoning: A case report
Intossicazione professionale da arsina: descrizione di un caso [in Italian]
A case of occupational arsine poisoning is described that occurred in a small family workshop during blackening operations on zinc/aluminium alloy manufactured parts with acid solutions. This report shows that cases of occupational poisoning believed to have disappeared can still occur, especially in small plants.
Medicina del lavoro, Jan.-Feb. 1990, Vol.81, No.1, p.330-334. 10 ref.

CIS 91-961
Health and Safety Executive
Arsenic: health and safety precautions
The guidance note, a revision of the 1976 edition (CIS 77-1068), deals with arsenic and its compounds excluding arsine. Contents: properties of arsenic; industrial uses; assessment of health risks; control of exposure; occupational exposure limits, personal protective equipment and emergency procedures; monitoring exposure; health surveillance; information and training of personnel; legal requirements. An appendix covers health effects of arsenic and its compounds.
HMSO Books, P.O. Box 276, London Sw8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1990. 7p. 22 ref.

CIS 91-900 Fukabori S., Nakaaki K.
Determination of tellurium, selenium, antimony and arsenic in scalp hair and exposure evaluation
Mōhatsu chū teruru, seren, anchimon, hiso no sokutei to bakuro hyōka [in Japanese]
The given method consists of washing, digestion, sample treatment before analysis and determination of these elements by hydrogen-flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The geometric mean of the amount found in the air of 93 occupationally non-exposed subjects was zero for tellurium, 349ng/g for selenium, 8.2ng/g for antimony and 18.3ng/g for arsenic. The 95 percentile level of these subjects was zero for tellurium, 450ng/g for selenium, 25ng/g for antimony and 40ng/g for arsenic. For 61 occupationally exposed subjects, the means varied between measurements in 2 successive years; 12.5ng/g (for 26 cases) in 1988 and zero in 1989 for tellurium, 621ng/g in 1988 and 1115.8ng/g in 1989 for selenium, 41.3ng/g in 1988 and 19.7ng/g in 1989 for antimony and 27.7ng/g in 1988 and 29.5ng/g in 1989 for arsenic. These exceeded the corresponding 95 percentile values of the control group except for arsenic. Thus, the 95 percentile value in the hair of occupationally non-exposed subjects can serve as a valid baseline for evaluating exposure to those metals.
Journal of Science of Labour - Rōdō Kagaku, 10 May 1990, Vol.66, No.5, p.218-231. 32 ref.

CIS 90-1628 Ruuskanen J., Que Hee S.S., Ayer H., Boyle J.R., Webster S., Jbara J., Mantei T.D., Willeke K.
Contamination in an experimental gallium arsenide etch system
This study looks at the by-products which accumulated within a prototype plasma etching reactor system following two years of sporadic dry etching of gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafers. The deposits on the reactor chamber walls, in the vacuum pump oil and its filter, in the oil mist eliminator, and in the exhaust charcoal canister were analysed for 33 elements. Gallium residues were detected only on the wall of the reactor chamber, while most of the arsenic residues were found in the rotary pump oil. Potential emission of volatile chlorine-containing compounds from the chlorine-based etching system was also indicated. Protective measures are needed for oil and oil filter charging, contact with interior surfaces of the reactor chamber, and vacuum pump maintenance.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1990, Vol.51, No.1, p.8-13. Illus. 24 ref.

CIS 90-1106 Arsenic
International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of eyes, skin and respiratory tract; hepatic and renal damage. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; skin damage; carcinogen; teratogen; neurotoxic effects. EC identification number and labelling codes: 033-001-00-X; Toxic; R23/24; S1/2-20/21-28-44. United Nations number and hazard class: UN 1558 (6.1; II).
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1990. 2p. Illus.

CIS 90-401 Arsenic (inorganic) and compounds
Arsénico inorgánico y sus compuestos [in Spanish]
Chemical safety information sheet published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Exposure limit (OSHA): 0.01mg/m3; A2 carcinogen (ACGIH). Toxicity: skin absorption; neurotoxic effects; skin and lung cancer; cancer of the lymphatic system.
Noticias de seguridad, Jan. 1990, Vol.52, No.1, 5p. Insert.

1989

CIS 91-1520 Javelaud B., Lagoutte A., Malikouti H., Boudène C.
Measurement method of urinary arsenic without prior mineralisation of the sample - 2. Urinary arsenic levels in smelter workers exposed to arsenic dust
Intérêt d'une méthode de dosage de l'arsenic urinaire sans minéralisation préalable de l'échantillon - 2. L'arsenic urinaire des ouvriers fondeurs exposés aux poussières arsenicales [in French]
Gold ore smelting workers are exposed to arsenic dust. Biological monitoring of the urine of the workers at an arsenic trioxide recovery plant was carried out between 1983 to 1987. Urinary arsenic levels were measured using a method not relying on prior mineralisation of the sample. 250 samples were analysed. The influence of smoking on the urinary levels of arsenic became evident when a comparison was made between the arsenic contamination of tobacco smoked by the workers and that of tobacco generally marketed. The determination method is not expensive and it is recommended for the biological monitoring of workers and as an epidemiological tool.
Archives des maladies professionnelles, 1989, Vol.50, No.1, p.87-92. Illus. 14 ref.

CIS 91-1519 Malikouti H., Javelaud B., Lallement B., Boudène C.
Measurement method of urinary arsenic without prior mineralisation of a sample - 1. Urinary arsenic in the general population and in mispickel miners
Intérêt d'une méthode de dosage de l'arsenic urinaire sans minéralisation préalable de l'échantillon - 1. L'arsenic urinaire dans la population générale et chez les mineurs de mispickel [in French]
The presence of arsenic in seafood interferes with the traditional determination method for arsenic, which relies on mineralisation. The method that is described can be used for the determination of urinary arsenic without prior mineralisation, making it possible to determine urinary arsenic levels in gold-miners exposed to mispickel and gold ore associated with arsenic pyrite on one hand and in the general population on the other. A comparative analysis of 218 urinary samples shows that there is a statistical difference between the 2 populations as far as arsenic concentrations in urine are concerned, but it cannot be concluded from this that gold-miners are exposed to harmful levels of arsenic.
Archives des maladies professionnelles, 1989, Vol.50, No.1, p.79-86. Illus. 29 ref.

CIS 91-1092
National Board of Labour Protection (Finland)
Arsenic trioxide, Arsenic-III-oxide
Translation into English of the chemical safety information sheet described in CIS 87-785. Arsenic trioxide is a very toxic, carcinogenic liquid that accumulates in the body. Inhalation can cause irritation, neurological disorders and lung cancer. Skin contact causes irritation, wounds, eczema and skin cancer. Ingestion causes vomiting, severe diarrhoea and injuries to the peripheral nerve system, heart and liver. Mandatory European labelling: T, R23, R25, R103, S1, S2, S20, S21, S28, S44.
International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre (CIS), International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 1989. 2p.

CIS 91-1091
National Board of Labour Protection (Finland)
Arsenic-V-oxide
Translation into English of the chemical safety information sheet described in CIS 87-783. Also known as: arsenic pentoxide. It is a toxic, carcinogenic substance that is absorbed through the skin and accumulates in the body. Inhalation can cause coughing, fever, neurological disorders and lung cancer. Skin contact causes irritation, eczema and skin cancer. Ingestion causes vomiting, intestinal spasms and severe diarrhoea. Mandatory European labelling: T, R21, R23, R25, R103, S1, S2, S20, S21, S28, S44, S103.
International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre (CIS), International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 1989. 2p.

CIS 90-1975 Toxicological profile for arsenic
Acute oral exposure to inorganic arsenic causes irritation of the gastrointestinal tract, while long-term exposure may lead to more serious disorders including anemia, peripheral neuropathy, cardiotoxicity, and increased risk of skin cancer. Dermal contact with inorganic arsenic may produce skin irritation, while inhalation exposure increases the risk of lung cancer. In general, organic derivatives of arsenic are less toxic than inorganic forms. International and US guidelines and regulations are quoted. Glossary of terms used.
Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA, Mar. 1989. 125p. Illus. Bibl.

CIS 90-1321
National Occupational Health and Safety Commission (Worksafe Australia)
Arsenic and its compounds
This safety guide to work with arsenic (As) and its compounds contains information on: identification; health hazards (exposure routes, acute poisoning - potentially lethal, irritant effects, systemic toxicity, cancer); prevention and control measures: monitoring, recommended exposure standards in Australia (0.05mg/m3 as As), control measures, engineering controls, incompatibilities, personal protective equipment, environmental and personal hygiene, education and training, precautions in case of fire, storage, spills and leaks, disposal. Special section on the highly toxic and flammable gas arsine: toxicity (highly lethal); recommended exposure standards (0.2mg/m3 = 0.05ppm); ventilation; incompatibilities; precautions in case of fire, spills and leaks; first aid. In appendices: arsine production in industry; metabolism and excretion of arsenic and biological monitoring.
Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia, Dec. 1989. 26p. + Corrigendum. 15 ref. Price: AUD 9.95.

CIS 89-1780 Diarsenic trioxide
Trioxyde de diarsenic [in French]
Chemical safety information sheet. Exposure limits (France, 1988) = 0.2mg As/m3. Toxicity: skin absorption; neurotoxic effects; irritation of eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns and dermatitis; conjunctivitis; photophobia; lung and skin cancer. EC identification numbers and mandatory labelling codes: No.033-003-00-0; T+, R45, R28, R34, S53, S45.
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30, rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 15, France, 1989. 6p. 21 ref.

1988

CIS 91-192 Kacnel'son B.A., Tartakovskaja L. Ja., Neizvestnova E.M., Davydova V.I., Gridin N.M., Remizov Ju.A., Blohin V.A., Lipatov G.Ja., Šaripova N.P., Babakova O.M.
Bases for a uniform hygienic standard for inorganic arsenic compounds in workplace air
K obosnovaniju edinogo gigieničeskogo normativa dlja neorganičeskih soedinenij myš'jaka v vozduhe rabočej zony [in Russian]
The toxicity of 18 inorganic arsenic compounds (IAC) and the carcinogenicity of 4 of them were evaluated. The IACs' toxicity depended mainly on their solubility and arsenic (As) content, rather than on As valence. As was the main active toxic and blastomogenic component of the IACs. The findings provide a basis for establishing a uniform hygienic standard for all the IACs with respect to As. Epidemiologic studies were carried out at 4 gold mines (differing in airborne arsenopyrite levels) and in copper smelting shops at 2 plants with different arsenic trioxide levels in workplace air. The findings were the basis for suggesting an average MAC (per workshift) of 0.01mg/m3 for As in workplace . The MAC for one-time exposure was set at 0.04mg/m3 for As in air. The necessity of skin and eye protection is stressed.
Gigiena truda i professional'nye zabolevanija, Sep. 1988, No.9, p.8-12. 14 ref.

CIS 90-1446 Inorganic arsenic and its compounds (as As), potential human carcinogen
Chemical safety information sheet taken from the newly revised edition of the NIOSH publication "Occupational Safety and Health Guidelines for Chemical Hazards". Exposure limits: OSHA PEL (8h-TWA, carcinogen) = 0.01mg/m3; NIOSH REL (ceiling 15min) = 0.002mg/m3; ACGIH TLV (8h-TWA; A2 carcinogen) = 0.2mg/m3. Toxicity: disorders of the gastrointestinal tract; skin and eye irritation; skin sensitisation; ulceration and perforation of the nasal septum; neuritis; neuropathy; anaemia; cancers of the skin, lungs and lymphatic system.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Standards Development and Technology Transfer, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1988, USA, 1988. 6p. Bibl.

CIS 90-548 Pedersen B.
Determination of hydrides of arsenic, antimony and tin in workplace air
The efficiency of a silver nitrate-impregnated 37mm back-up pad (Ag-pad) in collecting hydrides of arsenic, antimony and tin has been studied. Detailed analytical methods using graphite furnace-AAS for the quantitative determination of the elements have been developed and the accuracy and precision of the methods have been determined. A field study in a lead acid battery manufacturing plant has been performed using a 37mm 0.8µm cellulose acetate filter combined with an Ag-pad to collect and differentiate between hydrides and particulate compounds of arsenic and antimony in the air.
Annals of Occupational Hygiene, 1988, Vol.32, No.3, p.385-397. Illus. 16 ref.

CIS 90-403 Arsine, potential human carcinogen
Chemical safety information sheet taken from the newly revised edition of the NIOSH publication "Occupational Safety and Health Guidelines for Chemical Hazards". Exposure limits: OSHA PEL (8h-TWA) = 0.2mg/m3; NIOSH REL (15min ceiling) = 0.002mg As/m3; ACGIH TLV (8h-TWA) = 0.2mg/m3. Odour threshold = 0.5ppm. Toxicity: haemolysis; hepatic and renal damage; neurotoxic effects; pulmonary oedema; haematuria; suspected human carcinogen.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Standards Development and Technology Transfer, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati OH 45226, USA, 1988. 5p. Bibl.

CIS 90-402 Arsenic trioxide
Arszenik trójtlenek arsenu [in Polish]
Chemical safety information sheet. Permissible exposure limit (Poland) = 0.3mg As/m3.
Centralny Instytut Ochrony Pracy, 1 Ul. Tamka, 00-349, Warszawa 30, Poland, 1988. 2p.

CIS 89-919
Council on Scientific Affairs of the American Medical Association
Cancer risk of pesticides in agricultural workers
This report discusses some of the inherent limitations of cancer studies in animals and humans and presents a qualitative carcinogen risk assessment of a number of pesticides based on the judgement of national and international authorities who have reviewed the available experimental and epidemiologic evidence. A large number of pesticidal compounds have shown evidence of genotoxicity or carcinogenicity in animal and in vitro screening tests, but no pesticides - except arsenic and vinyl chloride (once used as an aerosol propellant) - have definitely been proved to be carcinogenic in man. A resolution by the Council on Scientific Affairs calls for the American Medical Association, through its scientific journals and publications, to alert physicians to the potential hazards of agricultural pesticides.
Journal of the American Medical Association, 19 Aug. 1988, Vol.260, No.7, p.959-966. 42 ref.

CIS 89-560 Sobel W., Bond G.G., Baldwin C.L., Ducommun D.J.
An update of respiratory cancer and occupational exposure to arsenicals
Mortality data were updated through 1982 for 611 arsenic-exposed employees originally studied through 1973. In the earlier report, total mortality was below the figure for the comparable US population; however, mortality was significantly elevated for respiratory cancer. The focus of the update was on respiratory cancer and it was of special interest to study whether the risk of respiratory cancer remained in excess for individuals alive as of the end of the previous study. In the update, 9 additional respiratory cancers were observed after 1973, the end of the follow-up in the original study, versus 7.8 expected. The risk ratio for the time-interval 1974-1982 (standardised mortality ratio SMR = 116) was diminished when compared with that reported in the original study (SMR = 330). When the entire study period was analysed, the risk of respiratory cancer did not appear to decline with interval since exposure cessation.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1988, Vol. 13, No.2, p.263-270. 18 ref.

1987

CIS 92-959
Commission of the European Communities
Biological indicators for the assessment of human exposure to industrial chemicals: Aldrin and dieldrin, arsenic, cobalt, endrin, vanadium
The available data on the human health effects, metabolism and biological indicators of these substances are reviewed. Conclusions reached: determination of the concentration of dieldrin in blood is the most relevant test for assessing aldrin-dieldrin exposure and dieldrin body burden; determination in urine may be used for monitoring exposure to arsenic and vanadium; occupational exposure to cobalt can be measured by measuring its concentration in ambient air and, for soluble cobalt compounds, also by measuring the concentration of the metal in urine and blood; the concentration of endrin in blood is an indicator of short-term over-exposure to endrin, while urinary concentration of the major endrin metabolite is used for the measurement of normal low occupational exposure.
Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, 1987. 93p. Illus. Bibl.ref.

CIS 89-1423
Ontario Ministry of Labour - Occupational Health and Safety Division
Regulation respecting arsenic - made under the Occupational Health and Safety Act [Canada - Ontario]
This Regulation, as amended by Ontario Regulation 23/87, prescribes arsenic (As) (including its organic compounds except arsine but not its organic compounds when no inorganic compounds are present) as a designated substance. Exposure limits set for workplace air: TWA exposure - 10µg As/m3, short-term (15min) exposure - 50µg As/m3. Other aspects covered: responsibilities of employers; control programmes; monitoring; record keeping; medical supervision. Also included: schedule for calculating TWA exposures; code for respiratory equipment for arsenic; code for measuring airborne arsenic.
Ontario Government Bookstore, Publication Services Section, 5th Floor, 880 Bay Street, Toronto M7A 1N8, Ont., Canada, 1987. 44p.

CIS 89-402 Arsine
Arsenikhydrid, arsenikväte [in Swedish]
Chemical safety information sheet taken from the Kemiska Ämnen Register (see CIS 89-214). Exposure limit: TLV = 0.05mg/m3. Toxicity: skin absorption; carcinogen; irritates the eyes; blood diseases; kidney damage; pulmonary oedema.
Arbetarskyddsnämnden, Box 3208, 103 64 Stockholm, Sweden, 1987. 2p.

CIS 89-400 Arsenic trioxide
Arsenikoxid, arseniktrioxid [in Swedish]
Chemical safety information sheet taken from the Kemiska Ämnen Register (see CIS 89-214). Exposure limit: TLV = 0.05mg/m3. Toxicity: carcinogen; irritates the eyes; liver and kidney damage; neurological disorders; haematological disorders; dermatitis.
Arbetarskyddsnämnden, Box 3208, 103 64 Stockholm, Sweden, 1987. 2p.

CIS 89-508 NIOSH Alert - Request for assistance in reducing the potential risk of developing cancer from exposure to gallium arsenide particulates in the microelectronics industry
This Alert describes reports of animal studies indicating potential carcinogenicity. Safe working methods, personal protective clothing and equipment, and decontamination and waste disposal are recommended.
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA, 1987. 8p. 11 ref.

CIS 88-1990 Harper M.
Possible toxic metal exposure of prehistoric bronze workers
An attempt was made to assess the possible occupational exposure to arsenic, lead, and mercury during the Bronze Age. Archaeological, metallurgical, and historical evidence is combined to form a picture of the potential toxic hazards. In the case of arsenic, a definite picture emerges of the effect of toxicity as a useful material is abandoned for health reasons on discovery of an acceptable alternative.
British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1987, Vol.44, No.10, p.652-656. Illus. 10 ref.

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