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Hand and arm protection - 254 entries found

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  • Hand and arm protection

1981

CIS 83-540 Adolfson J., Elnäs S., Sperling L.
Development of suitable diver's gloves
Utveckling av funktionsdugliga dykarhandskar [in Swedish]
Tests were carried out by 10 divers at depth of 5m in water at +0.1°C with a view to evaluating a 5-finger rubber glove worn over a synthetic-fibre inner glove. Sections cover: test environment (diving suit, glove system); test persons; test equipment and testing procedure (testing of hand motoricity, tactile discrimination, static grip strength and endurance; recording of temperatures and cardiac rhythm); presentation of results (hand, foot and body-core temperatures; thermal protection afforded by glove system; test results); discussion, conclusions and recommendation calling for tests at higher pressure (i.e. greater depths).
Försvarets Forskningsanstalt, Huvudavdelning 5, 10254 Stockholm, Sweden, Nov. 1981. 34p. Illus. 20 ref.

CIS 82-814 Liwkowicz J., Dobrowolska A., Jędrzejewska M.
Assessing new models of safety gloves for work with organic solvents, and determining their field of use
Ocena nowych rękawic ochronnych odpornych na działanie rozpuszczalników organicznych i ustalenie zakresu ich stosowania [in Polish]
Description and results of tests on the protection offered by 6 models of glove (made from polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile and a mixture of oilproof polyvinyl chloride) against a series of industrial solvents including, amongst the most common and agressive: trichloroethylene, toluene, cyclohexane, acetone, ethyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, p-xylene, n-hexane. The tests checked solvent permeability, tensile strength, stretch resistance, flexibility and surface distension. The model of glove that was given approval by the Polish Central Workers' Protection Institute (CIOP) was made from polyvinyl alcohol by a 3-dip process. The technical requirements to be met by this type of glove are reviewed.
Prace Centralnego instytutu ochrony pracy, 1981, Vol.31, No.111, p.327-338. 23 ref.

CIS 82-654 Samimi B.S., Williams A.M.
Occupational exposure to asbestos fibres resulting from use of asbestos gloves
176 air samples were collected over 10 pairs of asbestos gloves in an isolation chamber during simulation of a sterilisation procedure. Means of time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations ranged from 0.95 to 11.74 fibres (>5µm/cm3 of air). Well-worn, clean gloves emitted more fibres than did new gloves, but fibre emission decreased with increased surface soiling. In a simulation of the sterilisation procedure in a well-ventilated room, the range of mean TWA concentrations was 0.07-0.99 fibre/cm3 for breathing zone samples and 0.06-0.60 fibre/cm3 for area samples. In actual workplaces the concentration range was 0.07-2.93 and 0.04-0.74 fibre/cm3 in breathing zones and areas respectively. 5 of 7 breathing zone samples in workplaces exceeded the proposed TWA concentration limit of 0.1 asbestos fibre/cm3. The use of available substitutes for asbestos gloves is strongly recommended.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1981, Vol.42, No.12, p.870-875. Illus. 12 ref.

CIS 82-808 Schwope A.D., Randel M.A., Broome M.G.
Dimethyl sulfoxide permeation through glove materials
The breakthrough time for dimethyl sulfoxide was measured through samples of 4 types of rubber used in commercially available protective gloves. Breakthrough times varied from 1.5-2h for natural rubber to >8h for neoprene latex.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Oct. 1981, Vol.42, No.10, p.722-725. Illus. 7 ref.

CIS 82-807 Nelson G.O., Lum B.Y., Carlson G.J., Wong C.M., Johnson J.S.
Glove permeation by organic solvents
The breakthrough times and permeation rates of 29 laboratory solvents through 28 protective gloves were measured using gas-phase, infrared spectrophotometric techniques to determine the permeation characteristics. The gloves were made of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride and natural, neoprene, and nitrile rubbers. 5 different types of permeation behaviour were observed. No one glove offered complete protection against all the solvents tested. The permeation rate of the solvent was inversely proportional to glove thickness for a given material. A 50:50 pentane/trichloroethylene mixture exhibited a large, positive synergistic rate.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Mar. 1981, Vol.42, No.3, p.217-225. Illus. 11 ref.

CIS 82-213 Dobrowolska A., Jędrzejewska M.
Choice of materials for safety gloves offering protection against perforation, cuts and abrasion
Dobór materiałów do wykonania rękawic chroniących przed przekłuciem, przecięciem i ścieraniem [in Polish]
Results of tests carried out by the Polish Central Workers' Protection Institute (CIOP) to determine the flexibility and resistance to perforation, cuts and abrasion of various materials (leathers and woven fabrics, woven and knitted fabrics coated with polyvinyl chloride, knitted fabrics coated with rubber or polyacrylonitrile) and gloves manufactured in Poland and other countries. The results are presented in 4 tables to permit selection of a suitable product in relation to the type of hazard encountered.
Prace Centralnego instytutu ochrony pracy, 1981, Vol.31, No.108, p.43-51. 8 ref.

CIS 81-2063
National Health Insurance Fund (Comités techniques nationaux des commerces non alimentaires, des activités du groupe interprofessionnel et des industries et commerces de l'alimentation, Caisse nationale de l'assurance-maladie)
Protection of the hands in using tools and equipment for preparing foodstuffs
Protection de la main dans l'emploi de certains outils et appareils destinés à la préparation de produits alimentaires [in French]
Recommendation adopted by these 3 joint technical committees (on 19 Nov. 1980, 30 Jan. 1981 and 4 Feb. 1981 respectively). Equipment covered: hand knives, including circular knives; portable machines, including saws, if the hand can touch the blade when they are in use. Preventive measures concern cutting and pricking hazards, but not electric hazards. Recommendations: workers should be provided with metal gloves (technical data appended), knives should be fitted with guards, facilities should be provided for cleaning and disinfecting knives, and staff should be trained in safe working methods. Commentaries.
Cahiers de notes documentaires - Sécurité et hygiène du travail, 3rd quarter 1981, No.104, Note No.1337-104-81 (Recommendation No.185), p.423-424.

1980

CIS 81-1906 Elnäs S., Holmér I.
Thermal assessment of gloves using an electrically heated model hand
Termisk utvärdering av handbeklädnad med en elektriskt uppvärmd handmodell [in Swedish]
A model hand in which heat, supplied electrically, was controlled by a computer, was used to test the thermal insulation provided by 9 commercially available winter mittens. The model hand consisted of 16 sections each with an individual heat supply. The heat transfer coefficient was determined for the bare hand in the 0-4m/s wind speed range. The coefficient was 16.5Wm-2K-1 in still air and increased by 15.1 for each 1m/s wind speed. The heat transfer coefficient for the hand covered with a good winter mitten was 6.2Wm-2K-1 and the increase was 0.55 for each 1m/s wind speed.
Arbetarskyddsstyrelsen, 171 84 Solna, Sweden, 1981. 15p. Illus. 5 ref.

CIS 81-1090 Hervé-Bazin B., Foussereau J., Cavelier C.
Allergy due to N-isopropyl-N'-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine (IPPD) in personal protective equipment
L'allergie à la N-isopropyl-N'-phényl-p-phénylènediamine (IPPD) dans certains objets de protection individuelle. [in French]
Results of analytical research and clinical allergic sensitisation investigations to determine IPPD-type aromatic amines in personal protective equipment made of elastomers: gloves, boots and dust respirators. Some IPPD-sensitised subjects do not react on contact with equipment containing this substance; some, on the contrary, react on contact with equipment where IPPD has not been detected on analysis. These results show up problems and gaps in analytical research and allergic sensitisation investigations when attempting to determine IPPD sensitisation due to contact with a new rubber product of unknown composition.
Dermatosen in Beruf und Umwelt, 1980, Vol.28, No.3, p.82-88. Illus. 5 ref. (8p. supplement: German translation).

CIS 81-1116 Wall L.M.
Nickel penetration through rubber gloves.
Positive path tests confirm nickel penetration through rubber gloves. Tests with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) on the skin at the path test site indicate that nickel reactivity may occur in the presence of nickel concentrations that are too low to produce a positive DMG reaction.
Contact Dermatitis, Dec. 1980, Vol.6, No.7, p.461-463. 6 ref.

CIS 80-2004 Sperling L., Jonsson B., Holmér I., Lewin T.
Test programme for work gloves
Testprogram för arbetshandskar [in Swedish]
Programme devised to evaluate the functions of the gloved hand in various occupations: determination of motility of hand and fingers, tactile discrimination, grip and torsion strength and strength of thumb; electromyographic measurement of load on muscles of the forearm and hand; tests with gloved hand in cold climate box.
Undersökningsrapport 1980:18, Arbetarskyddsstyrelsen, Arbetsfysiologiska enheten, Box 6104, 900 06 Umeå, Sweden, 29 May 1980. 56p. Illus. 4 ref.

CIS 80-1714 The hand
La main [in French]
Series of 4 leaflets on hand protection: reproductions of posters; advice for protection against hazards of tools, machinery and chemicals; advice on choice of hand protection.
INRS Nos.608, 609, 610, 611. Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Feb. 1980. 4 leaflets (order code No.11361, 11362, 11363, 11364). Illus.

CIS 80-1701 Hogstedt C., Ståhl R.
Skin absorption and protective gloves in dynamic work.
Experiments are reported in which ethylene glycol dinitrate (EGDN) was measured in the blood of subjects whose hands were exposed to dynamite vapours or to a combination of the vapours and the solid phase, with and without cotton and/or rubber gloves. Rubber gloves absorbed considerable amounts of EGDN and let it pass through to the skin. Rubber gloves with cotton liners offer some protection if changed hourly.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, May 1980, Vol.41, No.5, p.367-372. Illus. 14 ref.

CIS 80-1362 Lauwerys R.R., Kivits A., Lhoir M., Rigolet P., Houbeau D., Buchet J.P., Roels H.A.
Biological surveillance of workers exposed to dimethylformamide and the influence of skin protection on its percutaneous absorption.
Blood and urine were analysed in 22 workers in an acrylic fibre factory exposed to dimethylformamide (DMF) and 28 controls. When direct skin contact with DMF was prevented there was a significant relation between atmospheric DMF concentrations and post-shift urinary N-methylformamide (NMF) levels. Exposure to 10mg/m3 for 6h (urinary NMF <40-50mg/g creatinine) is probably safe as regards liver damage. Different protective measures were studied in 7 workers. Skin absorption was greater than inhalation exposure when no protection was used. Wearing of impermeable gloves with long sleeves appears to be the best method of preventing DMF absorption. Silicone or glycerol barrier creams are not recommended.
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Mar. 1980, Vol.45, No.3, p.189-203. Illus. 14 ref.

CIS 80-1355 The hand, a tool for life
La main, un outil pour la vie. [in French]
This issue is devoted to the risk of occupational accidents and diseases of the hand. Contents: statistics of accidents involving the hands (France); mechanical, thermal, and chemical hazards, manual handling tasks; occupational diseases (dermatitis, vibration, vinyl chlolride, tetanus); personal hygiene; role of the hand and its protection in the industrial environment (French regulations; textile industry; metalworking industry; woodworking; plastics, rubber, leather and fur industries; construction); hand tools; protective gloves; barrier creams; surgical treatment and protheses; left-handed workers. This issue is part of a hand safety campaign which also includes posters, slide-tapes, and a film ("Hand of Crystal") aimed at information of the general public.
Travail et sécurité, Feb.-Mar. 1980, special issue, p.89-184. Illus. 31 ref.

1979

CIS 81-2024
German Standards Institute (Deutsche Institut für Normung)
Protective gloves against mechanical stresses
Schutzhandschuhe gegen mechanische Beanspruchung [in German]
This standard, which prescribes safety specifications under the Act of 24 June 1968 respecting technical equipment used in industry, applies to gloves for protection against mechanical agencies and gives requirements regarding: wear and tear, resistance to penetration, friction (abrasion) coefficient, testing and marking.
Teil 2, Beuth Verlag GmbH, Burggrafenstrasse 4-7, D-1000 Berlin 30, May 1979. 3p. Illus. Price: DM.14.90.

CIS 80-1256 Sors C., Heintz C., Cabasson B.
Health hazards of asbestos protective clothing
Pathologie de l'amiante et vêtements de protection. [in French]
Two cases of pneumopathy (malignant pleural mesothelioma and pulmonary asbestosis with calcified pleural plaques) associated with the wearing of asbestos gloves are reported. In both cases the presence of ferruginous bodies with a visible central fibre was established. The hazards of other types of asbestos clothing are discussed. The chief prevention measures recommended are: prevention of release of pathogenic fibres by means of better production methods for fabrics and clothing; discarding of protective clothing as soon as it shows signs of wear. The importance of medical prevention and early detection of pneumopathies associated with asbestos is stressed.
Archives des maladies professionnelles, Nov. 1979, Vol.40, No.11, p.987-995. 24 ref.

CIS 80-806
USSR State Standards Committee (Gosudarstvennyj komitet SSSR po standartam).
Equipment to protect hands and arms from radioactive substances - General rules and instructions for use
Sredstva zaščity ruk ot radioaktivnyh veščestv - Obščie trebovanija i pravila primenenija [in Russian]
This standard (effective 1 July 1980) concerns gloves and protective sleeves to be worn when manipulating radioactive substances; it does not apply to radiation protection gloves covered by USSR Standard GOST 21785-76. Uses and constituent materials of these gloves and arm guards.
GOST 12.4.066-79, Izdatel'stvo standartov, Novopresnenskij per.3, 123557 Moskva, USSR, 4 July 1979. 4p. Price: Rbl.0.03.

CIS 80-494
USSR State Standards Committee (Gosudarstvennyj komitet SSSR po standartam).
Fabrics for protective clothing and gloves - Descriptive list with quality indices
Tkani dlja specodeždy i sredstv zaščity ruk - Nomenklatura pokazatelej kačestva [in Russian]
This standard (effective 1 Jan. 1981) contains tables with data concerning the resistance and other properties of these fabrics from the industrial hygiene viewpoint, a classification of fabrics according to industrial uses, and data to facilitate choice of fabrics for specific industrial processes.
GOST 12.4.073-79, Izdatel'stvo standartov, Novopresnenskij per.3, 123557 Moskva, USSR, 10 Aug. 1979. 9p. Price: Rbl.0.03.

CIS 80-493
USSR State Standards Committee (Gosudarstvennyj komitet SSR po standardam).
Materials for protective gloves - Descriptive list with quality indices
Materialy dlja sredstv zaščity ruk - Nomenklatura pokazatelej kačestva [in Russian]
This standard (effective 1 July 1980) consists mainly of tables giving data on resistance, impermeability and other requirements to be met by artificial leather, plastic films, rubberised fabrics and asbestos fabrics used in glove manufacture. The standard lists and classifies these materials according to their industrial uses; synoptic tables facilitate their selection, depending on the tasks to be performed.
GOST 12.4.069-79, Izdatel'stvo standartov, Novopresnenskij per.3, 123557 Moskva, USSR, 8 Aug. 1979, 11p. Price: Rbl.0.05.

CIS 80-193 Williams J.R.
Permeation of glove materials by physiologically harmful chemicals.
Breakthrough time and permeation rate of 1,4-dichloro-2-butene, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, and 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene were determined for 11 gloves. Four methods were evaluated. Wide variations in glove thickness and protection time makes it necessary to test the proposed glove with the chemicals to be handled.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Oct. 1979, Vol.40, No.10, p.877-882. Illus. 9 ref.

CIS 80-191 Pegum J.S.
Penetration of protective gloves by epoxy resin.
A case is reported of dermatitis of the hands, forearms and face occurring in a man using a mixture of epoxy resin and hardener, wearing light disposable polythene gloves. Patch tests performed with the resin in cut-off fingers of rubber and plastic gloves gave positive results. A need exists for impermeable gloves.
Contact Dermatitis, Sep. 1979, Vol.5, No.5, p.281-283. 5 ref.

CIS 80-189
State Standards Committee (Gosudarstvennyj komitet po standartam).
Protective clothing for the hands and arms - Method for determining permeability to acids and alkalis
Sredstva zaščity ruk - Metod opredelenija kisloto- i ščeločepronicaemosti [in Russian]
This standard (effective 1 July 1980) applies to plastic protective gloves, with or without textile fabric backing. It specifies testing equipment and the aggressive liquids to be used (millivoltmeter for determining pH, concentration of acids and alkalis) and describes test procedures.
GOST 12.4.063-79, Izdatel'stvo standartov, Novopresnenskij per.3, Moskva D-557, USSR, 23 Mar. 1979, 4p. Illus. Price: Rbl.0.03.

CIS 79-1717 Dionne E.D.
How to select proper hand protection - Eight simple tests rate glove performance.
Since arm and hand injuries are among the most numerous, and there is no single protection, hand protection must be selected on the basis of the job done. Choice includes gloves, mittens, pads, thumb guards, finger cots, wrist and forearm protectors, elbow guards, sleeves, capes. Details in the selection process discussed are: performance properties (resistance to abrasion, cutting, heat, chemicals; impermeability, comfort, flexibility, ageing, cost); terminology in the industry; selection guidelines (cuts, abrasions, blisters; light and heavy materials handling, pinch points, chemicals, electricity, flame and heat, radiation, sanitation); dermatitis, primary irritation, sensitisation dermatitis; toxic vegetation; drugs, cleansers and barrier creams; maintenance; injury and dermatoses control.The 8 tests are abrasion, cuts, puncture and tear resistance; gripping; dexterity and flexibility; hand comfort; chemicals handling.
National Safety News, May 1979, Vol.119, No.5, p.44-53 and 56. Illus. 12 ref.

1978

CIS 90-1765
Ministerio de Trabajo y Seguridad Social
Protective gloves against chemical agents [Spain]
Guantes de protección frente a agresivos químicos [in Spanish]
Technical standard on protective gloves, brought into legal force by a Resolution of the Dirección General de Trabajo on 6 May 1977. Contents: definitions; classification; characteristics of protective gloves; requirements for gloves with and without support; testing. In the appendix: ministerial Order dated 17 May 1974 on the type testing of personal protective equipment.
Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1978. 33p. Illus. 8 ref.

CIS 79-1118 Partida Perdigones E., Cortés Díaz J.M., Morón Rodríguez J., Martínez Monasterio J.
Protective gloves - Frequent hazards - Tests
Guantes de protección - Riesgos más frecuentes - Ensayos [in Spanish]
Contents: introduction and general remarks; tests for traction, tearing, penetration resistance, shrinkage, abrasion, impermeability, resistance to detergents, organic solvents and chemical agents (leather, textile fabric, plastic and rubber gloves). Performances of various makes of glove as regards protection against mechanical hazards and chemical agents are presented in tabular form.
Medicina y seguridad del trabajo, Apr.-June 1978, Vol.26, No.102, p.70-87. Illus. 12 ref.

CIS 79-508 Günter L.
Safety requirements for protective gloves
Sicherheitstechnische Anforderungen an Schutzhandschuhe [in German]
This article reviews the standards in force in the Fed.Rep. of Germany on this subject and gives technical data of specifications imposed on gloves by these standards: form and dimensions, pH of leather used (>3.5), soluble substances content of plastics, bending strength and elasticity, dielectric strength (below 108Ohm). Standards concerning resistance to wear by abrasion, penetration and heat are in preparation. This article mentions cases where wearing protective gloves increases the risk of accident (e.g. wearing gloves made of absorbent materials when handling flammable liquids, gloves caught in moving parts of machinery). The qualities of various materials in standing up to mechanical, thermal and chemical stresses are shown in 2 tables. Marking of gloves in DIN codes.
Die Berufsgenossenschaft, June 1978, No.6, p.367-372. Illus. 4 ref.

CIS 78-2001
Dirección general de trabajo (General Directorate of Labour), Madrid.
Protective gloves against aggressive chemicals
Guantes de protección frente a agresivos químicos [in Spanish]
Statutory technical standard approved on 6 May 1977. Contents: scope and general remarks (classification of gloves); characteristics (materials, shape, dimensions, thickness); requirements (weight loss on application of heat, impermeability to air, penetration resistance, tensile strength, resistance to corrosive chemicals); testing (visual inspection, weight loss on application of heat, impermeability to air, mechanical strength and resistance to chemicals). Appendix: text of the Ministerial Order of 17 May 1974 concerning approval of personal protective equipment.
Norma MT-11, Colección textos legales n° 020.00.14, Servicio social de higiene y seguridad del trabajo, Madrid, Spain, 1978. 33p. Illus. 8 ref.

CIS 78-1401 Sansone E.B., Tewari Y.B.
The permeability of laboratory gloves to selected solvents.
Material from laboratory gloves (thickness 0.2-0.5mm) of natural rubber, neoprene, these 2 combined, nitrile rubber, polyvinyl chloride and polyvinyl alcohol was used as barrier between 22 common solvents and water or n-hexane. Nearly all gloves tested were permeable to the solvents. Gloves should not be assumed to provide full protection. When working with hazardous materials, gloves should be discarded immediately following overt contamination. Gloves should not be reused.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1978, Vol.39, No.2, p.169-174. Illus. 26 ref.

1977

CIS 78-1093
ZH 1/570, Federation of Industrial Mutual Accident Insurance Associations (Hauptverband der gewerblichen Berufsgenossenschaften), Bonn, Sep. 1977.
Information sheet on protective gloves
Schutzhandschuh-Merkblatt [in German]
This information sheet gives technical data on various types of protective gloves and indicates the particular industrial sectors in which each type of glove is used. The information mainly concerns: glove materials, resistance, dimensions and design.
Carl Heymanns Verlag KG, Gereonstrasse 18-32, 5000 Köln 1, Germany (Fed.Rep.), 1977. 20p. Illus. Price: DM.2.00.

CIS 78-970 Oniščenko V.Ja.
Gloves for protection against vibration
Vibrozaščitnye rukavicy [in Russian]
Description of a simple solution to the problem of damping vibration transmitted from a tool handle to the operator's hand: lengths of soft rubber tubing cut lengthwise (semitubular) were fixed to the prehensile surface of a mitten, slotted into parallel grooves stiched in quilted seams in the palm of the mitten, with the convex side of the semi-tube outwards. These protective gloves were favourably commented on by workers when tests were carried out in a fettling shop for foundry pieces.
Mašinostroitel', July 1977, No.7, p.23. Illus.

CIS 78-813 Weeks R.W., Dean B.J.
Permeation of methanolic aromatic amine solutions through commercially available glove materials.
Permeation time of aniline, p-chloroaniline, p-toluidine, 4,4'-methylenedianiline and methylenebis(2-chloroanaline) (all in methanol solution) was measured with 8 glove materials. The materials used were natural latex, Hypalon/Neoprene, Hypalon, Neoprene, butyl, polyethylene, nitrile and polyvinyl chloride. Gloves from the composite material were, in certain cases, inferior to those made from a single material. The glove material and construction were more important than the thickness of the material. When the concentration of the amine is high, the gloves should be used only once. More quantitative information is necessary before occupational health scientists can confidently prescribe adequate worker protection apparel for specific exposure situations.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1977, Vol.38, No.12, p.721-725. Illus. 9 ref.

CIS 78-197 Cook W.I., Fletcher W.G.
A report on the performance of linemen's rubber insulating gloves
This report presents the results of a study of the extent of compliance of 12 models (chosen randomly from 155 available models) of gloves with the American National Standards Institute J6.6 standard. AC voltage, thickness, design and dimensions, tensile strength, elongation, insulation resistance, and tension set were tested. In general, the gloves were in compliance.
DHEW (NIOSH) Publication No.77-196, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, Ohio 45226, USA, July 1977. 18p. 5 ref.

CIS 77-2066 Roed-Petersen J., Hjorth N., Jordan W.P., Bourlas M.
Postsorters' rubber fingerstall dermatitis.
An outbreak of dermatitis in a Danish post office caused by minute amounts of isopropylphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (IPPD) in fingerstalls is reported. The manufacturer denied the presence of IPPD in the fingerstalls, and the question of declaration of contents is discussed.
Contact Dermatitis, June 1977, Vol.3, No.3, p.143-147. Illus. 6 ref.
http://www.sigov.si/mddsz/uvzd/predpisi/uveljav/zdr_preg/prev_zdr_preg.htm [in Slovenian]
http://objave.uradni-list.si/bazeul/URED/2002/087/B/5243672827.htm [in Slovenian]

CIS 77-1114 Coletta G.C., Arons I.J., Ashley L.E., Drennan A.P.
The development of firefighters' gloves - Vol.I. Glove requirements; Vol.II. Glove criteria and test methods.
This study determines requirements for firefighters' gloves by analysis of hand and wrist injury statistics and of firefighters' task-oriented needs. Aspects covered include: hand protection requirements (resistance to cuts, punctures, heat penetration (thermal injury: burns), wet heat penetration; cold (frostbite, freezing) and electricity); dexterity, resistance to liquids, comfort, resistance to flame, durability; drying; glove design and sizing, glove classifications; deficiencies of currently used gloves; new standards for gloves; conclusions and recommendations. Much of the information is in tabular form. Test procedures for the above requirements. Appendices: hand and wrist injury statistics, glove materials, etc.
DHEW Publication No.(NIOSH)77-134-A and 77-134-B, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, Ohio 45226, USA, Feb. 1976. 97p. (Vol.1), 179p. (Vol.2). Illus. 65 ref.

1976

CIS 77-2016
DIN 4841, Teil 1, German Standards Institute (Deutsches Institut für Normung), Berlin (West), Dec. 1976.
Protective gloves
Schutzhandschuhe [in German]
This standard, which prescribes safety specifications under the Act of 24 June 1968 respecting technical equipment in industry, applies to gloves for protection against mechanical, chemical and thermal effects. The safety features and technical data given in this standard concern: form and dimensions of gloves; soluble substances content of materials used for their manufacture; mechanical and electrical resistance. Corresponding test conditions and methods.
Beuth Verlag GmbH, Burggrafenstrasse 4-7, D-1000 Berlin 30. 4p. Illus. Price: DM.10.40.

CIS 77-1107 Chéron J., Guenier J.P., Moncelon B., Lima.
Resistance of protective gloves to industrial solvents - Recapitulation
Résistance des gants de protection aux solvants industriels - Tableaux récapitulatifs. [in French]
Previous numbers of the journal gave results of tests with some hundred pairs of protective gloves against very aggressive or widely used solvents: trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, trichloroethane, toluene, white spirit, cyclohexane, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, ethyl acetate, ethanol. These results are recapitulated here, the gloves being listed according to supplier and model, and to the type of elastomer employed.
Travail et sécurité, Dec. 1976, No.12, p.554-561.

CIS 77-502 Balocco L.
Personal protection - Protection of upper limbs and trunk
Protezione personale: difesa degli arti superiori e del corpo [in Italian]
Description, with numerous examples, of the protective functions and features of protective gloves (leather, plastics, special fabrics), barrier creams and protective clothing (against aggressive substances, toxic gases, cold, contamination, fire and radiant heat), and certain fabrics used in the manufacture of protective clothing. A French translation may be obtained from INRS, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France.
Rivista di meccanica, Jan. 1976, No.610, p.51-56; Feb. 1976, No.611, p.25-29. Illus.

CIS 77-498 Resistance of protective gloves to industrial solvents - Results obtained with ethanol on some 100 types of commercial gloves
Résistance des gants de protection aux solvants industriels - Résultats obtenus avec l'éthanol sur une centaine de gants du commerce. [in French]
Results of tests carried out by the French National Research and Safety Institute (INRS) on the deterioration of gloves by soaking them in the solvent (combined mechanical and chemical actions), permeability to the solvent and time taken for the solvent to pass through the glove. The findings are classified on a qualitative scale, graded according to how the gloves are used, and accompanied by advice for users.
Travail et sécurité, Nov. 1976, No.11, p.509-516. Illus.

CIS 77-203 Chéron J.
Resistance of protective gloves to industrial solvents - Results obtained with ethyl acetate on some hundred commercial gloves
Résistance des gants de protection aux solvants industriels - Résultats obtenus avec l'acétate d'éthyle sur une centaine de gants du commerce. [in French]
Results of tests carried out by the French National Research and Safety Institute (INRS) to determine the effect of dipping gloves into the solvent (combined chemical and mechanical and chemical actions), permeability to the solvent and time taken for the solvent to pass through the glove. The results are tabulated on a qualitative scale of assessment according to the type of use. Practical advice to users is given.
Travail et sécurité, Sep. 1976, No.9, p.421-428. Illus.

1975

CIS 77-152 Skutilová J.
Acute impairment due to methyl iodide
Akutní poškození metyljodidem [in Czech]
Case study of skin damage due to methyl iodide in a female employee of a chemicals firm who handled this product, wearing rubber gloves. No systemic reaction was observed. The gloves prevented the methyl iodide from evaporating and allowed it to penetrate the skin. Wearing rubber gloves when handling this substance should be discouraged and the use of barrier creams recommended. This case study is preceded by a literature survey on the properties and toxicology of methyl iodide.
Pracovní lékařství, Nov. 1975, Vol.27, No.10, p.341-342. 8 ref.

CIS 76-1408 Chéron J.
Resistance of protective gloves to industrial solvents - Results obtained with methyl ethyl ketone
Résistance des gants de protection aux solvants industriels - Résultats obtenus avec la méthyléthylcétone. [in French]
Results of tests carried out by the French National Research and Safety Institute (INRS) to determine the damage caused to these gloves by dipping them into solvent (combined mechanical and chemical action), permeability to the solvent and time taken for the solvent to pass through the glove. The results are presented in tabular form with a qualitative scale of assessment of each glove according to the purpose for which it is used, with practical advice for users of different glove types given in a separate column.
Travail et sécurité, Dec. 1975, No.12, p.585-592.

CIS 76-1276 Marczyk J.
Methods for study of the efficacy of personal protective equipment against vibration - Part 2. Measurement of the efficacy of protective equipment for the hands
Metody badania skuteczności antywibracyjnych ochron osobistych - Część 2: Metoda badań skuteczności zabezpieczeń przed wibracją oddziałującą na ręce [in Polish]
A brief review of methods employed to evaluate the efficacy of protective equipment for the upper limbs is followed by an illustrated description of 2 measurement systems to determine the coefficient transmission to the hand of vibration produced by a vibrator and a pneumatic hammer. The testing technique is described. Measurements were made by means of a sensor attached at the metacarpal extremity of the middle finger of the hand holding the vibratory tool.
Prace Centralnego instytutu ochrony pracy, 1975, Vol.25, No.87, p.342-355. Illus. 12 ref.

CIS 76-1099 Chéron J.
Resistance of protective gloves to industrial solvents - Results obtained with acetone on some 100 types of commercial gloves
Résistance des gants de protection aux solvants industriels - Résultats obtenus avec l'acétone sur une centaine de gants du commerce. [in French]
Results of tests carried out by the French National Research and Safety Institute (INRS) on the deterioration of gloves by soaking them in the solvent (combined mechanical and chemical actions) permeability to the solvent and time taken for the solvent to pass through the glove. The findings are categorised on a qualitative scale, graded according to how the gloves are used, and accompanied by advice for users.
Travail et sécurité, Oct. 1975, No.10, p.471-478. Illus.

CIS 75-2005 Chéron J.
Resistance of protective gloves to industrial solvents - Results obtained with cyclohexane on 100 commercial gloves.
Résistance des gants de protection aux solvants industriels - Résultats obtenus avec le cyclohexane sur une centaine de gants du commerce. [in French]
Presents the results of tests carried out by the French National Research and Safety Institute (Institut national de recherche et de sécurité - INRS) on the deterioration of gloves by soaking them in the solvent (combined mechanical and chemical actions), permeability to the solvent and speed of solvent passage across the glove. The findings are set out in a table with a qualitative scale, graded according to how the gloves are used (prolonged contact, frequent dipping, etc.) and accompanied by advice to users. An offprint of this article has been published (Edition INRS No.521).
Travail et sécurité, Feb. 1975, No.2, p.87-94. Illus.

CIS 75-1994 Almeida Proença A., De Campos Pimentel C.A.
Personal protective equipment - Gloves
Equipamento de proteção pessoal - Luvas [in Portuguese]
Monograph based on a census survey in which representatives of manufacturers and users of protective gloves participated. Contents: purpose of the survey; data obtained; general remarks on protection of the hands; agents causing injury to the hands (hard, cutting, abrasive, etc. objects; electricity; heat; chemical substances, ionising radiation and X-rays; liquids); materials used in the manufacture of protective gloves (skins and hides of various origins; vulcanised rubber; neoprene; PVC; hexanol; fabric; felt; wool; asbestos; metal mesh, wire mesh), specifications and contraindications. Definitions.
Coleção SESI No.18, Serviço social da industria, Departamento regional de São Paulo, Viaduto Doma Paulina 80, São Paulo, Brazil, 3rd edition, 1975. 86p. Illus. 3 ref.

1974

CIS 75-2058 Skilled safety management curbs hand and body injuries.
In the United States hand and body injuries account for nearly 75% of disabling industrial accidents. The programme for hand and body protection at Lukens Steel Company is described. Comprehensive accident reporting, personal protective equipment testing, and thorough training for foremen and workers are main parts of the programme. "Near-miss" accident reports are also followed up as if they were actual accident reports. The article emphasises the active support of top management and effective communications which contribute to a great extent to the success of the programme.
Occupational Hazards, Apr. 1974, Vol.36, No.4, p.35-38, 40. Illus.

CIS 75-1622 Dekker J.C., Pel H.J., Sieswerda D.
Illusory safety when working with dimethylformamide
Schijnzekerheden bij het werken met dimethylformamide [in Dutch]
The introduction of a new electrolyte containing dimethylformamide (DMF) in the manufacture of capacitors prompted a series of tests to assess the permeability of gloves formerly used for protection against an electrolyte containing dimethylacetamide. The test results showed that natural rubber and neoprene are very permeable to DMF, while Hypalon and polyethylene gave much better results. The permeability was lowest with Buta-Sol, which is based on butyl rubber.
Tijdschrift voor sociale geneeskunde, 22 Nov. 1974, Vol.52, No.23, p.860-862. Illus. 6 ref.

CIS 75-791 Chéron J.
Resistance of protective gloves to industrial solvents - Results obtained with white spirit on some 100 types of commercial gloves
Résistance des gants de protection aux solvants industriels - Résultats obtenus avec le white-spirit sur une centaine de gants du commerce. [in French]
Results of dipping tests carried out by the French National Research and Safety Institute (INRS) on gloves (combined mechanical and chemical action), on permeability to the solvent and time taken for the solvent to pass through the glove. These results are categorised by qualitative rating, with appropriate indications according to the service or type of use for which the glove is intended. This information is accompanied by advice for users. Article published in the form of an offprint fold-out data sheet (No.506).
Travail et sécurité, June 1974, No.6, p.299-306. Illus.

1973

CIS 74-2001 Chéron J.
Resistance of protective gloves to industrial solvents - Results obtained with trichloroethane on 100 commercial gloves
Résistance des gants de protection aux solvants industriels - Résultats obtenus avec le trichloréthane sur une centaine de gants du commerce. [in French]
Presents the results of tests carried out by the French National Research and Safety Institute on the deterioration of gloves by soaking them into the solvent (combined mechanical and chemical actions), permeability to the solvent and speed of solvent passage across the glove. The findings are set out in a table with a qualitative scale, graded according to how the gloves are used (prolonged contact, frequent dipping, etc.) and accompanied by advice to users.
Travail et sécurité, Oct. 1973, No.10, p.493-498. Illus.

CIS 74-1383 Laurent A.
Improving the tolerance of protective gloves worn by cement workers affected by dermatitis, using a local anticholinergic
Amélioration de la tolérance des gants de protection chez les cimentiers atteints de dermite sous l'effet d'un anticholinergique local. [in French]
MD thesis. Clinical picture, frequency, forensic medical aspects and pathogenesis of cement workers' dermatitis of the hand, and skin diseases in general, due to the effects of cement, the chemical properties of which partly explain these symptoms. The author examines the various work posts involving exposure to cement and various conventional means of prevention, to be superseded in future by more efficient methods (in particular, the use of Diphemanil or N,N-dimethyl-4-piperidylidene-1,1-diphenylmethane methylsulfate). A pharmacological and bibliographical study of these substances is followed by the results of conclusive tests made to improve the comfort of impervious protective gloves by wearing inside gloves of jersey cloth impregnated with an anticholinergic marketed in France under the name of Prantal.
Université de Lille, Faculté de médecine Necker-Enfants malades, Paris, France, 1973. 85p. 98 ref.

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