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Inorganic sulfur compounds - 587 entries found

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  • Inorganic sulfur compounds

1988

CIS 90-581 Lodge J.P.
Methods of air sampling and analysis
Chapters of this manual cover: general techniques; carbon compounds; halogens and halogen compounds; metals, inorganic nitrogen compounds and oxidants; particulate matter; radioactivity; sulfur compounds; methods for workplace air and for biological samples; reviews of areas in which methods have not yet been standardised. Tables of conversion factors are included. The 133 methods presented have been standardised and adopted by 7 US professional societies. They include statements of applicable concentration ranges, interferences, precision and accuracy.
Lewis Publishers, Inc., 121 South Main Street, P.O. Drawer 519, Chelsea, MI 48118, USA, 3d ed., 1989. 763p. Illus. 1369 ref. Price: USD 80.00 (USD 64.00 for members of certain professional societies).

CIS 90-59 Sulfur dioxide
Dwutlenek siarki [in Polish]
Chemical safety information sheet. Permissible exposure limit (Poland) = 10mg/m3.
Centralny Instytut Ochrony Pracy, 1 Ul. Tamka, 00-349 Warszawa 30, Poland, 1988. 2p.

CIS 90-269 Brandt-Rauf P.W., Fallon L.F., Tarantini T., Idema C., Andrews L.
Health hazards of fire fighters: Exposure assessment
To assess the types and levels of exposure encountered by firefighters, members of the Buffalo Fire Department (USA) were monitored during firefighting activities with personal, portable, ambient environmental sampling devices. The results indicate that firefighters are frequently exposed to significant concentrations of hazardous materials including carbon monoxide, benzene, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, aldehydes, hydrogen chloride, dichlorofluoromethane, and particulates. In many cases of the worst exposure to these materials, respiratory protective equipment was not used owing to the visual impression of low smoke intensity. Many of these materials have been implicated in cardiovascular, respiratory, or neoplastic diseases. This may provide an explanation for the alleged increased risk of developing such diseases among firefighters.
British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1988, Vol.45, No.9, p.606-612. Illus. 30 ref.

CIS 90-242 Schmider F.
Descent into manholes - The air in manholes may be deadly
Einsteigen in Schächte - Die Luft im Schacht kann tödlich sein [in German]
Carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide are the most hazardous gases that may occur in manholes. Two examples are used to illustrate that natural ventilation may not suffice to remove all toxic concentrations. Manholes must be supplied with fresh air forced all the way to the bottom. In addition, measurements of the CO2, CH4 and O2 concentrations are necessary prior to entry.
Humane Produktion - Humane Arbeitsplätze, 1988, Vol.10, No.8, p.6-9.

CIS 89-1876 Steenland K., Schnorr T., Beaumont J., Halperin W., Bloom T.
Incidence of laryngeal cancer and exposure to acid mists
To determine the relation between exposure to acid mist and laryngeal cancer, the smoking habits, drinking habits, and incidence of laryngeal cancer among 879 male steelworkers exposed to acid mists during pickling operations were ascertained. These men had an average duration of exposure of 9.5 years. Exposures to sulfuric acid in the 1970s averaged about 0.2mg/m3, and earlier exposures were probably similar. Nine workers with laryngeal cancer were identified. Using data from national surveys of cancer incidence as referent rates, 3.44 laryngeal cancers would have been expected. Excess smoking by the exposed cohort compared with the United States population resulted in an upward adjustment of the expected number of cases of laryngeal cancer to 3.92. The standardised incidence rate ratio for laryngeal cancer was 2.30 (9/3.92). The finding of excess laryngeal cancer in this cohort is consistent with four other studies published since 1981.
British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Nov. 1989, Vol.45, No.11, p.766-776. Illus. 23 ref.

CIS 89-1931 Musk A.W., Peach S., Ryan G.
Occupational asthma in a mineral analysis laboratory
An epidemic of symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma in workers in a mineral analysis laboratory necessitating exposure to vapours of hydrochloric, hydrofluoric, nitric, perchloric, and sulfuric acid solutions was investigated. Variable airflow obstruction was confirmed by serial measurement of FEV1 in 2 subjects who showed 18% and 22% falls in FEV1 during a workshift. Of a workforce of 21 laboratory staff, 20 took part in a study of ventilatory capacity and bronchial reactivity. All but one subject had normal ventilatory capacity but 5 had bronchial hyperreactivity. Four of the 5 with hyperreactivity had a history of chest tightness at work. In 2 of 4 subjects with hyperreactivity, bronchial reactivity has returned to normal after 205 and 376 days away from work, suggesting that bronchial inflammation resulted from occupational exposure to acid vapours.
British Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1988, Vol.45, No.6, p.381-386. Illus. 18 ref.

CIS 89-1460 Carbon disulfide
Dwusiarczek wegla [in Polish]
Chemical safety information sheet. Permissible exposure limit (Poland) = 10mg/m3.
Centralny Instytut Ochrony Pracy, 1 Ul. Tamka, 00-349 Warszawa 30, Poland, 1988. 2p.

CIS 89-1216 MacMahon B., Monson R.R.
Mortality in the US rayon industry
A retrospective cohort study was undertaken of the mortality of men exposed to carbon disulfide in the US rayon industry. The cohort consisted of 10,418 men employed between 1957 and 1979. Total mortality in the group was slightly lower than that of the comparable US population. There was no significant difference in overall mortality between the 4,448 employees who had held jobs with the greatest potential for exposure to carbon disulfide and the 3,311 workers who had no exposure. However, there was an excess of deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease among the potentially most heavily exposed (242 deaths observed, 195.6 expected). An excess of deaths from suicide (29 observed, 18.8 expected) was seen in only 1 of the 4 plants.
Journal of Occupational Medicine, Sep. 1988, Vol.30, No.9, p.698-705. 16 ref.

CIS 89-597 Schmidt P.
Zentralinstitut für Arbeitsmedizin der DDR
Biological monitoring methods in occupational medicine
Biologische Kontrollmethoden in der Arbeitsmedizin [in German]
Manual for occupational health care personnel and inspectors. Chapters cover: the value of laboratory diagnosis to the occupational physician; biological exposure tests as a component of medical surveillance of workers exposed to harmful substances; toxicological bases of exposure assessment; exposure to substances in the general environment as a part of total exposure; principles of genetics applicable to the evaluation of exposure tests; recognition and evaluation of carcinogens, mutagens, teratogens and embryotoxic substances; variations in the pollution of workplace air; sampling; the analytical laboratory; assessment of the reliability and validity of biological exposure tests; properties, analysis and monitoring of 21 substances or groups of substances.
VEB Volk und Gesundheit, Berlin, German Democratic Republic, 1988. 464p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index.

CIS 88-1994 Klingberg J., Beviz A., Ohlson C.G., Tenhunen R.
Disturbed iron metabolism among workers exposed to organic sulfides in a pulp plant
Eighteen workers exposed to sulfides at a pulp and paper plant were examined and compared with individually matched non-exposed referents. The exposure levels of methylmercaptan, dimethylsulfide, and dimethyldisulfide were low. However, 5 subjects were exposed to high levels of short duration, and their data were analysed separately. The activity of the enzymes delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase and heme synthase in reticulocytes, characteristics of the erythrocytes, and the iron status were analysed. A minor decrease, not statistically significant, was observed for the enzymes among the 5 highly exposed subjects. However, the concentrations of iron and transferrin were elevated and the concentration of ferritin was low in comparison with the corresponding levels of the referents. This combination will not occur spontaneously. A previous study indicated that sulfides may inhibit heme synthesis, and the present study suggests that they may also disturb iron metabolism.
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, Feb. 1988, Vol. 14, No.1, p.17-20. Illus. 7 ref.

CIS 88-1590 Vathenen A.S., Emberton P., Wales J.M.
Hydrogen sulphide poisoning in factory worker
Case study. A worker was accidentally exposed to hydrogen sulfide at levels 50-400ppm. He suffered temporary loss of consciousness, followed by changes in emotional behaviour and a subendocardial infarction. Abnormalities in his ECG subsisted for 5 months after the incident.
Lancet, 6 Feb. 1988, Vol.I, No.8580, p.305. 3 ref.

CIS 88-767 Sulfuric acid
Acide sulfurique [in French]
Chemical safety information sheet. Exposure limits (France, 1984): TWA = 1mg/m3; ceiling value = 3mg/m3. Acute toxicity: corrosion and irritation of skin and mucous membranes; delayed pulmonary oedema; chemical burns. Chronic toxicity: dental erosion; respiratory disorders. EEC identification number and labelling codes: No.016-020-00-8; C, R35, S2, S26, S30.
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1988. 5p. Bibl.

1987

CIS 02-1092 Sulfamic acid
Acide sulfamique [in French]
Chemical safety information sheet. Update of data sheet already summarized in CIS 85-1642. Synonyms: amidosulfuric acid; sulfamidic acid. Acute toxicity: irritation of the digestive mucus membranes and digestive disorders (ingestion); irritation of the skin and eyes of degree varying with the concentration, which can give rise to burns. Chronic toxicity: irritation of the skin; lesions of the hands (from handling of the product in bags). Complete datasheet collection on CD-ROM analysed under CIS 02-1407.
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Rev.ed., CD-ROM CD 613, 2002. 3p. 12 ref.

CIS 90-729 Carbon disulfide
Chemical hazard summary. Toxicity: irritation of eyes; skin absorption; neurotoxic effects; peripheral nerve diseases; cardiovascular diseases.
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, 250 Main St. East, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 1H6, Canada, 1987. 12p.

CIS 90-143 Vasin Ju.P., Bortnikov M.M., Krjukova I.V., Gurlev V.G.
Using a modified water-glass binder to improve working conditions of casting knockout workers
Primenenie modificirovannogo židkostekol'nogo svjazujuščego v celjah ulučšenija uslovij truda vybivščikov [in Russian]
The working environment in a casting knockout operation was studied in order to improve the safety and health of workers. The results were computer processed and a mathematical model was developed. By way of improvement it was suggested that the additives ammonium sulfate and sodium sulfite be used, which improve the strength of water-glass (sodium silicate) mixtures and facilitate knocking out. This measure decreases the physical work load of the operation and helps to bring down dust levels in the workplace air.
Litejnoe proizvodstvo, Jan. 1987, No.1, p.29-30. Illus. 5 ref.

CIS 89-1586 Lukašev A.A., Zinger V.Ė.
Prophylaxis of saturnism in lead metallurgy
O profilaktike saturnizma v metallurgii svinca [in Russian]
Animal experiments to study the impact of sulfate ions on poisoning caused by lead and polymetallic mixtures showed their positive effect. Use of sulfate in drinking water for prophylaxis of harmful effects of polymetallic aerosols on workers in lead melting plants is recommended (sulfate ions intake from other sources must be taken into account).
Gigiena truda i professional'nye zabolevanija, Oct. 1987, No.10, p.40-43. Illus. 6 ref.

CIS 89-1144 Sulfur dioxide
Svaveldioxid [in Swedish]
Chemical safety information sheet taken from the Kemiska Ämnen Register (CIS 89-214). Exposure limits: TLV = 5mg/m3; ceiling value = 13mg/m3. Toxicity: irritates the skin, eyes, mucous membranes and respiratory tract; lung damage.
Arbetarskyddsnämnden, Box 3208, 103 64 Stockholm, Sweden, 1987. 2p.

CIS 89-1255 Douglas R.B., Coe J.E.
The relative sensitivity of the human eye and lung to irritant gases
Various concentrations of irritant gases were applied to the eyes of subjects through close-fitting goggles and, in separate experiments, to the lungs via a mouthpiece. Eye response was detected subjectively, lung response was measured objectively by plethysmograph and the threshold concentrations for no-response were determined. For a number of gases tested (sulphur dioxide, ammonia, butan-2-one, pentan-2-one, pentan-3-one, 3 methyl butan-2-one, formaldehyde and acrolein), the threshold concentrations for the eyes was about 1.5 times that for the lungs. Other irritants, however, can be specific for certain organs.
Annals of Occupational Hygiene, 1987, Vol.31, No.2, p.265-267. Illus. 3 ref.

CIS 89-755 Hydrogen sulfide
Svavelväte [in Swedish]
Chemical safety information sheet taken from the Kemiska Ämnen Register (CIS 89-214). Exposure limits: TLV = 14mg/m3; ceiling value = 20mg/m3. Toxicity: irritates the eyes, skin and mucous membranes; higher concentrations will block the sense of smell; at very high concentrations it will affect the central nervous system.
Arbetarskyddsnämnden, Box 3208, 103 64 Stockholm, Sweden, 1987. 3p.

CIS 89-743 Carbon disulfide
Koldisulfid; Kolsvavla [in Swedish]
Chemical safety information sheet taken from the Kemiska Ämnen Register (CIS 89-214). Exposure limit : TLV = 16mg/m3. Toxicity: irritates the sin and respiratory tract; narcotic and neurological effects; corrosive.
Arbetarskyddsnämnden, Box 3208, 10364 Stockholm, Sweden, 1987. 3p.

CIS 89-867 Drujan E.A., Sidjakina N.A.
Sampling and formaldehyde determination in workplace air
Otbor prob pri opredelenii formal'degida v vozduhe [in Russian]
Several absorber solutions were tested for their suitability for air sampling. A 0.01N solution of sulfuric acid performed best. As the solution also traps methanol and ammonia, it is especially useful for monitoring air quality in carbamide resin plants or in fibreboard plants, where formaldehyde, methanol and ammonia are all liberated simultaneously.
Gigiena i sanitarija, June 1987, No.6, p.65. Illus. 1 ref.

CIS 88-1788 Carbon disulfide
Sulfure de carbone [in French]
Chemical safety information sheet. Exposure limits (France, 1983): TWA = 30mg/m3; ceiling value = 75mg/m3. Toxicity: headaches, vision and hearing disorders, psychological disorders. Alcoholism will enhance the toxic effects of CS2.
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1987. 4p. 18 ref.

CIS 88-1990 Harper M.
Possible toxic metal exposure of prehistoric bronze workers
An attempt was made to assess the possible occupational exposure to arsenic, lead, and mercury during the Bronze Age. Archaeological, metallurgical, and historical evidence is combined to form a picture of the potential toxic hazards. In the case of arsenic, a definite picture emerges of the effect of toxicity as a useful material is abandoned for health reasons on discovery of an acceptable alternative.
British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1987, Vol.44, No.10, p.652-656. Illus. 10 ref.

CIS 88-1952 Naus C.J., McAvoy D., Broder I., Smith J.W.
A non-toxic diffusional dosimeter for sulfur dioxide
The method combined the use of a diffusional dosimeter and a relatively non-toxic buffered formaldehyde absorbing solution. The dosimeter gave reproducible results using two lots of single-backed dimethylsilicone membranes; sampling times from 1 to 7hr; sampling temperatures from 25°C to 38°C; and at face velocities from 0-600ft/min (0-3m/s). Concentrations as low as 0.05ppm were determined over a maximum sampling time of 7hr, yielding a sensitivity better than 0.35ppm.hr. Fluctuating concentrations from 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0ppm background to 10.0ppm for 1/2hr resulted in no significant error.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1987, Vol.48, No.12, p.1001-1003. Illus. 4 ref.

CIS 88-1593 Kageyama H., Nakamura Y., Kobashi H.
Baritosis - A case report
Bariumu-hai (Baritosis) ni tsuite - Jikenrei o chūshin ni [in Japanese]
The patient had worked for 5 years in a factory producing purified barium sulfate powder for medical use. His chest X-ray film was characterised by diffuse fine nodulation of a peculiar density, but he was free from any symptom. His lung function remained within the normal range. Transbronchial lung biopsy was performed. On light microscopy, the specimen consisted of pulmonary alveolar structures with a number of macrophages which contained pale yellow or brown pigments and birefringent particles in the cytoplasm. There was minimal fibrosis without fibrotic nodules. Electron microscopy showed the presence of barium and sulfur in the lung tissue.
Japanese Journal of Traumatology and Occupational Medicine, Feb. 1987, Vol.35, No.8, p.537-542. Illus. 8 ref.

CIS 88-1585 Lippmann M., Gearhart J.M., Schlesinger R.B.
Basis for a particle size-selective TLV for sulfuric acid aerosols
The occupational exposure limit for sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol in the US is 1mg/m3, with no restrictions as to droplet size. A review of the literature shows that there are two different responses to inhaled H2SO4 which need to be considered in the selection of a threshold limit value (TLV) or other occupational exposure limit. One is a reflex bronchoconstriction caused by the deposition of droplets in the larger lung airways. The other is the development and progression of chronic bronchitis caused by repeated daily exposures to droplets depositing in the central and more distal conductive airways of the lung. Since the target region for both effects is the tracheobronchial tree, a particle size-selective TLV (PSS-TLV) should be expressed in terms of thoracic particulate mass (TPM). The mass concentration limit for H2SO4 TPM should be much lower than the current TLV. A TPM-TLV of 100µg/m3 should protect nearly all workers from adverse effects.
Applied Industrial Hygiene, Sep. 1987, Vol.2, No.5, p.188-199. Illus. 73 ref.

CIS 88-1667 Molten sulphur spillage
An accident involving molten sulfur spillage from a tank truck, subsequent fire, and consequences are described. Discussed are: the incident; emergency response; subsequent events; investigation; hazards of molten sulfur.
Loss Prevention Bulletin, Dec. 1987, No.078, p.23-25. 1 ref.

CIS 88-1198 Enterline P.E., Marsh G.M., Esmen N.A., Henderson V.L., Callahan C.M., Paik M.
Some effects of cigarette smoking, arsenic, and SO2 on mortality among US copper smelter workers
This is a report on the 1949-1980 mortality experience of 6,078 white male workers who worked for at least 3yrs between 1 January 1946 and 31 December 1976 at 1 or more of 8 copper smelters. The completeness of the cohort was verified statistically, and worker exposures to arsenic, SO2, dust, nickel, cadmium, and lead were estimated from retrospective surveys. By using internal controls, a dose-response relationship for lung cancer was observed with exposure to arsenic and SO2. When cigarette smoking data were included with arsenic and SO2 exposure data in a nested case-control analysis, only smoking and arsenic were statistically significant factors. The arsenic-lung cancer relationship was confined to a single smelter where the raw materials had a high arsenic content. In the remaining smelters, mortality for all causes of death and for all cancer was not high based on comparisons with national, state, and local rates.
Journal of Occupational Medicine, Oct. 1987, Vol.29, No.10, p.831-838. 19 ref.

CIS 88-861 Sweetnam P.M., Taylor S.W.C., Elwood P.C.
Exposure to carbon disulphide and ischaemic heart disease in a viscose rayon factory
The cohort of viscose rayon workers previously followed from 1950-1964 has been reconstructed and followed up to the end of 1982. The pattern of mortality at ages 45-64 for the extended period 1950-1982 is similar to that described for 1950-1964. Spinners, the workers most heavily exposed to carbon disulfide (CS2), have a significantly higher mortality from all causes than the least exposed group. The excess mortality is largely accounted for by ischaemic heart disease (IHD) for which spinners have an SMR of 172. When mortality is related to an exposure score in the same group, both all-cause and IHD mortality increase with increasing exposure level. When this analysis is repeated covering all ages, these trends become much less pronounced and only that for IHD remains significant. Over the age of 65 there is a tendency for mortality to decline with increasing exposure. This is contrary to expectation under the usual hypothesis that CS2 promotes atherosclerosis. Instead it suggests that CS2 has some type of reversible, direct cardiotoxic or thrombotic effect. IHD and total mortality show highly significant trends with exposure among current workers but no such trends among workers who have left the industry.
British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Apr. 1987, Vol.44, No.4, p.220-227. 13 ref.

CIS 88-391 Carbon disulfide
Karbondisulfid [in Norwegian]
Chemical safety information sheet. Corrosive. Irritates the eyes and skin. Can cause pulmonary oedema. It is also absorbed through the skin. Narcotic and neurological effects. Exposure limit: Administrative standard (Norway, 1984) = 15mg/m3.
Direktoratet for arbeidstilsynet, Postboks 8103 Dep., 0032 Oslo 1, Norway, Rev.ed., May 1987. 4p.

CIS 87-1303 Forastiere F., Valesini S., Salimei E., Magliola M.E., Perucci C.A.
Respiratory cancer among soap production workers
Employment in the soap production industry in Italy has entailed some exposure to sulfuric acid vapours and nickel dusts, both agents under suspicion of being carcinogenic for the respiratory tract. A mortality study, together with an incidence study for laryngeal cancer, has been conducted among 361 men with a minimum employment of one year in soap production. Mortality from all causes was lower than expected, but lung cancer and laryngeal cancer deaths were increased, although without statistical significance. 5 new laryngeal cancer cases were detected during the study period, while about one was expected. All the men with respiratory cancer had been working for several years, and the latency time was greater than 10 years. Even though the mechanism of a causal link is difficult to assess, the possibility of a carcinogenic effect of sulfuric acid is suggested.
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, June 1987, Vol.13, No.3, p.258-260. 6 ref.

CIS 87-1334 Horvath S.M., Folinsbee L.J., Bedi J.F.
Combined effect of ozone and sulfuric acid on pulmonary function in man
Nine young men were exposed to 0.25ppm ozone (O3), 1200-1600µg/m3 sulfuric acid aerosol (H2SO4), and a combination of O3 and H2SO4. During the 2-hour exposures, the subjects exercised (ventilation = 30L/min) 3 times for 20min each. Air temperature was 35°C and relative humidity 83%. If a reaction between the combination of O3 and H2SO4 and pulmonary function occurred, pulmonary function responses may have been anticipated following the combination exposure, but no significant changes were seen. The combination of ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol at levels in excess of TLV levels do not cause pulmonary dysfunction.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1987, Vol.48, No.2, p.94-98. 21 ref.

1986

CIS 90-58 Sulfur
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: irritant; dermatitis.
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 90-56 Sodium sulfite
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: irritant; neurotoxic effects; atrophy of bone marrow.
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 89-1807 Sodium sulfide
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: irritation of skin and digestive tract; corrosive; decomposes to hydrogen sulfide and free alkali.
Indian Chemical Manufacturing Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 89-1806 Sodium hydrosulfite
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: irritation of gastrointestinal tract if swallowed.
Indian Chemical Manufacturing Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 89-1804 Sodium bisulfite
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: irritation of gastrointestinal tract if swallowed.
Indian Chemical Manufacturing Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 89-557 Makeeva E.P., Gevorkjan R.V.
Sodium sulfide determination in workplace air
Opredelenie sul'fida natrija v vozduhe rabočej zony [in Russian]
A spectrophotometric method is proposed for determining sodium sulfide in workplace air in cupro-molybdenum ore flotation, where silver is used as a flotation reagent. The ability of sodium sulfide to react with silver salts and form a coloured product is used. The lower limit of sodium sulfide determination is 5µg, and the upper 40µg. Ions of metals which form sulfides interfere with the determination.
Gigiena truda i professional'nye zabolevanija, Oct. 1986, No.10, p.54-56. Illus. 4 ref.

CIS 88-1819 Sulfuric acid
Acide sulfurique [in French]
Chemical safety information sheet. Exposure limit (ACGIH, 1986-87): TLV-TWA = 1mg/m3. Toxicity: irritation of eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema.
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, 250 Main Street East, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 1H6, Canada, 1986. 17p. 21 ref.

CIS 88-1807 Hydrogen sulfide
Sulfure d'hydrogène [in French]
Chemical safety information sheet. Exposure limit (ACGIH, 1985-86): TLV-TWA = 14mg/m3. Toxicity: irritation of eyes and respiratory tract at low concentrations; loss of sense of smell above 150ppm; exposure to concentrations above 700ppm may be rapidly fatal; neurotoxic effects.
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, 250 Main Street East, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 1H6, Canada, 1986. 18p. 44 ref.

CIS 88-1451 Copper sulfate
Chemical safety information sheet. Exposure limit: ACGIH TLV = 1mg copper/m3. Toxicity: irritates the skin and the mucous membranes.
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 88-1449 Chlorosulphonic acid
Chemical safety information sheet. Exposure limit: ACGIH TLV = 1mg sulfuric acid/m3. Toxicity: severe burns to skin and eyes; severe damage to the respiratory system.
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 88-1443 Carbone disulfide
Chemical safety information sheet. Highly flammable and explosive. Exposure limit: ACGIH TLV (skin) = 30mg/m3. Toxicity: is absorbed through the skin; strong eye irritant; inhalation exposure may lead to rapid loss of consciousness, convulsions and respiratory paralysis.
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 88-1255 Jarym-Agaeva N.T., Chubar' L.V.
Photometric determination of small quantities of hydrogen sulfide in air
Fotometričeskoe opredelenie malyh količestv serovodoroda v vozduhe [in Russian]
A new photometric method for hydrogen sulfide determination in air based on reduction of ammonium molybdate is proposed. This is highly sensitive (0.1 MAC) and precise. It was approved in a plant of the coke by-products industry in collection and sulfur recovery shops. Hydrogen sulfide concentrations determined in air ranged from 1.2 to 3.4mg/m3.
Gigiena truda i professional'nye zabolevanija, Nov. 1986, No.11, p.57. 5 ref.

CIS 88-1106 Calcium sulphate
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: dust irritates the respiratory tract and mucous membranes. Sulfur oxides are produced in case of thermal decomposition.
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 88-779 Ammonium sulphate
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: if ingested in very large quantitites, may produce ammonium poisoning.
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 88-729 Aluminium sulphate
Chemical safety information sheet. Exposure limit: ACGIH TLV = 2mg/m3. Toxicity: irritates skin, eyes and lungs.
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, India Exchange, India Exchange Place, Calcutta 700 001, India, 1986. 1p.

CIS 88-423 Sulfur dioxide
Svoveldioksyd [in Norwegian]
Chemical safety information sheet. Irritates the mucous membranes, the skin and the eyes. Contact with the liquid can lead to injuries similar to burn injuries due to its low temperature and corrosive properties. Inhalation of low concentrations provokes coughing and smarting pain and higher concentrations can lead to pulmonary oedema and paralysis of the respiratory system. Exposure limit: Administrative standard (Norway, 1984) = 5mg/m3.
Direktoratet for arbeidstilsynet, Postboks 8103 Dep., 0032 Oslo 1, Norway, Rev. ed., Feb. 1986. 4p.

CIS 88-555 Gevorkjan R.V.
Occupational hygiene issues concerned with the use of sodium sulfide in the flotation of nonferrous and rare metal ores
Voprosy gigieny truda pri primenenii sernistogo natrija dlja flotacii rud cvetnyh i redkih metallov [in Russian]
Medical examinations of workers exposed to sodium sulfide in flotation plants for nonferrous and rare metal ores were conducted, measurements of airborne sodium sulfide were performed and animal experiments were carried out. Sodium sulfide is a local irritant, is gonadotoxic, and it disturbs central nervous system function and protein and lipid metabolism on chronic inhalation exposure. Workers exposed to sodium sulfide and some reagents used in flotation enrichment of copper-molybdenic ores developed disorders of the upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and skin. Mechanisation of certain operations and use of respirators is recommended. MAC for sodium sulfide in workplace air of 0.2mg/m3 has been established.
Gigiena truda i professional'nye zabolevanija, Aug. 1986, No.8, p.30-33. 3 ref.

CIS 87-130 Sulphuric acid
Industrial uses; properties; occupational exposure limits; fire hazards and extinguishants; hazardous reactions; toxicity and biological reactions (extremely irritating, corrosive and toxic to body tissues); health surveillance; handling and storage; safety precautions; leakage and spillage; first aid.
Safety Practitioner, Nov. 1986, Vol.4, No.11, p.34-35. 6 ref.

CIS 86-1918 Carbon disulphide
Contents of this data sheet: industrial uses; properties; occupational exposure limits (8-h TWA recommended in the United Kingdom: 10ppm, 10-min short-term TWA: 30ppm); fire hazard (very high) and extinguishants to be used; hazardous reactions; toxicity and biological hazards (neurotoxin); medical surveillance; handling and storage; safety precautions; leakage and spillage; first aid.
Safety Practitioner, Apr. 1986, Vol.4, No.4, p.16-17. 10 ref.

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