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Ethers - 423 entries found

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  • Ethers

1998

CIS 99-543 Miazek-Kula M.
Bis(2-chloroethyl) ether
Eter bis(2-chloroetylowy) [in Polish]
Topics: bis(2-chloroethyl) ether; description of technique; determination in air; gas chromatography; sampling and analysis.
Podstawy i Metody Oceny Środowiska Pracy, 1998, Vol.19, p.77-81. 4 ref.

CIS 99-596
International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS)
Selected chloroalkyl ethers
Summaries in French and Spanish. Topics: carcinogens; chloromethyl methyl ether; bis(2-chloroethyl) ether; bis(chloromethyl) ether; chromosome changes; criteria document; halogenated ethers; ILO; IPCS; irritants; literature survey; lung cancer; toxic effects; toxicology; UNEP; WHO.
World Health Organization, Distribution and Sales Service, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1998. xviii, 95p. Approx. 150 ref. Price: CHF 26.00 (CHF 18.20 in developing countries).

CIS 99-525 Romaguera C., Vilaplana J.
Airborne occupational contact dermatitis from ethylene oxide
Case studies of two nurses and two assistants with contact dermatitis following an escape of ethylene oxide gas during the sterilization of hospital linen. Topics: asthma; ethylene oxide; case study; disinfectants; eczema; health care personnel; hospitals; irritants; itch; rhinitis.
Contact Dermatitis, Aug. 1998, Vol.39, No.2, p.85. 13 ref.

CIS 99-204 Caraffini S., Ricci F., Assalve D., Lisi P.
Isoflurane: An uncommon cause of occupational airborne contact dermatitis
Topics: isoflurane; case study; eczema; health care personnel; inhalation anaesthetics; operating theatres; sensitization dermatitis; skin tests.
Contact Dermatitis, May 1998, Vol.38, No.5, p.286. Illus. 5 ref.

CIS 98-1332 Morris A.D., Ratcliffe J., Dalziel K.L., English J.S.C.
Allergic contact dermatitis from epoxy propane
Topics: allergens; propylene oxide; case study; dermatitis; eczema; epoxy resins; laboratory work; sensitization dermatitis; skin tests; United Kingdom.
Contact Dermatitis, Jan. 1998, Vol.38, No.1, p.57. Illus. 2 ref.

1997

CIS 00-197 Rosell Farrás M.G., Arias Carballo M.P.
Ethylene oxide: Exposure prevention in hospitals
Óxido de etileno: prevención de la exposición en hospitales [in Spanish]
Topics: carcinogens; ethylene oxide; data sheet; disinfection of equipment; health care personnel; hospitals; limitation of exposure; Spain; threshold limit values; toxic substances.
Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1997. 4p. 5 ref.

CIS 98-776 García-Bravo B., Pérez Bernal A., García-Hernández M.J., Camacho F.
Occupational contact dermatitis from anethole in food handlers
Topics: allergy tests; bakery products industry; trans-anethole; case study; dermatitis; eczema; essential oils; sensitization dermatitis; skin allergies; skin tests.
Contact Dermatitis, July 1997, Vol.37, No.1, p.38. 7 ref.

CIS 98-812 Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) - Health risk characterisation
Topics: methyl t-butyl ether; criteria document; exposure evaluation; filling stations; irritants; limitation of exposure; neurotoxic effects; petroleum and natural gas industry; toxicity evaluation; toxicology.
European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals, Avenue E Van Nieuwenhuyse 4 (Bte 6), 1160 Bruxelles, Belgium, June 1997. 126p. 135 ref.

CIS 98-32 Epichlorohydrin
Epiclorohidrina [in Spanish]
Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Topics: chemical burns; data sheet; delayed effects; dermatitis; determination in air; elimination of spills; epichlorohydrin; explosion hazards; fire fighting; fire hazards; first aid; health hazards; hepatic damage; irritation; limitation of exposure; lung diseases; medical supervision; personal protective equipment; renal damage; respirators; skin absorption; USA; waste disposal.
Noticias de seguridad, Feb. 1997, Vol.59, No.2. 4p. Insert.

CIS 98-201 Estlander T., Jolanki R., Kanerva L.
Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from 2,3-epoxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (EPTMAC) and Kathon® LX in a starch modification factory
Topics: glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride; eczema; Finland; fungicides; pulp and paper industry; sensitization dermatitis; skin allergies; skin tests; starch.
Contact Dermatitis, Apr. 1997, Vol.36, No.4, p.191-194. Illus. 17 ref.

CIS 98-219
Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden)
Propylene oxide - Health-based calculated occupational cancer risk values
Topics: carcinogenic effects; carcinogens; propylene oxide; criteria document; Netherlands; threshold limit values; toxicity evaluation; toxicology.
Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 5406, 2280 HK Rijswijk, Netherlands, 1997. 29p. 22 ref.

1996

CIS 97-1827 Allyl glycidyl ether
Eter alilglicidílico [in Spanish]
Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may cause dermatitis and skin sensitization; may have neurotoxic effects (central nervous system).
Noticias de seguridad, Nov. 1996, Vol.58, No.11. 5p. Insert.

CIS 97-1283
Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden)
Bisphenol A and its diglycidylether: Health based recommended occupational exposure limits
In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the consequences of occupational exposure to bisphenol A and its diglycidyl ether and recommends occupational exposure limits. Main conclusions: in humans, bisphenol A causes mild irritation of the skin, eyes, nose and throat; the diglycidyl ether is a skin sensitizer. Recommended occupational exposure limits for both substances (8h TWA): 10 mg/m3 for substances in the form of inhalable dust, and 5mg/m3 for respirable dust. Skin contact with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether should be avoided. Summary in Dutch.
Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1996. 110p. 108 ref.

CIS 97-835 Martínex Romero M.C., et al.
Cytogenetic monitoring of hospital personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation, ethylene oxide and cytostatic drugs
Monitorización citogenética de profesionales de hospital expuestos ocupacionalmente a radiaciones ionizantes, óxido de etileno y citostáticos [in Spanish]
The aim of this study was to evaluate cytogenetic damage in 64 hospital workers exposed to ionizing radiation (42), ethylene oxide (14) and cytostatic drugs (8). The study also involved 30 non-exposed workers from the same hospitals. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and the sister chromatid exchange method (SCE) were used for genotoxicity assessment. CA frequency is incremented in both the group exposed to radiation and to cytostatics, but not significantly. SCE frequency is significantly higher in the group exposed to ethylene oxide. In addition, the frequency of CA and SCE is incremented in smokers.
Medicina y seguridad del trabajo, 1996, Vol.43, No.168, p.37-45. Illus. 7 ref.

CIS 97-773 1,2-Butylene oxide
Data sheet. May enter the body when breathed in. May cause mutations and damage the developing foetus and should be handled with extreme caution. May irritate the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. May cause lightheadedness and fainting. It is a flammable and reactive chemical.
New Jersey Department of Health, Right to Know Program, CN 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1996. 6p.

CIS 97-772 Bis (2-chloroethyl) ether
Data sheet. May enter the body when breathed in and through the skin. It is a carcinogen and should be handled with extreme caution. May irritate the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. May cause lung oedema.
New Jersey Department of Health, Right to Know Program, CN 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1996. 6p.

CIS 97-752 Propylene oxide
Data sheet. May enter the body when breathed in. It is a carcinogen and should be handled with extreme caution. May burn the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. May damage the eyes and lungs and lead to pneumonia. May cause dizziness, lightheadedness and fainting. It is a highly flammable and reactive chemical.
New Jersey Department of Health, Right to Know Program, CN 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1996. 6p.

CIS 97-735 1,4-Dioxane
Data sheet. May enter the body when breathed in and through the skin. It is a carcinogen and should be handled with extreme caution. Irritates the respiratory tract. May burn the eyes and skin. May cause lightheadedness, dizziness and fainting. May affect the liver and kidneys. It is a flammable liquid.
New Jersey Department of Health, Right to Know Program, CN 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1996. 6p.

CIS 97-421 Diethyl ether
Data sheet. May enter the body when breathed in. May irritate the eyes and skin. May cause drowsiness, dizziness and irregular breathing. May cause drying of the skin. It is a highly flammable liquid.
New Jersey Department of Health, Right to Know Program, CN 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-68, USA, 1996. 6p.

CIS 97-575 Angelini G., Rigano L., Foti C., Grandolfo M., Veña G.A., Bonamonte D., Soleo L., Scorpiniti A.
Occupational sensitization to epoxy resin and reactive diluents in marble workers
Ten out of 22 marble workers handling a resin containing epoxy resin and ortho-cresyl glycidyl ether (CGE) developed contact dermatitis and airborne contact dermatitis within 20 days to 2 months of exposure. The 10 symptomatic subjects all showed positive patch test reactions to the reactive diluent CGE and four of them also to epoxy resin. Some other glycidyl ethers also gave positive reactions. Possible sensitization mechanisms are discussed. The problem was partly solved by changing the type of glycidyl ether and installing exhaust ventilation along the resination line.
Contact Dermatitis, July 1996, Vol.35, No.1, p.11-16. 17 ref.

CIS 97-172 Granath F., Rohlén O., Göransson C., Hansson L., Magnusson A.L., Törnqvist M.
Relationship between dose in vivo of ethylene oxide and exposure to ethene studied in exposed workers
In vivo doses of ethylene oxide (EO) arising from ethylene exposure in plastics industry workers were estimated through haemoglobin adducts, determined in samples collected on one occasion in exposed groups. Exposure doses were estimated by using data from the hygienic surveillance programme. The results of this and of a second study with repeated blood sampling in a few persons show a metabolic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide of only 0.5%, which is unexpectedly low. The cancer risk associated with ethylene exposure was also estimated. The estimated risk of cancer due to this level of life-long exposure to ethene is 1 x 10-5 per year.
Human and Experimental Toxicology, 1996, Vol.15, p.826-833. Illus. 29 ref.

CIS 97-223
Agency for Toxic Substances and Diseases Registry (ATSDR)
Toxicological profile for methyl t-butyl ether
Contents: public health statement; health effects; chemical and physical information; production, import, use and disposal; potential for human exposure; analytical methods; regulations and advisories; glossary. Health hazards include: irritation of the eyes and skin; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system).
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Toxicology, Toxicology Information Branch, 1600 Clifton Road NE, E-29, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA, Aug. 1996. 223p. Illus. Bibl.ref.
http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp91.pdf [in English]

CIS 96-1791
Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA)
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, chloromethane, o-nitroanisole, p-nitroanisole, m-/p-chloronitrobenzene, dinitrotoluene, diphenylamine, dibutylphthalate, chlorotoluene, N-ethylaniline, dioxane
This report contains supplementary data to 11 earlier BUA Reports: di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (BUA Report No. 4), chloromethane (BUA 7, see CIS 96-906), o-nitroanisole (1-methoxy-2-nitrobenzene) (BUA 9, CIS 94-636), p-nitroanisole (BUA 10, CIS 94-997), m-/p-chloronitrobenzene (BUA 11), dinitrotoluene (BUA 12), diphenylamine (BUA 15, CIS 95-572), dibutyl phthalate (BUA 22, CIS 94-998), chlorotoluene (BUA 38), N-ethylaniline (BUA 51) and dioxane (BUA 80). The supplements are translations of reports finalized between December 1992 and June 1993.
S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1996. 221p. Bibl.ref. Price: DEM 96.00.

CIS 96-922 James D., Cain J., White J.
Health and Safety Executive
Propylene oxide - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit
Main conclusions of this criteria document: there is evidence that propylene oxide can produce severe eye irritation and skin sensitization in humans. No other conclusions can be drawn regarding toxicity, mutagenicity or carcinogenicity. Proposed maximum exposure limit: 5ppm (8h TWA).
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 38p. 83 ref. Price: GBP 10.00.

1995

CIS 99-606 Lundberg P.
Scientific basis for Swedish occupational standards XVI
Vetenskapligt Underlag för Hygieniska Gränsvärden 16 [in Swedish]
This volume consists of the consensus reports submitted by the Criteria Group at the Swedish National Institute for Working Life between July 1994 and June 1995. Topics: 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane; 2-nitropropane; aluminium; butoxyethoxyethyl acetate; diethylaminoethanol; isopropoxyethanol; propyl acetate; diethylenetriamine; diethylene glycol butyl ether; dimethyl ether; pentaerythritol; diphenylamine; diethylene glycol isobutyl ether; ethylene glycol monoisopropyl ether acetate; trimethylolpropane; criteria document; determination of exposure limits; gallium and compounds; lactates; limitation of exposure; literature survey; Sweden; toxic effects; toxicology; translation.
Arbetslivsinstitutet, Förlagstjänst, 171 84 Solna, Sweden, 1995. 94p. Bibl.ref.

CIS 97-958 Beije B.
The Nordic Expert Group for Criteria Documentation of Health Risks from Chemicals. 117. Propene
Propene (propylene, PE) is an important industrial chemical which is also present as a contaminant in urban air and cigarette smoke. PE is metabolized to propylene oxide (PO), which binds to macromolecules, i.e. haemoglobin and DNA. PE is an asphyxiant. Human data are scarce. Inhalation of PE on a long-term basis gives rise to non-neoplastic toxic changes in the nasal cavity of rats, but not of mice. In male mice there is a higher incidence of chronic focal renal inflammation. In female mice there is a higher incidence of uterine endometrial stromal polyps and, to a lesser extent, haemangiosarcoma as well as haemangiosarcoma and haemangioma combined. There are limited data on the potential health hazard to humans due to PE exposure. However, as a metabolite, PO is carcinogenic in experimental animals. It is not possible at the present time to rule out PE as a human carcinogen.
Arbetsmiljöinstitutet, Förlagstjänst, 171 84 Solna, Sweden, 1995. 38p. 115 ref.

CIS 96-1788 Lucchini R., Toffoletto F., Camerino D., Fazioli R., Ghittori S., Giglioli R., Signorini A., Alessio L.
Neurobehavioral functions in operating theatre personnel exposed to anesthetic gases
In this cross-sectional survey, 62 nursing personnel occupationally exposed to anaesthetic gases were monitored and compared with 46 unexposed hospital workers. To assess their working capacity performance, a Simple Reaction Time (SRT) test was administered before and after the work shifts. On the last day of the working week a wide range of atmospheric nitrous oxide (geometric mean 62.6ppm) and of atmospheric ethrane (geometric mean 1.3ppm) was found. The urinary N2O ranged from 4 to 297µg/L (geometric mean 26.8). At the same time an impairment of performance on the SRT test was observed in comparison to controls. The findings suggest that reversible impairments of vigilance and response speed can occur in operating theatre personnel at levels of exposure to anaesthetic gases below the TLVs adopted in Italy until recently (100ppm for N2O and 2ppm for ethrane).
Medicina del lavoro, Jan.-Feb. 1995, Vol.86, No.1, p.27-33. Illus. 21 ref.

CIS 96-257 Verraes S., Michel O.
Occupational asthma induced by ethylene oxide
This brief communication describes a case of occupational asthma in a surgeon following the use of sterile powdered latex gloves. Sensitivity testing showed no allergic reaction to the latex or the glove powder but suggested sensitization to ethylene oxide gas which was used to sterilize the gloves and was probably absorbed by the glove powder.
Lancet, 25 Nov. 1995, Vol.346, No.8987, p.1434-1435. 2 ref.

CIS 96-281
Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA)
Ethylene oxide
Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in February 1993: ethylene oxide may be absorbed by inhalation or through the skin. Acute exposure may cause irritation, erythema, oedema, blistering, corneal opalescence and respiratory obstruction. Inhalation and skin absorption may also cause systemic effects such as disorders of the central nervous system, breathing difficulties and dysrhythmia. Chronic exposure has also been reported to cause irritation and central nervous system symptoms. An increased rate of leukaemia and gastric carcinoma has been demonstrated in isolated studies but has not been verified in others. Several cases of sensitization have been reported.
S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1995. xviii, 103p. Bibl.ref.

CIS 95-2148 Lemesch K.
Occupational exposure limits for chemical substances in Israel
The ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle encounters in Israel less opposition than elsewhere; as a result, for some substances the TLV values adopted in Israel are different (usually lower) than the values recommended by ACGIH. Examples of such substances are (in parentheses - the Israeli TLV/TWA): benzene (0.6ppm); styrene (20ppm); 1,1,1-trichloroethane (200ppm); vinyl chloride (1ppm). In addition, there are substances for which there is no ACGIH-recommended value, but there is an Israeli TLV, e.g., kerosene (100mg/m3 TLV/TWA); isoflurane (2ppm, ceiling), and hard metals (0.2mg/m3, TLV/TWA).
Israel Journal of Occupational Health, 1995, Vol.1, No.1, p.33-34.

CIS 95-2185
Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA)
Butoxyethoxyethyl acetate. 1,4-Dimethoxybenzene. Acetoacetyl-m-xylidide. Pigment red 53:1
Conclusions of these criteria documents, translation of reports finalized in Aug. 1992 - Aug. 1993: animal studies indicate that butoxyethoxyethyl acetate (butyl carbitol acetate) has a low toxicity; contact dermatitis was observed in one case of occupational exposure, but only on affected skin which had been previously damaged. No data are available on the effects of 1,4-dimethoxybenzene or acetoacetyl-m-xylidide (N-(2,4-dimethylphenyl)-3-oxobutanoamide) or pigment red 53:1 (D&C red no.9) in man; animal studies indicate a low acute toxicity.
S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1995. x, 141p. Bibl.ref. Price: DEM 88.00.

CIS 95-1812 Simonsen L., Midtgård U., Lund S.P., Hass U.
Nordic Council of Ministers
Occupational neurotoxicity: Evaluation of neurotoxicity data for selected chemicals
Previously determined criteria for evaluating published data on the neurotoxicity of chemicals (see CIS 95-000) were applied to the literature on 79 common industrial chemicals. Data were too sparse to permit classification of 28. Of the rest, eight were classified as probably and 16 as possibly neurotoxic, and the following 27 as definitely neurotoxic: acrylamide, acrylonitrile, aluminium, arsenic, sodium azide, borax, boric acid, carbon monoxide, carbon disulfide, potassium cyanide, ethanol, ethylene oxide, hexachlorophene, manganese, mercury, methanol, methyl bromide, methyl butyl ketone (2-hexanone), methyl chloride, methyl methacrylate, n-hexane, nitrous oxide, styrene, thallium, toluene, trichloroethylene, triorthocresyl phosphate.
National Institute of Occupational Health, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 København Ø, Denmark, 1995. 119p. Bibl.ref.

1994

CIS 98-1404
International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS)
Brominated diphenyl ethers
Summaries in French and Spanish. Topics: animal experiments; brominated diphenyl oxides; monobromodiphenyl ether; decabromodiphenyl ether; dibromodiphenyl ether; pentabromodiphenyl ether; octabromodiphenyl ether; hexabromodiphenyl ether; tetrabromodiphenyl ether; tribromodiphenyl ether; nonabromodiphenyl ether; heptabromodiphenyl ether; criteria document; halogenated ethers; IPCS; literature survey; toxic effects; toxicology.
World Health Organization, Distribution and Sales Service, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1994. 347p. Illus. Approx. 190 ref. Price: CHF 47.00 (CHF 32.90 in developing countries).

CIS 96-897
Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden)
Methyl-t-butylether: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit
In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the effects of exposure to methyl-t-butylether (MTBE). Attention is given to: identity, physical and chemical properties, monitoring; sources of exposure; environmental levels and human exposure; guidelines and standards; toxicokinetics; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproduction toxicity, irritation and sensitization); previous evaluations by (inter)national bodies; evaluation of human health risk. The assessment of health risk of occupational exposure to MTBE is difficult because of the limited human data available and the lack of long-term animal exposure studies. Three organ systems are found to be a target in exposure by inhalation: the upper respiratory tract, the central nervous system and the liver. Based on the data available the Committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit for MTBE of 180mg/m3 (50ppm), to be averaged over an 8-hour working day (8h TWA). Also, a short term exposure limit of 360mg/m3 (100ppm), 15min TWA is recommended. Summary in Dutch.
Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1994. 75p. 34 ref.

CIS 95-2140 Fuchs J., Wullenweber U., Hengstler J.G., Bienfait H.G., Hiltl G., Oesch F.
Genotoxic risk for humans due to work place exposure to ethylene oxide: Remarkable individual differences in susceptibility
Single strand breaks of DNA of peripheral mononuclear blood cells from 97 workers exposed to ethylene oxide were analyzed by the alkaline elution method. The maximum concentration of ethylene oxide detected in the air was 16.5mg/m3 calculated as 4-h time-weighted average (4h TWA). Compared to the mean elution rate of the DNA from non-smoking workers exposed to air concentrations of ethylene oxide below the detection limit of 0.1mg/m3 (4h TWA) the non-smokers working in rooms with a concentration of ethylene oxide between 0.5mg/m3 and 2mg/m3 showed a statistically significant (P<0.05) 119% higher mean elution rate and even for the non-smokers exposed to 0.1-0.5mg/m3 of ethylene oxide a statistically significant (P<0.05) 53% higher mean elution rate was observed. In the majority of the non-smokers (67%) approximately 5-fold more DNA strand breaks were induced by ethylene oxide than in the other non-smokers.
Archives of Toxicology, 1994, Vol.68, No.6, p.343-348. 36 ref. Illus.

CIS 95-1617 Diphenyl ether
Fenil éter [in Spanish]
Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: irritation of the eyes, upper respiratory tract and skin; may affect the liver and kidneys.
Noticias de seguridad, Sep. 1994, Vol.56, No.9. 4p. Insert.

CIS 95-1739 Lanes S.F., Rothman K.J., Soden K.J., Amsel J., Dreyer N.A.
Mortality among synthetic fiber workers exposed to glycerol polyglycidyl ether
A mortality study was carried out among 8878 employees at a synthetic fibres plant that used a finishing agent containing glycerol polyglycidyl ether. No clear carcinogenic effects of glycerol polyglycidyl ether were identified, but plausible induction periods had not yet elapsed. Deaths from lung cancer appeared to be unrelated to exposure. An association for lymphoma and myeloma was based on only seven cases, although risk estimates increased with duration of exposure. Limitations of the study are discussed.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1994, Vol.25, no.5, p.689-696. 5 ref.

CIS 95-1764 Olsen G.W., Lacy S.E., Chamberlin S.R., Albert D.L., Arceneaux T.G., Bullard L.F., Stafford B.A., Boswell J.M.
Retrospective cohort mortality study of workers with potential exposure to epichlorohydrin and allyl chloride
Mortality experience was examined among 1064 workers involved in the production or use of epichlorohydrin and allyl chloride between 1957 and 1986. A follow-up study in 1989 showed no increase in mortality due to all malignant neoplasms, lung cancer, circulatory system disease or arteriosclerotic heart disease. Results are not consistent with an earlier hypothesis that epichlorohydrin exposure is associated with lung cancer and, in conjunction with allyl chloride exposure, to heart disease mortality. Limitations of the study are discussed.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Feb. 1994, Vol.25, No.2, p.205-218. 34 ref.

CIS 95-984 Jargot D., Blachère V., Cassebras M., Dieudonné M., Hecht C., Mattlet M.F.
Evidence for low-molecular-weight glycidyl derivatives in epoxy resins
Mise en évidence de dérivés glycidyliques de bas poids moléculaire dans les résines époxydiques [in French]
The presence of glycidyl ethers and oligomers is the reason for the cutaneous toxicity of certain epoxy resins. This study helped to develop an analysis protocol for identifying and determining low molecular weight (M<700) oligomers and 16 glycidyl ethers present in the products available on the French market. The analytical method and techniques were applied to some thirty resin samples supplied by manufacturers and formulators or sampled in the workplace. It is therefore possible to determine or verify the composition of a non-polymerized epoxy resin suspected of being responsible for an occupational pathology, and subsequently to carry out more specific allergological tests to identify the exact allergen responsible.
Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1994, No.157, Note No.1973-157-94, p.443-450. Illus. 13 ref.

CIS 95-997 Wendling J.M., Dietemann A., Oster J.P., Pauli G.
Occupational allergy to ethylene oxide: A case study
Allergie professionnelle à l'oxyde d'éthylène - A propos d'une observation [in French]
An isolated case of allergy to ethylene oxide in a midwife, without allergy to latex and confirmed by skin tests and provocation tests, is reported. The difficulties to confirm the diagnosis and the interpretation of the provocation tests are discussed.
Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, 1994, Vol.55, No.4, p.287-289. 15 ref.

CIS 95-675
Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA)
1,2-Propylene oxide
Irritation of the skin and eyes and in some instances eczema have been described on direct exposure to propylene oxide; skin sensitization has also been reported. Human intoxication has been observed after 10 minutes exposure at 1500ppm. Chromosome aberrations have been reported in some workers exposed to propylene oxide and other substances. Propylene oxide is carcinogenic in experimental animals.
S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1994. xvii, 122p. approx. 270 ref. Price: DEM 88.00.

CIS 95-252
International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)
IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans - Some industrial chemicals
This monograph represents the views and expert opinions of an IARC Working Group which met in Lyon, France, 15-22 February 1994. IARC final classifications: ethylene oxide is carcinogenic in humans (Group 1); styrene-7,8-oxide and acrylamide are probably carcinogenic in humans (Group 2A); propylene oxide, isoprene, styrene, 4-vinylcyclohexene and 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide are possibly carcinogenic in humans (Group 2B); ethylene, propylene, vinyl toluene, N-methylolacrylamide, methyl methacrylate and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate are not classifiable as to their carcinogenicity in humans (Group 3).
World Health Organization, Distribution and Sales Service, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1994. 560p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: CHF 90.00.

CIS 95-138 Hornung R.W., Greife A.L., Stayner L.T., Steenland N.K., Herrick R.F., Elliott L.J., Ringenburg V.L., Morawetz J.
Statistical model for prediction of retrospective exposure to ethylene oxide in an occupational mortality study
A statistical model provides a more objective procedure for retrospective exposure assessment than the usual panel of experts. A weighted multiple regression model was developed for the estimation of ethylene oxide (ETO) exposure levels for inclusion in a cohort mortality study of workers in the sterilization industry. The model explained 85% of the variability in 205 average measurements of ETO levels. The model predicted ETO exposures within 1.1ppm of reference data with a standard deviation of 3.7ppm. The arithmetic and geometric means of the 46 measurements in the reference data set were 4.6 and 2.2ppm, respectively. The model also outperformed a panel of industrial hygienists relative to the reference data in terms of both bias and precision.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1994, Vol.25, No.6, p.825-836. Illus. 17 ref.

CIS 94-1158 Glycidol
Glicidol [in Spanish]
Chemical safety sheet published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, respiratory tract and skin; dermatitis; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system).
Noticias de seguridad, Feb. 1994, Vol.56, No.2. 3p. Insert.

1993

CIS 96-1966 Chloromethyl methyl ether
Data sheet. Chloromethyl methyl ether can enter the body by inhalation and through the skin. It is a carcinogen. Irritates the lungs and the respiratory tract. May cause oedema and chronic bronchitis. Corrosive effects on the eyes and skin. It is flammable and reactive.
New Jersey Department of Health, Right to Know Program, CN 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1993. 6p.

CIS 96-1587 Diisopropyl ether
International Chemical Safety Card. Short-term exposure effects: irritates the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; swallowing the liquid may cause aspiration into the lungs with the risk of chemical pneumonitis; lowering of consciousness. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 250ppm, 1040mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991); STEL: 310ppm, 1300mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991).
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p.

CIS 96-1578 Enflurane
International Chemical Safety Card. Synonym: ethrane. Short-term exposure effects: lowering of consciousness. Long-term exposure effects: affects the liver. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 75ppm, 566mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991).
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p.

CIS 96-1240 Vinyl cyclohexene dioxide
International Chemical Safety Card. Synonym: 1-epoxyethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexane. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritates the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; congestion of the lungs. Long-term exposure effects: carcinogenic effects. Occupational exposure limits: TLV-TWA: 10ppm, 57mg/m3, A2 (Suspected Human Carcinogen) (skin) (ACGIH 1991-1992).
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p.

CIS 96-1221 Diphenyl ether
International Chemical Safety Card. Short-term exposure effects: irritates the eyes and the respiratory tract; effects on liver and kidneys when ingested. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limits: TLV-TWA: 1ppm, 7mg/m3; TLV-STEL: 2ppm, 14mg/m3.
Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p.

CIS 95-1758 Palassis J., Hartle R.W., Holtz J.L.
A method for determination of methyl tert-butyl ether in gasoline vapors and liquid gasoline samples
This article describes the development of a method for determining the presence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MBTE), in a matrix of gasoline vapours and in liquid gasoline samples, with the simultaneous analysis of benzene, toluene, xylenes and total hydrocarbons. An assessment of the method's performance based on field tests at different service stations is also included. The method recommends collection of air samples on 400- and 200-mg coconut-shell charcoal tubes in series, desorption in carbon disulfide, split-vent injection, gas chromatography (GC) analysis using a capillary column and detection by flame ionization detector. The analysis of liquid gasoline samples is accomplished by direct GC injection. The method worked well for all these samples. The majority of personal exposures to MBTE were near the detection limit. MBTE concentrations in gasoline bulk samples varied from non-detectable to 12.4 percent.
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, Nov. 1993, Vol.8, No.11, p.964-969. Illus. 9 ref.

CIS 95-1332 Teta M.J., Benson L.O., Vitale J.N.
Mortality study of ethylene oxide workers in chemical manufacturing - A 10 year update
British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1993, Vol.50. No.8, p.704-709. Illus. 19 ref. ###

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