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Amides - 479 entries found

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  • Amides

1986

CIS 88-231 Kotova N.I.
Basis of a maximum allowable concentration for carbamide in workplace air
Materialy k obosnovaniju predel'no dopustimoj koncentracii karbamida v vozduhe rabočej zony [in Russian]
67 workers exposed to carbamide (urea) in the workplace showed symptoms of vascular distony, 4.5% had dermatitis on exposed areas of the body (face, forearms, wrists). Experiments on animals showed that carbamide has a slight irritating effect on the upper respiratory tract and a general toxic effect on the liver and kidneys, and produces disorders of protein metabolism. Recommended MAC: 10mg/m3 (hazard class 3) for carbamide in workplace air.
Gigiena truda i professional'nye zabolevanija, Mar. 1986, No.3, p.43-44. 6 ref.

CIS 87-993 Antov G., Zajkov H., Mihajlova A., Dinoeva S., Kapurdov V., Dazov E.
Hygienic and toxicological characteristics of alachlor. III. Inhalation toxicity
Higienno-toksikologična harakteristika na alahlor. III. Inhalatorna toxičnost [in Bulgarian]
Rats were exposed to alachlor (Lasso) under conditions of subacute (90 days) and chronic (120 days) inhalations. The herbicide was inhaled for 6 hours daily, 5 times a week in concentrations of 49.0 and 11.0mg/m3 and 8.5 and 1.5mg/m3 respectively. The threshold of subacute action - 11.0mg/m3 - was established on the basis of clinical-laboratory, electromyographic, biochemical, morphological and electron-microscopic studies, as was the no-effect concentration for chronic inhalation - 1.5mg/m3.
Higiena i zdraveopazvane, 1986, Vol.29, No.6, p.31-37. Illus. 4 ref.

CIS 87-586 Mihajlova A., Zajkov H., Antov G., Kazakova B.
Hygienic-toxicological characteristics of alachlor. II. Dermal toxicity
Higienno-toksikologična harakteristika na alachlor - II. Dermalna toksičnost [in Bulgarian]
Alachlor was applied to albino male rats in doses of 1000, 2000 and 3000mg/kg over 90 days. Clinical, laboratory, biochemical, patho-anatomical studies showed progressive disorders in aerobic and anaaerobic metabolic processes, primarily in the liver, followed by changes in the kidneys. The dose of 1000mg/kg produced no significant effect under the conditions of the experiment.
Higiena i zdraveopazvane, 1986, Vol.29, No.4, p.35-38. Illus. 5 ref.

CIS 87-596 Zajkov H., Antov G., Mihajlova A., Kazakova B., Kapurdov V.
Hygienic-toxicological characteristic of alachlor. I. Oral toxicity
Higienno-toksikologična harakteristika na alachlor. I. Oralna toksičnost [in Bulgarian]
The oral toxicity of alachlor was studied with single (940mg/kg) and repeated (18.7 and 37.4mg/kg) administration to rats. The state of the metabolic units in liver, kidneys, brain and myocardium, under the conditions of the acute experiment, showed evidence of advancing disorders, their degree and tendency depending on the term of investigation (24th hour and 15th day). The deviations observed in the parameters studied in the chronic experiment suggest a definite dose-effect relationship and suggest changes in the normal balance of oxidation-reduction processes. The dose of 18.7mg/kg body mass could be accepted as the threshold of chronic oral action.
Higiena i zdraveopazvane, 1986, Vol.29, No.3, p.13-19. Illus. 11 ref.

CIS 87-594 Mirkova E., Zaikov H.
Studies of the mutagenic effect of the preparation Alachlor in the Ames test
Proučvanija vărhu mutagennoto deistvije na preparata Alachlor săs mikrobialnata test-sistema na Ames [in Bulgarian]
Alachlor is the active ingredient of the herbicide Lasso. The studies were carried out by the standardised incorporation method on 5 standard histidine-autotrophic strains of Salmonella. The preparation was tested in parallel series of experiments with and without metabolic activation at 8, 20, 40 and 100µg/Petri dish. Alachlor is a directly acting bacterial mutagen. It is now necessary to evaluate its mutagenicity in mammals.
Higiena i zdraveopazvane, 1986, Vol.29, No.1, p.26-31. 11 ref.

CIS 87-626 Carbamate pesticides: A general introduction
While not all the information about each of the more than 50 known carbamates is included in this report, all the different aspects of the different classes of carbamates are mentioned. Covered are: identity, physical and chemical properties, analytical methods; sources of human and environmental exposure; environmental transport, distribution, and transformation; environmental levels and human exposure; metabolism and mode of action; effects on organisms in the environment; effects on experimental animals and in vitro test systems; effects on man; names, structures and properties of individual carbamates; summary of the toxicity studies used to establish acceptable daily intakes for humans; previous reviews.
World Health Organization, Distribution and Sales Service, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1986. 137p. Illus. 271 ref. Price: SF.13.00.

CIS 87-279 Grenouillet P., Lavenant D., Picot A., Bertin O.
Bhopal: fault-tree analysis
Bhopal: l'arbre des causes [in French]
Fault-tree analysis of the circumstances and known facts connected with the Bhopal disaster.
Préventique, Aug.-Sep.-Oct. 1986, No.10, p.17-24. Illus.

CIS 86-1920 Dimethyl formamide
Contents of this data sheet: uses (industrial solvent, constituent in many productions); properties; occupational exposure limits (8-h TWA recommended in the United Kingdom: 10ppm, 10-min short-term TWA: 20ppm); fire hazards and extinguishants to be used; hazardous reactions; toxicity (moderate, but exposure can lead to irreversible liver and kidney damage) and biological hazards; handling and storage; safety precautions; possible carcinogenicity and teratogenicity; leakage and spillage; first aid.
Safety Practitioner, May 1986, Vol.4, No.5, p.48-49. 17 ref.

CIS 86-1865 Robbins P.J., Cherniack M.G.
Review of the biodistribution and toxicity of the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET)
Workers using repellent containing this compound may be exposed to more than 442g in 6 months. In human studies, variable penetration into the skin of from 9 to 56% of a topically applied dose and absorption into the circulatory system of approximately 17% have been reported. Excretion of DEET by humans was initially rapid but not as complete as in animal models. Only about 50% of the absorbed DEET was excreted by humans over 5 days. Depot storage of DEET in the skin was also documented. Skin irritant effects, including scarring bullous dermatitis in humans, were reported. One animal study that reported embryotoxicity could not be confirmed by other investigators. The limited testing for mutagenicity and carcinogenicity provided negative results. Neurotoxic effects were observed in workers exposed to 4g or more per week. Six young girls developed encephalopathies after exposure to unspecified amounts of DEET ranging from small to massive doses. Three of these girls later died. The cause of their death has not been discovered. Because of the lack of information, further research into the absorption, carcinogenicity, and neurotoxic effects of this insect repellent is needed.
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 1986, Vol.18, No.4, p.503-525. 64 ref.

CIS 86-1547 Imbriani M., Ghittori S., Prestinoni A., Longoni P., Cascone G., Gamba G.
Effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on coagulation and platelet activity
The effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on haemostatic functions, especially on platelet activity, were examined both in vitro and in vivo in 15 workers exposed to DMF (27mg/m3, median value). Twenty-eight control subjects who were not exposed to DMF, but comparable for age, anthropometric data and smoking habits were also studied. Workers exposed to DMF showed a decrease in the number of platelets and had longer coagulation times, probably due to a change caused by DMF on the membrane receptor of platelets and on the phospholipid components of the clotting system.
Archives of Environmental Health, Mar.-Apr. 1986, Vol.41, No.2, p.90-93. Illus. 17 ref.

1985

CIS 89-922 Santos S.O., Mídio A.F.
Dangers in the use of Pralidoxima in the treatment of organophosphorus and carbamate insecticide poisoning
Riscos no tratamento de intoxicações por inseticidas organofosforados e carbamatos pela Pralidoxima [in Portuguese]
Article outlining the risks of exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides (symptoms of poisoning), and the further hazards of the antidote Pralidoxima (sold as Contrathion in Brazil), when used against carbamates.
Revista brasileira de saúde ocupacional, Apr.-June 1985, Vol.13, No.50, p.47-54. Illus. 23 ref.

CIS 89-80 2-Fluoroacetamide
Fluorisasetamidi [in Finnish]
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: LD50 = 5.7mg/kg (oral exp., rat); LD50 = 80mg/kg (through skin, rat); is absorbed through skin; irritates the skin, the eyes and the respiratory tract; cardiac arrhythmia; respiratory paralysis. Mandatory European labelling: T, R26, R27, R28, S1, S2, S20, S22, S26, S45.
Register of Safety Information of Chemical Products, National Board of Labour Protection, Box 536, 33101 Tampere, Finland, Mar. 1985. 2p. Original on microfiche.

CIS 88-1470 Pyriminil
Chemical safety information sheet. Rodenticide. Toxicity: may cause death by cardiovascular collapse and respiratory failure; may cause diabetes; affects the central nervous system.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4 p.

CIS 88-812 Oxamyl
Chemical safety information sheet. Carbamate insecticide. Toxicity: cholinesterase inhibitor; is absorbed slowly through the skin and the eyes.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 88-802 Fosthietan
Chemical safety information sheet. Organophosphorus insecticide. Toxicity: is absorbed through the skin; inhibits cholinesterase; LD50 (oral, rat) = 4.7mg/kg.
In: EPA Chemcial Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 88-801 Formparanate
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity: LD50 (oral rat, RTECS 1985) = 7.2mg/kg.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 88-800 Formetanate
Chemical safety information sheet. Carbamate insecticide. Toxicity: cholinesterase inhibitor; not absorbed through the skin.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 88-799 Fenamiphos
Chemical safety information sheet. Organophosphorus insecticide. Toxicity: is absorbed through the skin; inhibits cholinesterase.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 88-786 Bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carbonitrile, 5-chloro-6((((methylamino)carbonyl)oxy)imino)-,(1s-(alpha, 2 beta, 4 alpha, 5 alpha, 6E))-
Chemical safety information sheet. Carbamate insecticide. Toxicity: LD50 (oral, rat, RTECS, 1985) = 19mg/kg; is absorbed through skin; cholinesterase inhibitor.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 88-138 Thiourea, (2-chlorophenyl)
Chemical safety information sheet. Herbicide. Toxicity: LD50 (oral, rat) = 4.6mg/kg; high oral toxicity.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 88-137 Thiocarbazide
Chemical safety information sheet. No established exposure limits. Toxicity: high by ingestion: LD (low) (NIOSH, 1985, oral, rat) = 10mg/kg.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 88-125 Promecarb
Chemical safety information sheet. Insecticide. No established exposure limit. Toxicity: is absorbed through the skin; reversible cholinesterase inhibitor; highly toxic by ingestion.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 88-81 Carbamic acid, methyl-, o-(((2,4-dimethyl-1,3-dithiolan-2-yl)methylene)amino)-
Chemical safety information sheet. Synonym: 2,4-dimethyl-2-formyl-1,3-dithiolane oxime methylcarbamate. Toxicity: DL50 (oral, rat) = 1mg/kg. Use: nematocide. No established exposure limit.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 88-46 Acrylamide
Akryyliamidi [in Finnish]
Acrylamide is a toxic agent (LD50 = 170mg/kg; TLV (8h) = 0.3mg/m3, TLV (15min) = 0.9mg/m3). Harmful if inhaled. Is absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes. Irritates the eyes, the mucous membranes of the respiratory tract and the skin. Causes muscular weakness and moving difficulties. Can damage the central nervous system. Long term effects are tiredness, muscular pain and balancing difficulties. Mandatory European labelling: T, R23, R24, R25, R33, S27, S44.
Register of Safety Information of Chemical Products, National Board of Labour Protection, Box 536, 33101 Tampere, Finland, Mar. 1985. 2p. Original on microfiche.

CIS 87-1219 2-Fluoroacetamide
Fluoriasetamidi [in Finnish]
2-fluoroacetamide is a highly toxic substance (LD50 = 5.7mg/kg (oral exposure, rat), LD50 = 80mg/kg (through the skin, rat)). It is irritant and toxic if ingested, inhaled or in contact with the skin. It is absorbed through the skin. Symptoms of poisoning are nausea, convulsions, irregular functioning of the heart and of the respiratory system, paralysis of the respiratory system. Mandatory European labelling: T, R26, R27, R28, S1, S2, S20, S22, S26, S45.
Register of Safety Information of Chemical Products, National Board of Labour Protection, Box 536, 33101 Tampere, Finland, Mar. 1985. 2p. Original on microfiche.

CIS 87-1188 Acetone thiosemicarbazide
Chemical safety information sheet. No established exposure limit. Only toxicity data available: lowest lethal dose published in the literature (oral, rat) = 10mg/kg.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 87-861 Thiourea, (2-methylphenyl)-
Highly toxic if orally ingested. No established exposure limits. No health hazard data available.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 87-846 Norbormide
Chemical safety information sheet. Moderately to highly toxic to humans. Probable human lethal dose = 50 to 500mg/kg. No established exposure limit.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 87-819 Fluoroacetamide
Chemical safety information sheet. Extremely toxic; probable human oral lethal dose is <5mg/kg. Chemically inhibits oxygen metabolism by cells with critical damage occurring in the heart, brain and lung, leading rapidly to death. Is absorbed through the skin. No established exposure limit.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 87-431 Semicarbazide hydrochloride
Chemical safety information sheet. Toxicity by ingestion. Thermal decomposition produces toxic fumes of nitrogen oxides and hydrogen chloride. No established exposure limit.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 87-135 Triamiphos
Chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical data; fire and explosion data; reactivity data; health hazards; uses (insecticide); precautions for safe handling and use.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 87-110 Metolcarb
Chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical data; fire and explosion data; reactivity data; health hazards; uses (insecticide); precautions for safe handling and use.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 87-105 Methomyl
Chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical data; fire and explosion data; reactivity data; health hazard data; use information (insecticide); precautions for safe handling and use.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 87-104 Methiocarb
Chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical data; fire and explosion data; reactivity data; health hazards; uses (herbicide); precautions for safe handling and use.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 87-82 Dimetilan
Chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical data; fire and explosion data; reactivity data; health hazards; uses (insecticide); precautions for safe handling and use.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 87-78 Chloroxuron
Chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical data; fire and explosion data; reactivity data; health hazards; uses (herbicide); precautions for safe handling and use.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 87-73 Carbofuran
Chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical data; fire and explosion data; reactivity data; health hazard data (acute poisoning); use information (insecticide); precautions for safe handling and use.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 86-1902 Dithiobiuret
Aspects covered in this data sheet: chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards; uses; handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 86-2014 Mexacarbate
Aspects covered in this data sheet: chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards; uses (insecticide); handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 86-1725 Aldicarb
Aspects covered in this data sheet: chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards; uses (pesticide); handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 86-1639 Isopropylmethylpyrazolyl dimethylcarbamate
Aspects covered in this data sheet; chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards; uses; handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 86-1615 Phenylthiourea
Aspects covered in this data sheet: chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards; uses; handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 86-1606 Thiosemicarbazide
Aspects covered in this data sheet: chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards; uses; handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 86-1565 Antu
Aspects covered in this data sheet: chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards; uses (rodenticide); handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 3p.

CIS 86-1553 Acrylamide
Aspects covered in this data sheet: chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards (suspected carcinogen); uses; handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 86-1409 Phenol, 3-(1-methylethyl)-, Methylcarbamate
Aspects covered in this data sheet: chemical identity; exposure limits; physicochemical properties; fire and explosion hazards; reactivity; health hazards; uses (pesticide); handling of spills or releases.
In: EPA Chemical Profiles, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 20460, USA, Dec. 1985. 4p.

CIS 86-1172 Zhang R. et al.
Background value of chlordimeform and its metabolites in the urine of the general population
140 persons, who never had occupational exposure to the insecticide chlordimeform, were tested for urinary chlordimeform and its metabolites. There was no significant difference between sexes or ages. The background value is 0.020 ± 0.025mg/L, the upper limits of the normal range being 0.061 and 0.078mg/L at the 95% and 99% confidence levels, respectively. These levels of chlordimeform and its metabolites in urine may be taken as reference points for monitoring people occupationally exposed to chlordimeform.
Occupational Medicine, 1985, Vol.12, No.4, p.7-8. 4 ref.

CIS 86-123 Acrylamide
Extrapolation from animal dose-effect data suggests that an absorbed dose of 0.12mg/kg body weight per day could cause adverse neurological effects in man. Acrylamide is readily absorbed through the skin and by inhalation and ingestion. Other aspects covered: properties and analytical methods; environmental distribution; toxicology; effects on animals, man and the environment.
World Health Organization, Distribution and Sales Service, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1985. 121p. Bibl. Price: SF.12.00.

CIS 86-176 Goh C.L., Ng S.K.
Photoallergic contact dermatitis to carbimazole
A dispensing assistant who worked in a pharmaceutical laboratory for 10 years developed recurrent rashes on exposed skin. Two years of detailed observation by the victim enabled him to correlate the recurrence of the rash with the production of 1 of 3 drugs in an adjoining area. Patch testing by medical personnel identified carbimazole, a thiourea derivative, as the agent responsible. A positive test was obtained only after exposure of the test site to the sun. Temporary transfer of the worker to another area during carbimazole tabletting prevented further episodes of the rash.
Contact Dermatitis, Jan. 1985, Vol.12, No.1, p.58-59. 4 ref.

CIS 85-1912 Liebowitz D.P.
Collection and determination of methyl carbamate in air
Methyl carbamate vapour is collected on silica gel tubes, desorbed with water and analysed by gas chromatography. An average collection efficiency of 96.3% was obtained at concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 6.0mg/m3. There was no loss in collection efficiency at a relative humidity of 84%.
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Sep. 1985, Vol.46, No.9, p.514-516. Illus. 1 ref.

CIS 85-1609
(Werkgroep van deskundigen van de Nationale MAC-Commissie)
Report on the exposure limit for caprolactam
Rapport inzake grenswaarde caprolactam [in Dutch]
Contents: physical and clinical properties; production and uses; exposure evaluation (air sampling, exposure tests); exposure limits (USA, USSR, Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdom, Netherlands); pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics (routes of entry, metabolism and elimination); toxic properties (animal experiments and observations in man); MAC recommendations (for caprolactam dusts: 1mg/m3; caprolactam fumes: 5ppm). In the appendix: tables showing acute and chronic toxic effects, reproductive and teratogenic effects, and dose-response relationships.
Directoraat-Generaal van de Arbeid, Postbus 69, 2270 MA Voorburg, Netherlands, Mar. 1985. 48p. 47 ref.

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