Inclusive Labour Markets, Labour Relations and Working Conditions Branch (INWORK)

Inclusive Labour Markets, Labour Relations and Working Conditions Branch (INWORK) provides technical assistance to ILO constituents and expands the knowledge base on Wages, Working Time, Working Conditions, Collective Bargaining and Labour Relations, Contractual arrangements and Labour Market Security. INWORK also leads activities on the formalization of the informal economy and coordinates the ILO Strategy to Make Decent Work a Reality for Domestic Workers. The Branch’s work covers the interplay among these key labour market institutions and their combined effect on worker protection, labour market performance and equality.

What's new

  1. Zero-Hours Work in the United Kingdom

    06 April 2018

  2. Organizing On-Demand: Representation, Voice, and Collective Bargaining in the Gig Economy

    29 March 2018

  3. Grievance handling

    19 March 2018

    Workers have rights and entitlements that are established in laws, employment contracts, collective agreements and workplace rules, as well as in custom and practice (the way things are normally done – and have been done for a long time – in a particular workplace, industry or occupation). We say that workers have a grievance when they believe that some aspect of these is not being respected by their employer. Grievances are usually described as ‘individual’ when only one worker is involved and ‘collective’ when a group of workers all believe they are suffering from the same breach of the rules. Grievances relate to addressing infringements of existing rights and entitlements, from bullying or harassment, to underpayment of wages, refusal to grant rest periods, weekly rest days or public holidays, discrimination or underpayment of bonuses or other entitlements.

  4. Industrial relations in emerging economies: The quest for inclusive development

    15 March 2018

    This work examines industrial and employment relations in the emerging economies of Brazil, China, India, South Africa and Turkey while assessing the contribution of industrial relations to inclusive development.