Multimedia

World Day for Safety and Health at Work - 28 April

  1. Campaign

    Workplace Stress: a collective challenge

Videos

  1. NEW FORMULAS FOR CHEMICAL SAFETY

    08 April 2004

    This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the Bhopal chemicals plant disaster, following which some 20,000 people died. The International Labour Organization estimates that of the two million work-related fatalities each year, nearly a quarter (439,999) are caused by chemicals. Today, World Day for Safety and Health at Work (April 28), ILO TV reports on how the Bhopal disaster has led to measures to promote safety in the workplace.

  2. Ugandan salt mining

    16 December 2003

    Fighting poverty and creating jobs is high on the agenda as African labour ministers, employers and workers meet this week in Addis Ababa for a major regional meeting of the International Labour Organization. It’s easy to see why they are concerned: half of Africa’s population, over 300 million people live in extreme poverty. Faced with no other option, the poor will do almost anything to make a living, often outside the protections of a formal workplace. But sometimes that very living threatens their lives as ILO TV reports.

  3. Adidas in Indonesia

    25 July 2003

    World sportswear giant Adidas has been working with the PT Dada factory in Indonesia amid concern about conditions in Asian garment factories in the face of increasing globalization. The company is working with the International Labour Organization to improve working conditions in the factory has become a model in the region of good labour-management relations. ILO TV has the details.

  4. UKRAINIAN HEALTH WORKERS

    29 May 2003

    New studies into health services in the former Soviet republic of Ukraine paint an alarming picture of dropping life expectancy and a rise in infectious diseases, including TB and Aids. Universal health care for all workers is no longer an option with an economy in transition and high unemployment. The International Labour Organisation and the union federation, Public Services International, found that health workers are struggling to survive on their wages and -- with the SARS virus -- there’s a new fear, as ILO TV now reports from Kiev.

  5. Danger: Children working – Guatemala fireworks industry

    20 March 2003

    More than 80 million children worldwide are employed in dangerous work, International Labour Organization figures show. In Guatemala, many work in the fireworks industry, but as ILO TV now reports, the challenge is to find poor families alternative sources of income.

  6. Surgical instruments in Pakistan

    09 September 2002

    In Pakistan, the difficult and dangerous task of manufacturing surgical instruments has often in the past been done by children. The International Labour Organization is working to put a stop to this and other hazardous forms of child labour, helping cushion the financial blow of losing part of the family income while helping the child catch up with their education. This report from ILO TV.

  7. Mine accident in Colombia

    17 July 2002

    An estimated 180 million children worldwide are trapped in some of the worst forms of child labour. An accident at a Colombian gold mine focused attention on the plight of small children forced to work for a living in hazardous conditions. This report from ILO TV.

  8. Small scale mines in Bolivia

    29 May 2002

    Mining is a dangerous occupation the world over, but in the small scale mines of Bolivia the fatality rate is 90 per cent higher than that faced by miners in industrialized countries. The dangers of makeshift mines, ranging from dust and noise to inexperience, are explained in a new manual from the International Labour Organization, as ILO TV reports.

  9. Shipbreakers

    22 October 2001

    On 20 kilometers of sloping beaches in Bangladesh, an army of men daily perform some of the world’s toughest work. Tankers that survived years of high-seasoned heavy loads are now dismantled as they were built, by hand.

  10. AIDS

    12 February 2001

    AIDS can no longer be considered as purely a medical problem. Two thirds of the nearly 36 million people infected with HIV are in their most productive years and the implications for the global work force are immense. Because of this, the workplace might just be the best place to deal a crushing blow to the spread of AIDS. ILO Television reports...