International Labour Standards and Reporting Obligations

One of the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) oldest and most important functions is the setting of International Labour Standards (ILS) as means of achieving social justice. These standards cover a wide range of subjects in the world of work and take the form of Conventions and Recommendations. Conventions are international treaties that are open to ratification by member States. By ratifying them, member States formally undertake to make their provisions effective, both in law and in practice, and to report on their application at regular intervals.

Background and rationale


One of the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) oldest and most important functions is the setting of International Labour Standards (ILS) as means of achieving social justice. These standards cover a wide range of subjects in the world of work and take the form of Conventions and Recommendations. Conventions are international treaties that are open to ratification by member States. By ratifying them, member States formally undertake to make their provisions effective, both in law and in practice, and to report on their application at regular intervals. Recommendations are non-binding instruments which provide guidance for national policy, legislation and practice. Since the foundation of the ILO in 1919, 189 Conventions and 204 Recommendations have been adopted.

The ILO has developed mechanisms for monitoring the application of ILS in law and practice which are unique at the international level.

The regular system for supervising the application of ILS is based primarily on information provided by governments in their reports on the application of ratified Conventions due in accordance with Article 22 of the ILO Constitution and on observations in this regard made by employers’ and workers’ organizations. Two bodies examine this information: the Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations and the Conference Committee on the Application of Standards. Both Committees have recalled on numerous occasions that failures to fulfil reporting obligations hinder the functioning of the supervisory system as a whole.

Indonesia is a member of the ILO since 1950. It has ratified 18 Conventions on which it has to report, including the 8 fundamental Conventions and 2 governance Conventions. In this context, the Governments and the social partners are very interested in benefitting from a specialized training course on ILS and reporting obligations, that would enable them to provide reports on the application of ratified Conventions on time and with informative and responsive content.

Objectives

General objective

The course aims to strengthen national capacity to discharge the reporting obligations on ILS under the ILO Constitution.

Specific objectives

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:
  • have a detailed knowledge of the ILO and its ILS system, from adoption to national application;
  • have an in-depth knowledge of the regular supervisory system, in particular the role of reports and how the reporting system works;
  • use the ILO's database, resources and tools relevant to ILS reporting; and
  • prepare or participate in the preparation of reports on the application of ILS.