eLearning Tools on Child Labour

  1. eLearning tools on child labour

    The eLearning tools are designed to help to better understand what child labour is and the key role ILO stakeholders can play.

Highlights

  1. Conference

    IV Global Conference on the Sustained Eradication of Child Labour, Buenos Aires, 14-16 November, 2017

    The ILO participates in the IV Global Conference on Child Labour which will bring together representatives from government, social partners, civil society, regional and international organizations to share policies and experiences in the global fight against child labour.

    Under the framework of the SDG Target 8.7, it was agreed that the IV Global Conference should cover both the sustained eradication of child labour and the elimination of forced labour and, in this context, it will also address the issue of the quality of youth employment.

International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC)

  • Our impact, their voices

    I escaped child labour and can now help others

    On the eve of International Week of the Deaf we profile a deaf Zambian man who, with ILO help, escaped child labour and discrimination and built a successful career as a teacher in the US.

  • © Evgeni Zotov

    World Day against Child Labour

    Kyrgyzstan: Looking for digital solutions to combat child labour

    The ILO in Kyrgyzstan partnered with young information technology (IT) specialists to find ways of applying innovative digital technologies to help monitor child labour.

  • World Day Against Child Labour

    Generation Safe & Healthy

    This year, the World Day Against Child Labour (WDACL) and the World Day for Safety and Health at Work (SafeDay) shine a spotlight on the global need to improve the safety and health of young workers and end child labour.

  • Towards the urgent elimination of hazardous child labour

    “Children are more vulnerable to risk than adults. Urgent action is needed to ensure no child under the age of 18 is in hazardous child labour,” says ILO Director-General Guy Ryder on the occasion of World Day against Child Labour.

  • World Day Against Child Labour 2018

    Generation Safe & Healthy!

    This year, the World Day Against Child Labour (WDACL) and the World Day for Safety and Health at Work (SafeDay) are coming together in a joint campaign to improve the safety and health of young workers and end child labour.

  • Poverty leads children from Madagascar to work in dangerous conditions

    Almost half of the 152 million victims of child labour – 73 million – toil in hazardous work. In Madagascar, children in child labour in brickmaking and in domestic work, are among those who need to be protected.

  • Giving Madagascar’s child domestic workers a second chance

    In Madagascar, driven by poverty and lack of opportunity, many children work as domestic workers in conditions that can be dangerous for their health and safety. A project of the International Labour Organization aims to reduce the number of children in domestic work through awareness-raising and skills training.

Facts and figures

  • Worldwide 218 million children between 5 and 17 years are in employment.
    Among them, 152 million are victims of child labour; almost half of them, 73 million, work in hazardous child labour.
  • In absolute terms, almost half of child labour (72.1 million) is to be found in Africa; 62.1 million in the Asia and the Pacific; 10.7 million in the Americas; 1.2 million in the Arab States and 5.5 million in Europe and Central Asia.
  • In terms of prevalence, 1 in 5 children in Africa (19.6%) are in child labour, whilst prevalence in other regions is between 3% and 7%: 2.9% in the Arab States (1 in 35 children); 4.1% in Europe and Central Asia (1 in 25); 5.3% in the Americas (1 in 19) and 7.4% in Asia and the Pacific region (1 in 14).
  • Almost half of all 152 million children victims of child labour are aged 5-11 years.
    42 million (28%) are 12-14 years old; and 37 million (24%) are 15-17 years old.
  • Hazardous child labour is most prevalent among the 15-17 years old. Nevertheless up to a fourth of all hazardous child labour (19 million) is done by children less than 12 years old.
  • Among 152 million children in child labour, 88 million are boys and 64 million are girls.
  • 58% of all children in child labour and 62% of all children in hazardous work are boys. Boys appear to face a greater risk of child labour than girls, but this may also be a reflection of an under-reporting of girls’ work, particularly in domestic child labour.
  • Child labour is concentrated primarily in agriculture (71%), which includes fishing, forestry, livestock herding and aquaculture, and comprises both subsistence and commercial farming; 17% in Services; and 12% in the Industrial sector, including mining.
Source: Global Estimates of Child Labour: Results and trends, 2012-2016, Geneva, September 2017.

Just released

  1. Child Labour Platform Brochure

    17 August 2018

  2. Child labour in herding in rural areas of Swaziland – 2014

    15 August 2018

  3. Meta-analysis of evaluations on ILO child labour programmes and projects in Africa 2009-2014

    03 July 2018

    The main purpose of this analysis is to contribute to organisational learning and to provide guidance to ILO constituents and relevant stakeholders through analysis of lessons learned and good practices, trends in effectiveness, relevance and outcomes, and factors influencing success.