International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC)

Facts and figures

  • Global number of children in child labour has declined by one third since 2000, from 246 million to 168 million children. More than half of them, 85 million, are in hazardous work (down from 171 million in 2000).
  • Asia and the Pacific still has the largest numbers (almost 78 million or 9.3% of child population), but Sub-Saharan Africa continues to be the region with the highest incidence of child labour (59 million, over 21%).
  • There are 13 million (8.8%) of children in child labour in Latin America and the Caribbean and in the Middle East and North Africa there are 9.2 million (8.4%).
  • Agriculture remains by far the most important sector where child labourers can be found (98 million, or 59%), but the problems are not negligible in services (54 million) and industry (12 million) – mostly in the informal economy.
  • Child labour among girls fell by 40% since 2000, compared to 25% for boys.

Just released

  1. Indonesia: Spotlight - Special child labour and education edition

    31 March 2015

  2. Combating child labour through education in Uganda - A policy brief

    31 March 2015

    In recent years Uganda has seen only limited progress in reducing the rate of children’s employment. Whilst the country has seen important steps to promote free elementary and secondary education some major challenges remain. Uganda has experienced the highest rate of school drop- out in Africa and many young children leave school to go into the labour market. This policy brief uses information from a recent study to suggest steps which could be taken to better address child labour through education policies and programmes.

  3. Combating child labour through education in Indonesia - A policy brief

    31 March 2015

    Over the past ten years Indonesia has made major progress in reducing the numbers of children in child labour. It has done so primarily by expanding education provision and enabling more children to attend and stay in school. The progress has been supported by the implementation of major social protection programmes providing support to poor families. However there remains a problem of child labour. This policy brief uses information from a recent study to suggest steps which could be taken to better address child labour through education policies and programmes.

Highlights

  1. Conference

    III Global Conference on Child Labour - Brasilia, 8-10 October 2013

    The ILO will participate in the III Global Conference on Child Labour which will bring together representatives from government, social partners, civil society, regional and international organizations to share policies and experiences in the global fight against child labour.

    The Conference – organized by the Brazilian Government – will be an opportunity to reflect on the progress made since the previous global conference was held in The Hague in 2010, and to discuss ways to accelerate global efforts against child labour – especially its worst forms.