eLearning Tools on Child Labour

  1. eLearning tools on child labour

    The eLearning tools are designed to help to better understand what child labour is and the key role ILO stakeholders can play.

Highlights

  1. Conference

    IV Global Conference on the Sustained Eradication of Child Labour, Buenos Aires, 14-16 November, 2017

    The ILO participates in the IV Global Conference on Child Labour which will bring together representatives from government, social partners, civil society, regional and international organizations to share policies and experiences in the global fight against child labour.

    Under the framework of the SDG Target 8.7, it was agreed that the IV Global Conference should cover both the sustained eradication of child labour and the elimination of forced labour and, in this context, it will also address the issue of the quality of youth employment.

International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC)

Facts and figures

  • Worldwide 218 million children between 5 and 17 years are in employment.
    Among them, 152 million are victims of child labour; almost half of them, 73 million, work in hazardous child labour.
  • In absolute terms, almost half of child labour (72.1 million) is to be found in Africa; 62.1 million in the Asia and the Pacific; 10.7 million in the Americas; 1.2 million in the Arab States and 5.5 million in Europe and Central Asia.
  • In terms of prevalence, 1 in 5 children in Africa (19.6%) are in child labour, whilst prevalence in other regions is between 3% and 7%: 2.9% in the Arab States (1 in 35 children); 4.1% in Europe and Central Asia (1 in 25); 5.3% in the Americas (1 in 19) and 7.4% in Asia and the Pacific region (1 in 14).
  • Almost half of all 152 million children victims of child labour are aged 5-11 years.
    42 million (28%) are 12-14 years old; and 37 million (24%) are 15-17 years old.
  • Hazardous child labour is most prevalent among the 15-17 years old. Nevertheless up to a fourth of all hazardous child labour (19 million) is done by children less than 12 years old.
  • Among 152 million children in child labour, 88 million are boys and 64 million are girls.
  • 58% of all children in child labour and 62% of all children in hazardous work are boys. Boys appear to face a greater risk of child labour than girls, but this may also be a reflection of an under-reporting of girls’ work, particularly in domestic child labour.
  • Child labour is concentrated primarily in agriculture (71%), which includes fishing, forestry, livestock herding and aquaculture, and comprises both subsistence and commercial farming; 17% in Services; and 12% in the Industrial sector, including mining.
Source: Global Estimates of Child Labour: Results and trends, 2012-2016, Geneva, September 2017.

Just released

  1. Myanmar Safe Work for Youth - Training Kit

    05 November 2018

    The “Safe work for youth” Kit includes materials designed for public administrators, employers and young people about the occupational hazards and risks faced by young workers in Myanmar in the garment, construction and fishing sectors. The kits contains a number of tools, including guidance and tips on OSH specifically for these sectors, aiming at preventing hazardous work.

  2. 3-R Trainers’ Kit on Rights, Responsibilities and Representation for Children, Youth and Families

    05 November 2018

    The Myanmar 3-R Trainers’ Kit on Rights, Responsibilities and Representation for Children, Youth and Families – or the 3-R Trainers’ Kit – is an interactive training tool for use in communities with children, youth and families, especially those at risk of child labour and trafficking of children and women for labour or sexual exploitation. The overall goal of the 3-R Trainers’ Kit is to provide life skills and work skills to children, youth and adults in their home communities, and to migrants living and working in towns and cities in their own or other countries. The increased understanding about their rights and the skills will enable them to make informed decisions about their lives, seek viable work opportunities, and increase their voice and representation in their families, communities and workplaces.

  3. Combating child labour in Myanmar: A course for Workers’ Organizations

    05 November 2018

    This course has been designed to help workers' organizations to better understand child labour, and the key role they can play to address it. This course kit also includes practical guidance, support and materials to design and conduct workshops on child labour for workers' organizations in Myanmar.