Brochure

Major results of ILO work on child labour

Since the 1990’s, the ILO has led a global effort to raise awareness of the child labour problem, to encourage member States to put in place appropriate legal and policy frameworks, and to ensure that appropriate attention is paid to child labour in wider development policies and programmes. The ILO’s most recent global estimates of child labour indicate that significant progress is being made.

Since the 1990’s, the ILO - as the UN agency which sets international standards on child labour as well as on other fundamental principles and rights at work - has led a global effort to raise awareness of the child labour problem, to encourage member States to put in place appropriate legal and policy frameworks, and to ensure that appropriate attention is paid to child labour in wider development policies and programmes.

The ILO’s most recent global estimates of child labour indicate that significant progress is being made. In the period 2000-2012, there had been a decline of over 30 percent in the number of children trapped in child labour from 246 million to 168 million. Most significant had been the accelerated decline between 2008 and 2012: 47 million fewer children in child labour, including 30 million fewer in its worst forms. This is remarkable progress over a short period of time that deserves to be pursued until all child labour is a thing of the past.

At the international level, the ILO has worked with governments, social partners and civil society in generating momentum for efforts to address child labour. Starting with the Oslo and Amsterdam Conferences of 1997, a Conference in The Hague in 2010 and a follow up Conference in Brazil in 2013, efforts have been made to build a worldwide movement of actors against child labour.

Alongside such global events, the ILO has implemented a major country based programme of work, implementing more than 200 projects aimed at tackling child labour through various interventions.