Child Labour Platform

Child Labour Platform (CLP), a win-win option for businesses and communities
Senior Officer for Corporate Social Responsibility in ILO-IPEC, explains why CLP’s tools are a win-win option for businesses and communities to address child labour.
In April 2012, the Child Labour Platform (CLP) was transferred to the International Organisation of Employers (IOE) and the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), co-chairs of the UN Global Compact Labour Working Group.

The CLP aims to identify the obstacles to the implementation of the ILO Conventions in supply chains and surrounding communities, identify practical ways of overcoming these obstacles, and catalyse collective action.

Detailed Terms of Reference of the Child Labour Platform (CLP)  can be seen here. For more information, please contact IPEC’s Senior Officer for CSR, Benjamin Smith,

Learn more about the Project.

Get Involved!

New businesses and relevant organizations are welcomed onto the Child Labour Platform (CLP) on an ongoing basis. All participants are encouraged to consult the outcome documents of previous meetings and events to be found on our "Highlights" section.

  • Do your organisation’s values target raising labour standards in the supply chain?
  • Is your organization ready for open knowledge exchange on strategies to reduce child labour in supply chains?
  • Is your organization committed to developing practical and feasible approaches to tackle child labour in its supply chain?

YES? Complete the CLP’s Membership Form and return it to

If you have any questions about your organisation’s membership of the Child Labour Platform (CLP), please contact Benjamin Smith,


  1. Compendium of hazardous child labour lists and related legislation for selected countries

    08 December 2014

    This compendium focuses on a selection of countries that are among the world’s largest suppliers of cotton, coffee, tea, tobacco, sugar, cocoa and garments.

  2. Child Labour Platform: Good Practice Notes - with recommendations for companies

    28 November 2014

    These good practices include examples of approaches that multiple companies in the textile and garments, cocoa, tourism and/or mining sectors have adopted to prevent and remediate child labour. The good practices were identified on the basis of information obtained from the CLP companies, as well as through workshops with a wider group of corporate representatives and other relevant stakeholders.

  3. Production of a Guidance Tool on “How to do Business with Respect for Children’s Right to be Free from Child Labour” - Concept Note

    13 March 2013

    This joint ILO‐International Organization of Employers (IOE) project will provide guidance on how companies can avoid child labour and contribute to child labour remediation, whether in their own operations or in their supply chains, through appropriate policies, due diligence and remediation processes.