Resources on youth employment
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Resources on youth employment

  1. Independent evaluation of the ILO's Decent Work Country Programme Strategies and Activities in North Africa 2010-2013

    30 October 2014

    This high-level evaluation (HLE) is the first cluster evaluation of the ILO’s decent work strategies and activities in the North African sub region. The evaluation assesses the Office’s support to the Governments and social partners in Algeria, Egypt, Eritrea, Libya, Morocco, South Sudan, Sudan and Tunisia in their efforts to address decent work deficits. This has involved the evaluation of sub regional strategic priorities, country strategies and “roadmaps,” technical cooperation (TC) projects and technical assistance (TA) activities carried out during 2010–13. The overarching question of the evaluation is whether ILO strategies and actions have effectively supported national constituents’ priorities and efforts to fill decent work gaps.

  2. Independent evaluation of the ILO's Decent Work Country Programme Strategies and Activities in North Africa 2010-2013 - Volume II

    29 October 2014

    Contains the annexes of case studies on Algeria, Egypt, Eritrea, Libya, Morocco, South Sudan, Sudan and Tunisia.

  3. Skills mismatch in Europe: Statistics brief

    24 October 2014

    This Statistics Brief analyzes the incidence of overeducation and undereducation (skills mismatch) in a sample of European economies. Mismatch patterns are shown to depend strongly on the measure of mismatch that is adopted, but overeducation is increasing and undereducation is decreasing on at least one measure in at least half of the countries for which such trends can be assessed. Differences in skills mismatch risk between age groups and sexes are discussed, and country-specific trends are identified.

  4. Labour market transitions of young women and men in Armenia

    15 October 2014

    This report presents the highlights of the 2012 School-to-work Transition Survey (SWTS) run together with the National Statistical Service of the Republic of Armenia (NSSRA) within the framework of the ILO Work4Youth Project.

  5. Labour market transitions of young women and men in the Occupied Palestinian Territory

    17 September 2014

    This report presents the highlights of the 2013 School-to-work Transition Survey (SWTS) run together with the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS) within the framework of the ILO Work4Youth Project.

  6. G20: Promoting better labour market outcomes for youth

    09 September 2014

    Joint ILO-OECD background paper on youth employment and apprenticeship prepared for the G20 Labour and Employment Ministerial Meeting held in Melbourne, Australia, 10-11 September 2014.

  7. Labour market transitions of young women and men in Asia and the Pacific

    27 August 2014

    This report presents the results of the School-to-work transition surveys (SWTS) implemented in five countries in the Asia-Pacific region – Bangladesh, Cambodia, Nepal, Samoa and Viet Nam – in 2012 or 2013. The indicators resulting from the surveys and analysed in this report provide a much more detailed picture of the youth in the labour market in a part of the world where labour market information is sparse and sporadic. Results show that unemployment of young people remains a matter of concern, especially among those with higher education, but that issues relating to the quality of work available to young people are of even greater relevance to the design and implementation of policy interventions.

  8. Labour market transitions of young women and men in Jamaica

    22 July 2014

    This report presents the highlights of the 2013 School-to-work Transition Survey (SWTS) run together with the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN) within the framework of the ILO Work4Youth Project.

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