Labour migration
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Labour migration

Truck driver on a construction site employing internal migrant workers from the countryside. Beijing. China.
Across the world, millions of people are on the move - doing jobs ranging from menial labour such as harvesting to computer programming. Combined, their numbers would equal the fifth most populous country on the planet. The number of migrants crossing borders in search of employment and human security is expected to increase rapidly in the coming decades due to the failure of globalization to provide jobs and economic opportunities. The ILO sees today’s global challenge as forging the policies and the resources to better manage labour migration so that it contributes positively to the growth and development of both home and host societies, as well as to the well being of the migrants themselves. In 2004, the International Labour Conference of the ILO adopted a Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration which is part of a plan of action for migrant workers agreed by ILO constituents. The Framework is part of an ILO plan of action which aims at better managing labour migration so that it contributes positively to the growth and development of both home and host societies, as well as to the well being of the migrants themselves.

Key resources

  1. UN High Level Dialogue on Migration and Development: Implications for the ILO

    Following-up on the meeting that brought together members of governments, NGO, international organisations and civil society in October 2013, and led to an eight point agenda for action on making migration work.

Watch

  1. ILO chief about migrant workers in Qatar
    CNN Quest Means Business

    ILO Director General Guy Ryder discussed accusations of forced labour and other labour violations on Qatar's World Cup and other construction sites, saying that while there had been progress to address these issues on paper, implementation is the major problem but an "eminently fixable" one.
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