Green jobs

Green jobs are central to sustainable development and respond to the global challenges of environmental protection, economic development and social inclusion. By engaging governments, workers and employers as active agents of change, the ILO promotes the greening of enterprises, workplace practices and the labour market as a whole. These efforts create decent employment opportunities, enhance resource efficiency and build low-carbon sustainable societies.


  1. © Dominique Faget / AFP 2015

    Paris climate conference

    France: Climate agreement «should be as ambitious as possible»

    27 November 2015

    As the Paris Climate Conference gets under way, ILO News spoke to Ambassador Elisabeth Laurin, France’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office in Geneva and to International Organizations in Switzerland. She talks about France’s vision on the green economy and the role the ILO and social partners can play.

  2. © Aristocrats-hat 2015

    Sustainable development

    10 action points towards a greener economy

    26 November 2015

    Just before the opening of the Paris climate conference that is expected to set new ambitious targets to move to a low-carbon economy, ILO Green Jobs Programme Coordinator Kees van der Ree outlines ten steps that can facilitate a transition to a green economy.

  3. © Le monde de la girafe 2015


    ILO key messages for the COP21

    18 November 2015

    The ILO is calling for an explicit recognition in the Paris Agreement of the importance of decent work and of the need for a just transition for all.


  1. Event

    The ILO and the United Nations Climate Change Conference

    Paris, 30 November - 11 December 2015

    The ILO is calling for the next global climate agreement to include an explicit recognition of the importance of decent work and of the need for a just transition for all.

  • The role the ILO must take up is to promote the considerable potential for creation of decent work associated with the transition to a low-carbon sustainable development path and to minimize and manage the inevitable dislocation that will accompany it."

    Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General