Publications on Collective bargaining and labour relations

2017

  1. Conditions of Work and Employment Series No. 89

    Social dialogue and economic performance - What matters for business, a review

    15 September 2017

  2. Publication

    Country baselines under the ILO Declaration Annual Review (2000-2016)

    24 July 2017

  3. Publication

    Purchasing practices and working conditions in global supply chains: Global Survey results

    09 June 2017

    Policy Brief No.10

  4. Conditions of Work and Employment Series No. 87

    Sectoral collective bargaining, productivity and competitiveness in South Africa’s clothing value chain: manufacturers between a rock and a hard place

    16 May 2017

    This working paper focusses on the role of sectoral collective bargaining in wage setting and the different factors that might account for the link between wage and productivity growth. It examines various initiatives to improve productivity in the South African clothing sector. These include sectoral framework agreements on the adoption of productivity schemes at the enterprise level, the introduction of ‘world class manufacturing techniques’, consultant-led productivity schemes, and management-designed incentive schemes introduced in consultation with workers. The study finds that sectoral-level bargaining is effective in establishing a common wage floor for the industry that also rewards more productive firms (and workers). Moreover, during a period of liberalization and industry restructuring, wage have been rising alongside increases in labour productivity. However, this link between wages and productivity was not achieved through “organized decentralization” (i.e. enterprise-level productivity bargaining within a sectoral framework agreement). Rather, it was the outcome of a “complex package of competitive strategies pursued by firms”. These included, notably, management capability and capacity and relations between retailers (‘buyers’) and manufacturers. The paper also examines the challenges experience by some manufacturers in respect of compliance with wages and the manner in which the gains are distributed in the value chain. It concludes with some ideas about the need for a new approach to collective bargaining in light of the restructuring of the clothing value chain in South Africa.

2016

  1. Conditions of Work and Employment Series No. 83

    Redistributing value added towards labour in apparel supply chains: Tackling low wages through purchasing practices

    07 October 2016

  2. Publication

    Outcome 14: Promoting the Right to Freedom of Association and the Right to Collective Bargaining (Final Evaluation Summary)

    03 June 2016

    Project: GLO/14/66/SID - Evaluation Consultant: Sandy Wark

2015

  1. Publication

    The Situation of Non-regular Public Employees in Local Government in Japan: focus on Gender

    19 December 2015

    Non-regular public employees in the local governments are increasing rapidly in Japan. According to statistics from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIAC) (2012b), there were 603,582 non-regular public employees as of April 1, 2012, compared to 455,840 from their 2005 survey or an increase of 147,742 (32%) over seven years. Out of that more recent figure, 448,742 (74.2%) were women.

  2. Publication

    Non-standard Employment in Government: An Overview from Canada and Brazil

    19 December 2015

    This report reviews the status and the implications of non-standard employment in the government in two countries: Canada and Brazil. Recent research and policy discussions have been focused on the growth of non-standard employment in the private sector in many countries.

  3. Domestic Work Policy Brief no. 8

    Domestic work voice and representation through organizing

    15 December 2015

    This document is part of a series of briefs on issues and approaches to promoting decent work for domestic workers.

  4. A policy guide

    Collective bargaining - a policy guide

    11 December 2015

    How can governments advance the effective recognition of this fundamental right? Which policies and institutions promote collective bargaining and how might they be established?