Publications

2015

  1. 13. Persons outside the labour force

    16 November 2015

    The inactivity rate is the proportion of the working-age population that is not in the labour force. Summing up the inactivity rate and the labour force participation rate (see KILM 1) will yield 100 per cent. Information on this indicator is given for 189 economies for the same standardized age groupings provided in KILM table 1a: 15+, 15-24, 15-64, 25-54, 25-34, 35-54, 55-64 and 65+.

  2. 12. Time-related underemployment

    16 November 2015

    This indicator relates to the number of employed persons whose hours of work in the reference period are insufficient in relation to a more desirable employment situation in which the person is willing and available to engage. The indicator was previously known as “visible underemployment”.

  3. 11. Long-term unemployment

    16 November 2015

    The indicators on long-term unemployment look at duration of unemployment, that is, the length of time that an unemployed person has been without work, available for work and looking for a job. KILM 11 consists of two indicators, one containing long-term unemployment (referring to people who have been unemployed for one year or longer); and the other containing different durations of unemployment.

  4. 10. Youth unemployment

    16 November 2015

    Youth unemployment is widely viewed as an important policy issue for many countries, regardless of their stage of development. For the purpose of this indicator, the term “youth” covers persons aged 15 to 24 years and “adult” refers to persons aged 25 years and over.

  5. 9. Total unemployment

    16 November 2015

    The unemployment rate is probably the best-known labour market measure and certainly one of the most widely quoted by media in many countries as it is believed to reflect the lack of employment at national levels to the greatest and most meaningful extent. Together with the employment-to-population ratio (KILM 2), it provides the broadest indicator of the labour market situation in countries that collect information on the labour force.

  6. 8. Employment in the informal economy

    16 November 2015

    The KILM 8 indicator is a measure of employment in the informal economy as a percentage of total non-agricultural employment. There are wide variations in definitions and methodology of data collection related to the informal economy. Some countries now provide data according to the 2003 guidelines concerning a statistical definition of informal employment. The KILM 9th edition contains national estimates on informal employment.

  7. 7. Hours of work

    16 November 2015

    Two measurements related to working time are included in KILM 7 in order to give an overall picture of the time that the employed throughout the world devote to work activities. The first measure relates to the hours that employed persons work per week (table 7a) while the second measure is the average annual hours actually worked per person (table 7b).

  8. 6. Part-time workers

    16 November 2015

    The indicator on part-time workers focuses on individuals whose working hours total less than “full time”, as a proportion of total employment. Because there is no internationally accepted definition as to the minimum number of hours in a week that constitute full-time work, the dividing line is determined either on a country-by-country basis or through the use of special estimations.

  9. 5. Employment by occupation

    16 November 2015

    The indicator for employment by occupation comprises statistics on jobs classified according to major groups as defined in one or more versions of the International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO).

  10. 4. Employment by sector

    16 November 2015

    The indicator for employment by sector divides employment into three broad groupings of economic activity: agriculture, industry and services. Table 4a presents data for 193 countries for the three sectors as a percentage of total employment. Although data are limited to very few years years in the majority of countries in some particular regions (such as sub-Saharan Africa, for instance), every region is covered.