Breaking through the glass ceiling. Women in management (Updated version in 2004 included)

This important study provides a vivid portrayal of national and international efforts to improve equal opportunities and promote gender equality in management. By exploring such issues as discrimination, equal remuneration and gender mainstreaming, it presents a concise overview of the glass ceiling and its effects on women around the world.

"Wirth's book presents an excellent attempt to provide an overarching framework for a debate on gender equality, since it goes beyond a description of gender discrimination in the business context. This book is stimulating reading since it provides concrete strategies to handle the problem of gender inequalities.
This report is a stepping-stone to prove that gender equality boosts enterprise productivity, spurs economic growth and improves the welfare of families. Apart from giving a comprehensive overview of the statistical data concerning women's participation on the labour market, and specifically in managerial and professional jobs, it provides many recommendations for how to address gender inequalities in an organisational (and even broader) context. Wirth's book certainly represents an important contribution to the current debate on gender equality worldwide."

Labour and Industry, December 2001, Australia

"It has current information on women in top positions in business and politics throughout the world, as well as data on educational attainment, housework and other factors affecting women in elite positions."
Gwen Moore, Associate Professor of Sociology, University at Albany, USA 2003

Women around the world have achieved higher levels of education than ever before and today represent more than 40 per cent of the global workforce. Yet their share of management positions remains unacceptably low, with just a tiny proportion succeeding in breaking through the glass ceiling. This timely study reviews the changing position of women in the labour market and in professional and managerial work. It examines obstacles to women’s career development and action taken to improve their opportunities and promote gender equality. 

This fascinating study discusses the earnings gap between men and women, as well as the occupational segregation that exists in management. It examines the situation of women managers in the area of public service as well as the financial, business and banking sectors while providing valuable figures and statistical information. 

In the same vein, the book identifies specific practices and strategies for improving women’s qualifications, thereby helping them break through the glass ceiling. The pivotal roles of education and training are covered indepth and the book addresses the various hurdles women encounter in the recruitment and promotion processes. Useful career-building strategies are offered including mentoring, networking and career tracking approaches. 

This important study provides a vivid portrayal of national and international efforts to improve equal opportunities and promote gender equality in management. By exploring such issues as discrimination, equal remuneration and gender mainstreaming, it presents a concise overview of the glass ceiling and its effects on women around the world.