Social protection
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Social protection

Access to adequate social protection is recognized by International labour standards and the UN as a basic right . It is also widely considered to be instrumental in promoting human welfare and social consensus on a broad scale, and to be conducive to and indispensable for fair growth, social stability and economic performance, contributing to competitiveness

Today, only 20 per cent of the world’s population has adequate social security coverage, and more than half lack any coverage at all. They face dangers in the workplace and poor or non-existent pension and health insurance coverage. The situation reflects levels of economic development, with fewer than 10 per cent of workers in least-developed countries covered by social security. In middle-income countries, coverage ranges from 20 to 60 per cent, while in most industrial nations, it is close to 100 per cent.

Social Protection is one of the four strategic objectives of the Decent Work agenda that define the core work of the ILO. Since its creation in 1919, ILO has actively promoted policies and provided its Member States with tools and assistance aimed at improving and expanding the coverage of social protection to all groups in society and to improving working conditions and safety at work.

The ILO has set out three main objectives reflecting the three major dimensions of social protection:
 
  1. Extending the coverage and effectiveness of social security schemes
  2. Promoting labour protection , which comprises decent conditions of work, including wages, working time and occupational safety and health, essential components of decent work
  3. Working through dedicated programmes and activities to protect such vulnerable groups as migrant workers and their families; and workers in the informal economy. Moreover, the world of work's full potential will be used to respond to the AIDS pandemic, focusing on enhancing tripartite constituents' capacity

The Social Protection Floor Initiative

Recognizing the importance of ensuring social protection for all, the United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (UNCEB) adopted, in April 2009, the Social Protection Floor Initiative, as one of the nine UN joint initiatives to cope with the effects of the economic crisis. This initiative is co-led by the International Labour Office and the World Health Organization and involves a group of 17 collaborating agencies, including United Nations agencies and international financial institutions.

The Social Protection Floor approach promotes access to essential social security transfers and social services in the areas of health, water and sanitation, education, food, housing, life and asset-savings information. It emphasizes the need to implement comprehensive, coherent and coordinated social protection and employment policies to guarantee services and social transfers across the life cycle, paying particular attention to the vulnerable groups.

Latest

  1. ILO signs agreement with g7+ group of fragile States

    21 March 2014

    On 20 March 2014, during a High-Level Meeting on Decent Work in Fragile States, the ILO and the g7+ group signed a Memorandum of Understanding on a partnership for cooperation in job creation, skills development, social protection, SSTC, migration, and labour market monitoring.

  2. Microinsurance: Much progress, but challenges remain

    21 March 2014

    Globally, an estimated 500 million people have microinsurance, up from 78 million in 2008. Craig Churchill, head of the ILO’s Microinsurance Innovation Facility, discusses the growing value and viability of this insurance mechanism aimed at low-income people.

  3. © Manuel Cohen 2014
    Why the European Social Model is still relevant

    19 March 2014

    "In some countries, key elements of the ESM have been radically transformed, and sometimes dismantled, even though they clearly were not the cause of the crisis or the budgetary deficits," says ILO Senior labour economist Daniel Vaughan-Whitehead.

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