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Singapore - Working time - 2011


LAST UPDATE

19 October 2011

SOURCES


Name of Act

Employment (Children and Young Persons) Regulations 1976. Published by the Ministry of Manpower at www.mom.gov.sg and accessed 17 October 2011.

Name of Act

Employment Act as amended up to Act 36 of 2010. Published by the Attorney General’s Chambers’ Singapore Statutes Online at http://statutes.agc.gov.sg and accessed 17 October 2011.
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Name of Act

Holidays Act 1998, Cap. 126, 1999 Revised Edition. Published by the Attorney General’s Chambers’ Singapore Statutes Online at http://statutes.agc.gov.sg and accessed 17 October 2011.

Name of Act

Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations 1996. Published by the Ministry of Manpower at www.mom.gov.sg and accessed 17 October 2011.
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Name of Act

Employment (Female Workmen) Regulations. Published by the Ministry of Manpower at www.mom.gov.sg and accessed 17 October 2011.

Other source used

Public Holidays 2012, as published by the Ministry of Manpower at www.mom.gov.sg and accessed 18 October 2011.

Other source used

Tripartite Guidelines on Flexible Work Schedules, published by the Ministry of Manpower at www.mom.gov.sg and accessed 17 October 2011.

LEGAL DEFINITIONS


Working time/working hours

The time during which an employee is at the disposal of the employer and is not free to dispose of her/his own time and movements exclusive of any intervals allowed for rest and meals.
Employment Act §2

Employee/worker

Employee means a person who has entered into or works under a contract of service with an employer and includes a workman, and any officer or employee of the Government included in a prescribed category, class or description of such officers or employees, but does not include:
(a) any seaman;
(b) any domestic worker;
(c) any person employed in a managerial or an executive position; and
(d) any person belonging to any other class of persons whom the Minister may, from time to time by notification in the Gazette, declare not to be employees for the purposes of this Act.

Workman means:
(a) any person, skilled or unskilled, who has entered into a contract of service with an employer in pursuance of which he is engaged in manual labour, including any artisanor apprentice, but excluding any seaman or domestic worker;
(b) any person, other than clerical staff, employed in the operation or maintenance of mechanically propelled vehicles used for the transport of passengers for hire or for commercial purposes;
(c) any person employed partly for manual labour and partly for the purpose of supervising in person any workman in and throughout the performance of his work (provided that when any person is employed by any one employer partly as a workman and partly in some other capacity or capacities, that person shall be deemed to be a workman unless it can be established that the time during which that workman has been required to work as a workman in any one salary period as defined in Part III has on no occasion amounted to or exceeded one-half of the total time during which that person has been required to work in such salary period);
(d) any person specified in the First Schedule (namely cleaners, construction workers, labourers, machine operators and assemblers, metal and machinery workers, train, bus, lorry and van drivers, train and bus inspectors and all workmen employed on piece rates in the premises of the employer);
(e) any person whom the Minister may, by notification in the Gazette, declare to be a workman for the purposes of the Employment Act.
Employment Act §2, First Schedule

Employer

Employer means any person who employs another person under a contract of service and includes the Government in respect of such categories, classes or descriptions of officers or employees of the Government as from time to time are declared by the President to be employees for the purposes of this Act; any statutory authority; the duly authorised agent or manager of the employer; and the person who owns or is carrying on or for the time being responsible for the management of the profession, business, trade or work in which the employee is engaged.
Employment Act §2

Overtime/overtime work

The number of hours worked in any one day or in any one week in excess of the limits as specified by law.
Employment Act §2

Part-time work(er)

An employee who is required under her/his contract of service with an employer to work for less than 35 hours a week.
Employment Act §66A(1)
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §2

Night work(er)

No definition identified.

Domestic worker

Domestic worker means any house, stable or garden servant or motor car driver, employed in or in connection with the domestic services of any private premises.
Employment Act §2

Young worker

Child is every person below the age of 12 years. Young person is a person above the age of 12.
Employment (Children and Young Persons) Regulations §§3, 4

NORMAL HOURS LIMITS


Daily hours limit


General limit

An employee shall not be required under his contract of service to work more than 8 hours per day.
Employment Act §38(1)
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 8 hours.
  • 2007: 8 hours

Exceptions

An employee may be required to work for up to 9 hours in one day where, by agreement under the contract of service between the employee and the employer, the number of hours of work on one or more days of the week is less than 8, or the number of days on which the employee is required to work in a week is not more than 5 days.

Further, the limit on daily hours does not apply to employees engaged in the fire services or in work which by its nature involves long hours of inactive or stand-by employment.

An employee may be required to work up to 12 hours in any one day if the employee has provided written and informed consent to work in accordance with the hours of work specified in §40 of the Employment Act.

Finally, the Commissioner may, after considering the operational needs of the employer and the health and safety of the employee or class of employees, by order in writing exempt an employee or any class of employees from the 8 or 12 hour limit subject to such conditions as the Commissioner thinks fit.
Employment Act §§38(1), 38(9), 40(1), 40(2), 40(3), 41A(1)
Tripartite Guidelines on Flexible Work Schedules

Special categories


» Shift work

An employee who is engaged under his contract of service in regular shift work may be required to work more than 8 hours in any one day, provided that no such employee shall under any circumstances work for more than 12 hours in any one day.
Employment Act §40(1), (3)

» Young workers

No child shall be employed as a workman for more than 6 hours in a day, or in any industrial undertaking for more than 7 hours in a day, provided that where a child or young person is attending school, the period of work put in by the child or young person and the period of school attendance shall not in the aggregate exceed 6 hours or 7 hours, respectively, in any one day except where the child or young person is employed upon work carried on in any Government or other technical school, or under any approved apprenticeship scheme.
Employment (Children and Young Persons) Regulations §§6(b), 7(b), 8

Weekly hours limit


General limit

An employee shall not be required under his contract of service to work more than 44 hours in one week.
Employment Act §38(1)
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 44 hours.
  • 2007: 44 hours
  • 1995: 44 hours.

Exceptions

An employee may be required to work for up to 48 hours in one week where, by agreement under the contract of service between the employee and the employer, the number of hours of work in every alternate week is less than 44. However, the employee cannot work for more than 88 hours in any 2 week period.

The limit on daily hours does not apply to employees engaged in the fire services or in work which by its nature involves long hours of inactive or stand-by employment.

Finally, the Commissioner may, after considering the operational needs of the employer and the health and safety of the employee or class of employees, by order in writing exempt an employee or any class of employees from any of the limits on weekly hours subject to such conditions as the Commissioner thinks fit.
Employment Act §§38(1), 38(9), 41A(1)
Tripartite Guidelines on Flexible Work Schedules

Special categories


» Shift work

An employee who is engaged under his contract of service in regular shift work may be required to work more than 8 hours in any one day, provided that the average number of hours worked over any continuous period of 3 weeks shall not exceed 44 hours per week.
Employment Act §40(1)

OVERTIME WORK


Criteria for overtime


General

An employee may be required to work overtime in the case of:
(a) accident, actual or threatened;
(b) work, the performance of which is essential to the life of the community;
(c) work essential for defence or security;
(d) urgent work to be done to machinery or plant;
(e) an interruption of work which it was impossible to foresee; or
(f) work to be performed by employees in any industrial undertaking essential to the economy of Singapore or any of the essential services as defined under Part III of the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act (Cap. 67).
Employment Act §§38(2), 40(2A)

Worker`s influence

An employee has an implied right to refuse a request to work overtime in any circumstances other than those where the employer has an express right to require the employee to perform overtime.
Employment Act §§38(2), 40(2A)
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Limits on overtime hours


General limits

An employee shall not be permitted to work overtime for more than 72 hours a month.

Except in certain circumstances, an employee must not be required to work more than 12 hours in total in one day.
Employment Act §§38(5), 38(8), 40(3)
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 72 hour per month. Maximum 12 hour limit on total daily hours (including overtime).
  • 2007: 72 hour per month. Maximum 12 hour limit on total daily hours (including overtime).
  • 1995: Maximum 12 hours a day, including overtime. 72 hours per month.

Restrictions/exceptions

No restrictions or exceptions to the 72 hour monthly limit on overtime identified.

The 12 hour daily limit on total working hours may be exceeded in the event of:
(a) accident, actual or threatened;
(b) work, the performance of which is essential to the life of the community;
(c) work essential for defence or security;
(d) urgent work to be done to machinery or plant;
(e) an interruption of work which it was impossible to foresee; or
(f) work to be performed by employees in any industrial undertaking essential to the economy of Singapore or any of the essential services as defined under Part III of the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act (Cap. 67).
Employment Act §§38(2), 38(8), 40(2A), 40(3)

Compensation for overtime work


Overtime rate(s)

If an employee works overtime at the request of the employer, he shall be paid for such extra work at the rate of not less than one and a half times his hourly basic rate of pay, irrespective of the basis on which his rate of pay is fixed.
Employment Act §38(4)
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Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: Not less than one and a half times the hourly basic rate of pay.
  • 2007: Not less than one and a half times the hourly basic rate of pay.
  • 1995: 50% premium.

Exceptions

The right to overtime compensation rates does not apply to employees engaged in the fire services or in work which by its nature involves long hours of inactive or stand-by employment.

Also, the Commissioner may, after considering the operational needs of an employer and the interests of an employee or a class of employees, by order in writing, direct that the entitlement to be paid for extra work shall not apply to that employee or class of employees, subject to such conditions as the Commissioner thinks fit.
Employment Act §§38(9), 41A(2)
Tripartite Guidelines on Flexible Work Schedules

Compensatory rest

No generally-applicable entitlement to compensatory rest for overtime work identified.
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Notice of requirement to work overtime


General provisions

No notice requirements identified.

Special categories


Part-time work

A part-time employee who works beyond his normal hours of work shall be paid for such extra work:
(a) at his hourly basic rate of pay for each hour or part thereof which exceeds his normal hours of work but does not exceed the normal hours of work of a similar full-time employee; and
(b) at one and a half times his basic hourly rate for each hour or part thereof which exceeds the normal hours of work of a similar full-time employee.
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §5
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Shift work

Any employee who is engaged under his contract of service in regular shift work and who, at the request of his employer works, more than an average of 44 hours per week over any continuous period of 3 weeks shall be paid for such extra work at the rate of not less than one and a half times his hourly basic rate of pay irrespective of the basis on which his rate of pay is fixed.
Employment Act §§38(4), 40(4)

SCHEDULES


General

No relevant provisions identified.

REST PERIODS


Rest breaks


General provisions

An employee shall not be required under his contract of service to work more than six consecutive hours without a rest break.
Employment Act §38(1)
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: No employee shall be required to work more than six consecutive hours without a rest break.
  • 2007: No employee shall be required to work more than six consecutive hours without a rest break.
  • 1995: Unspecified break after 6 hours of consecutive work.

Exceptions

An employee who is engaged in work which must be carried on continuously may be required to work for 8 consecutive hours, inclusive of a period or periods of not less than 45 minutes in the aggregate during which he shall have the opportunity to have a meal.

The right to rest breaks does not apply to employees engaged in the fire services or in work which by its nature involves long hours of inactive or stand-by employment.
Employment Act §38(1), (9)

Special categories


» Shift work

An employee who is engaged under his contract of service in regular shift work may be required to work for more than 6 consecutive hours without a rest break. Where the employee’s work must be carried on continuously, the employee may be required to work for 8 consecutive hours inclusive of a period or periods of not less than 45 minutes in the aggregate during which he shall have the opportunity to have a meal.
Employment Act §§38(1), 40(1)

» Young workers

No child shall be employed as a workman for more than 3 hours without a break of 30 minutes.
Employment (Children and Young Persons) Regulations §6(a)

Daily rest periods


Duration

No provision for daily rest identified.
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: (No general statutory provisions on daily rest.)
  • 1995: No legal provision.

Weekly rest periods


Duration


» General

Every employee shall be allowed in each week a rest day without pay of one whole day.
Employment Act §36(1)
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 1 day
  • 2007: 1 day
  • 1995: 1 day.

Day specified


» General

The weekly rest day shall be Sunday, or such other day as may be determined from time to time by the employer.
Employment Act §36(1)
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Work on weekly rest day


» Criteria

An employee may be required by his employer to work on a rest day, in the case of:
(a) accident, actual or threatened;
(b) work, the performance of which is essential to the life of the community;
(c) work essential for defence or security;
(d) urgent work to be done to machinery or plant;
(e) an interruption of work which it was impossible to foresee; or
(f) work to be performed by employees in any industrial undertaking essential to the economy of Singapore or any of the essential services as defined under Part III of the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act (Cap. 67).

In all other circumstances, an employee may not be compelled to work on a rest day unless he is engaged in work which by reason of its nature requires to be carried on continuously by a succession of shifts.
Employment Act §§37(1), 37(2), 38(2)

» Compensation (for working on a rest day)

An employee who at his own request works for an employer on a rest day shall be paid for that day:
(a) if the period of work does not exceed half his normal hours of work, a sum at the basic rate of pay for half a day’s work;
(b) if the period of work is more than half but does not exceed his normal hours of work, a sum at the basic rate of pay for one day’s work; or
(c) if the period of work exceeds his normal hours of work for one day:
(i) a sum at the basic rate of pay for one day’s work; and
(ii) a sum at the rate of not less than one and a half times his hourly basic rate of pay for each hour or part thereof that the period of work exceeds his normal hours of work for one day.

An employee (other than an essential services employee) who at the request of his employer works on a rest day shall be paid for that day:
(a) if the period of work does not exceed half his normal hours of work, a sum at the basic rate of pay for one day’s work;
(b) if the period of work is more than half but does not exceed his normal hours of work, a sum at the basic rate of pay for 2 days’ work; or
(c) if the period of work exceeds his normal hours of work for one day:
(i) a sum at the basic rate of pay for 2 days’ work; and
(ii) a sum at the rate of not less than one and a half times his hourly basic rate of pay for each hour or part thereof that the period of work exceeds his normal hours of work for one day.
Employment Act §37(2), (3), (4)
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» Prohibitions and limitations

Except in specified circumstances (accident, threat to community etc), no employee shall be compelled to work on a rest day unless he is engaged in work which by reason of its nature requires to be carried on continuously by a succession of shifts.
Employment Act §37(1)
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Special categories


» Shift workers

The employer may substitute any continuous period of 30 hours as a rest day for an employee engaged in shift work.

Where in any week a continuous period of 30 hours commencing at any time before 6 p.m. on a Sunday is substituted as a rest day for an employee engaged in shift work, such rest day shall be deemed to have been granted within the week notwithstanding that the period of 30 hours ends after the week.

An employee engaged in shift work may be compelled to work on a weekly rest day in the case of:
(a) accident, actual or threatened;
(b) work, the performance of which is essential to the life of the community;
(c) work essential for defence or security;
(d) urgent work to be done to machinery or plant;
(e) an interruption of work which it was impossible to foresee; or
(f) work to be performed by employees in any industrial undertaking essential to the economy of Singapore or any of the essential services as defined under Part III of the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act (Cap. 67).
Employment Act §§36(2), 36(3), 40(2A)

» Part-time work

The weekly rest requirement does not apply to part-time workers who work for less than 5 days a week.
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §4(3)
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» Young workers

No child or young person shall be employed as a workman on a rest day without the written permission of the Commissioner.
Employment (Children and Young Persons) Regulations §9

ANNUAL LEAVE AND PUBLIC HOLIDAYS


ANNUAL LEAVE


Qualifying period

An employee must have served an employer for a period of not less than 3 months to qualify for annual leave.
Employment Act §43(1)

Duration


» General

An employee shall be entitled to paid annual leave of 7 days in respect of the first 12 months of continuous service with the same employer, and an additional one day’s paid annual leave for every subsequent 12 months of continuous service with the same employer, subject to a maximum of 14 days of such leave.
Employment Act §43(1)
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 7 days for workers being employed for at least a period of 3 months in respect of the first 12 months of continuous service. 1 additional day of leave for every subsequent 12 months of continuous service with the same employer, subject to a maximum of 14 days of annual leave. An employee who has served an employer for a period of not less than 3 months, but who has not completed 12 months of continuous service in any year, shall be entitled to annual leave in proportion to the number of completed months of service in that year. Where an employee is granted leave of absence without pay by the employer at the request of the employee, the period of the leave shall be disregarded for the purpose of computing continuous service. 7 days in respect of the first 12 months of continuous service, and one day's annual leave for every subsequent 12 months of continuous service up to 14 days (in addition to the rest days).
  • 2007: 7 days for workers being employed for at least a period of 3 months in respect of the first 12 months of continuous service. 1 additional day of leave for every subsequent 12 months of continuous service with the same employer, subject to a maximum of 14 days of annual leave. An employee who has served an employer for a period of not less than 3 months, but who has not completed 12 months of continuous service in any year, shall be entitled to annual leave in proportion to the number of completed months of service in that year. Where an employee is granted leave of absence without pay by the employer at the request of the employee, the period of the leave shall be disregarded for the purpose of computing continuous service. 7 days in respect of the first 12 months of continuous service, and one day's annual leave for every subsequent 12 months of continuous service up to 14 days (in addition to the rest days).
  • 1995: 7 days.

» Exceptions

An employee shall forfeit his entitlement to annual leave if he absents himself from work without the permission of the employer or without reasonable excuse for more than 20% of the working days in the months or year, as the case may be, in which his entitlement to such leave accrues.
Employment Act §43(5)

Payment


» Amount

The employer shall pay the employee his gross rate of pay for every day of annual leave.
Employment Act §43(7)
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» Date of payment

No provisions specific to the regulation of pay for annual leave identified. However, all salary earned by an employee under a contract of service, other than additional payments for overtime work, shall be paid before the expiry of the 7th day after the last day of the salary period in respect of which the salary is payable.
Employment Act §21(1)

Schedule and splitting

The employer shall grant and the employee shall take such leave not later than 12 months after the end of every 12 months of continuous service and any employee who fails to take that leave by the end of such period shall thereupon cease to be entitled thereto.
Employment Act §43(6)

Special categories


» Part-time work

A part-time employee shall be entitled to paid annual leave in proportion to the entitlement of a similar full-time employee provided by section 43 of the Act.

If a part-time employee (other than a part-time employee who is required under his contract of service with his employer to work for at least 5 days, and 30 hours, a week) agrees to relinquish his entitlement to paid annual leave, his employer shall pay him an allowance which shall be incorporated in his hourly gross rate of pay.
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §7(1), (3)

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS


Number and dates

Employees are entitled to 11 public holidays under the Employment Act. In 2012, these fall on the following dates:
New Year’s Day - 1 January
Chinese New Year (two days) - 23 & 24 January
Good Friday - 6 April
Labour Day - 1 May
Vesak Day - 5 May
National Day - 9 August
Hari Raya Puasa - 19 August
Hari Raya Haji - 26 October
Deepavali - 13 November
Christmas Day - 25 December
Holidays Act §4 and Schedule
Public Holidays 2012

Payment

Every employee shall be entitled to a paid holiday at his gross rate of pay on such of the days specified in the Schedule to the Holidays Act (Cap. 126) as fall during the time that he is employed, subject to the following:
(a) by agreement between the employer and the employee any other day or days may be substituted for any one or more of the days specified in that Schedule;
(b) if any of the days specified in that Schedule falls on a rest day, the working day next following that rest day shall be a paid holiday; and
(c) if any of the days specified in that Schedule falls on a day when the employee is not required to work under his contract of service, the employer may either pay the employee for that holiday at his gross rate of pay or give the employee a day off in substitution for that holiday.
Employment Act §88(1)
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Work on Public Holidays


» Criteria

An employee may be required by his employer to work on any holiday to which he would otherwise be entitled.
Employment Act §88(4)

» Compensation

If an employee is required to work on a public holiday, he shall be paid an extra day’s salary at the basic rate of pay for one day’s work in addition to the gross rate of pay for that day and to a travelling allowance, if payable to him under the terms of his agreement with his employer, for one day.
Employment Act §88(4)
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EMERGENCY FAMILY LEAVE

No provision for emergency family leave identified.
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PART-TIME WORK


General provisions

The Minister may by regulations exclude or modify any or all of the provisions of the Employment Act in their application to any part-time employee or class of part-time employees.

Part-time employee means an employee who is required under his contract of service with an employer to work for less than 35 hours a week.
Employment Act §§66A, 66B
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §2

Limits


Daily hours limit

No daily hours limit specific to part-time employees identified. The relevant provisions of the Employment Act apply.
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §10

Weekly hours limit

No weekly hours limit specific to part-time employees identified. However, a part-time employee works, by definition, no more than 35 hours in a week.
Employment Act §66A
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §2

Overtime work

No limits on overtime work specific to part-time employees identified. The relevant provisions of the Employment Act apply.
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §10

Rest breaks

Part-time employees are entitled to rest breaks in accordance with §38(1) of the Employment Act.
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §10

Daily rest period

No entitlement to daily rest periods identified.

Weekly rest period

A part-time employee will only be entitled to a weekly rest day in accordance with the Employment Act if the employee is required to work at least 5 days in a week.

Where a part-time employee is entitled to and works on a weekly rest day, the employee will be entitled to payment in accordance with §4(1) and (2) of the Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations.
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §4

Annual leave

A part-time employee shall be entitled to paid annual leave in proportion to the entitlement of a similar full-time employee provided by section 43 of the Act.

If a part-time employee (other than a part-time employee who is required under his contract of service with his employer to work for at least 5 days, and 30 hours, a week) agrees to relinquish his entitlement to paid annual leave, his employer shall pay him an allowance which shall be incorporated in his hourly gross rate of pay.
Employment (Part-Time Employees) Regulations §7(1), (3)

Right to equal treatment


Right/scope

No relevant provision identified.

NIGHT WORK


Special categories


Young workers

No child or young person shall be employed as a workman during the night or any part thereof.
Employment (Children and Young Persons) Regulations §5
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Pregnant workers/recent birth

No female workman who is pregnant shall be employed to work during the night or part thereof unless she has for this purpose consented in writing and is not certified unfit by a medical officer or a registered medical practitioner.
Employment (Female Workmen) Regulations §3(1)
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SHIFT WORK


Criteria for shift work

No statutory criteria for shift work identified.

Limits


Daily hours limit

An employee who is engaged under his contract of service in regular shift work may be required to work more than 8 hours in any one day, provided that no such employee shall under any circumstances work for more than 12 hours in any one day.
Employment Act §40(1), (3)

Weekly limit

An employee who is engaged under his contract of service in regular shift work may be required to work more than 8 hours in any one day, provided that the average number of hours worked over any continuous period of 3 weeks shall not exceed 44 hours per week.
Employment Act §40(1)

Overtime work

Any employee who is engaged under his contract of service in regular shift work and who, at the request of his employer works, more than an average of 44 hours per week over any continuous period of 3 weeks shall be paid for such extra work at the rate of not less than one and a half times his hourly basic rate of pay irrespective of the basis on which his rate of pay is fixed.
Employment Act §§38(4), 40(4)

Rest breaks

An employee who is engaged under his contract of service in regular shift work may be required to work for more than 6 consecutive hours without a rest break. Where the employee’s work must be carried on continuously, the employee may be required to work for 8 consecutive hours inclusive of a period or periods of not less than 45 minutes in the aggregate during which he shall have the opportunity to have a meal.
Employment Act §§38(1), 40(1)

Weekly rest period

The employer may substitute any continuous period of 30 hours as a rest day for an employee engaged in shift work.

Where in any week a continuous period of 30 hours commencing at any time before 6 p.m. on a Sunday is substituted as a rest day for an employee engaged in shift work, such rest day shall be deemed to have been granted within the week notwithstanding that the period of 30 hours ends after the week.

An employee engaged in shift work may be compelled to work on a weekly rest day in the case of:
(a) accident, actual or threatened;
(b) work, the performance of which is essential to the life of the community;
(c) work essential for defence or security;
(d) urgent work to be done to machinery or plant;
(e) an interruption of work which it was impossible to foresee; or
(f) work to be performed by employees in any industrial undertaking essential to the economy of Singapore or any of the essential services as defined under Part III of the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act (Cap. 67).
Employment Act §§36(2), 36(3), 40(2A)

ON-CALL WORK


Criteria

No provisions regulating on-call work identified.

FLEXITIME


Criteria

Flexible work arrangements may be established by way of exemptions, to be granted by the Commissioner, to the daily and weekly hour limits and requirement to pay overtime rates. Such exemptions may be granted where there is compelling need for the company to operate flexibly to cope with uneven and fluctuating business cycles to optimise its manpower resources for the benefit of the company and its employees.

The Tripartite Guidelines state that, when seeking exemptions to institute flexible work arrangements, companies should:
(i) ensure employees will continue to receive their monthly basic salary during the lull periods when they work less than the contractual hours;
(ii) ensure the safety and health of the employees is not compromised as a consequence of the flexible work arrangements;
(iii) implement profit sharing or incentive schemes to share
gains derived from the efficient use of manpower and productivity improvement as a result of implementing the flexible work schedule with their employees; and
(iv) obtain the consent of representative trade unions.
Employment Act §41A
Tripartite Guidelines on Flexible Work Schedules Paragraph 6.2

Limits

Exemptions are to be granted for a specific duration of not more than 2 years in the first instance and on the condition that the company concerned will carry out regular reviews on a 6-monthly or yearly basis to ensure that the scheme can continue to achieve its objective.
Tripartite Guidelines on Flexible Work Schedules Paragraph 6.2.6

Daily hours limit

Subject to its terms, an exemption removes any limitation on the number of hours an employee may work in a day.
Employment Act §41A(1)

Weekly limit

Subject to its terms, an exemption removes any limitation on the number of hours an employee may work in a week.
Employment Act §41A

Overtime work

Subject to its terms, an exemption removes the limitation on the number of overtime hours that may be worked and the requirement to pay penalty rates for overtime worked.
Employment Act §41A(1), (2)

Rest breaks

Subject to its terms, an exemption removes the requirement to grant employees rest breaks in accordance with §38(1) of the Employment Act.
Employment Act §41A(1)

CASUAL WORK


General provisions

No provisions regulating casual work identified.

SHORT-TIME WORK/WORK-SHARING


General provisions

No provisions regulating short-time work or work-sharing arrangements identified.

RIGHT TO CHANGE WORKING HOURS


Type of changes permitted

No provisions establishing a right to change working time identified.

INFORMATION & CONSULTATION


Information

No information requirements identified, except in relation to employees who consent in writing to work in accordance with the hours of work specified in §40 of the Employment Act. In order for such consent to be valid, §§38 and 40 of the Employment Act must have been explained to the employee and the employee must have been informed of the times at which the hours of work begin and end, the number of working days in each week and the weekly rest day.
Employment Act §40(2)

Consultation

No consultation requirements identified.

Results generated on: 22nd December 2014 at 12:19:34.
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