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Egypt - Working time - 2011


LAST UPDATE

31 March 2011

SOURCES


Name of Act

Decree 113 of 2003 determining the preparatory and complementary works to be effectuated before and after the completion of work, and the guard and clean-up works, published Egyptian Wakayeh / Government Bulletin Issue 161 dated 19 July 2003; taken from The Executive Decrees of the Labour Law, March 2004, The Middle East Library for Economic Services.

Name of Act

Labour Law No. 12 of 2003, Official Journal Issue No. 14, dated 7 April 2003, published by the Middle East Library for the Economic Services
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Name of Act

Decree 122 of 2003 determining the cases or jobs in which work may continue without a break and the hard and exhausting works in which the workers are granted rest periods counted within the actual working hours, published Egyptian Wakayeh / Government Bulletin Issue 165 dated 24 July 2003; taken from The Executive Decrees of the Labour Law, March 2004, The Middle East Library for Economic Services.

Name of Act

Decree 112 of 2003 to determine the holidays considered a leave with full pay for workers, published Egyptian Wakayeh / Government Bulletin Issue 161 dated 19 July 2003; taken from The Executive Decrees of the Labour Law, March 2004, The Middle East Library for Economic Services.

Name of Act

Decree 115 of 2003 determining the works that are intermittent by their nature and in which the worker may stay at the place of work more than 10 hours a day, providing his stay shall not exceed 12 hours a day, published Egyptian Wakayeh / Government Bulletin Issue 161 dated 19 July 2003; taken from The Executive Decrees of the Labour Law, March 2004, The Middle East Library for Economic Services.

Name of Act

Decree 183 of 2003 organizing the employment of women at night work shifts, published Egyptian Wakayeh / Government Bulletin Issue 220 dated 27 September 2003; taken from The Executive Decrees of the Labour Law, March 2004, The Middle East Library for Economic Services.

Name of Act

Decree 213 of 2003 issuing the statute regulating the employment of irregular labour force, published in Egyptian Wakayeh / Government Bulletin Issue 227 (Supplement A) dated 5 October 2003; taken from The Executive Decrees of the Labour Law 2003, March 2004, The Middle East Library for Economic Services

Other source used

Law 126 of 2008 amending provisions of the Child Law, Official Journal Issue 24 dated 15 June 2008

LEGAL DEFINITIONS

Key terms are defined in §1 of the Labour Law 2003.
Labour Law 2003 §1

Working time/working hours

Provisional work is the work that by its nature forms part of the activity exercised by the employer, and the nature of its accomplishment necessitates a specified period, or it involves a particular work and ends with its completion.

Casual work is the work that by its nature does not form part of the activity exercised by the employer, and its accomplishment does not take more than six months.

Seasonal work is the work that is fulfilled in traditionally recognised periodical seasons.
Labour Law 2003 §1(D)-(F)

Employee/worker

A worker is any natural person working in return for a wage with and under the management or supervision of the employer. However, the following workers are not covered by the Labour Law 2003:
(A) Public servants of the state agencies, including the local government units and public authorities;
(B) Domestic service workers and the like;
(C) The employer’s family members whom he actually supports.
Labour Law 2003 §§1(A), 4

Employer

An employer is any natural or juridical person employing one or more workers in return for a wage.
Labour Law 2003 §1(B)

Night work(er)

Night is defined as the period between sunset and sunrise.
Labour Law 2003 §1(G)

Young worker

Infant/juvenile is defined as a person between the age of 14 (or past the age of elementary education) and 18 years. However, Chapter 3 of Part VI of Book 2 does not apply to infants/juveniles working in sheer agricultural labour.
Labour Law 2003 §§98, 103

NORMAL HOURS LIMITS

The Labour Law 2003 sets daily and weekly limits on normal working hours. Exceptions apply by decree.
Labour Law 2003 §80

Daily hours limit

The general daily hours limit is 8 hours of actual work, to be spread over a period not exceeding 10 hours. Exceptions apply by decree of the concerned minister.
Labour Law 2003 Chapter 1 of Part VI of Book 2

General limit

Subject to the provisions of Law No. 133 of 1961 regulating the employment of workers at industrial establishments, the worker shall not be employed in actual labour for more than 8 hours a day, not including the appropriated meal and rest hours.

The period between the start and end of working hours shall not be more than 10 hours a day.
Labour Law 2003 §§80, 82
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 8 hours
  • 2007: 8 hours

Exceptions

The maximum working hours may be reduced by decree of the concerned minister for certain labour categories, or in certain industries or workers to be determined by him.

The period between the start and end of working hours may be up to 12 hours a day for workers hired in work of intermittent nature.

The daily hours limit does not apply to authorised delegates of the employer, workers engaged in preparation and complementation tasks to be accomplished before or following the end of work, or workers assigned for guarding and cleaning.
Labour Law 2003 §§80, 82, 87
Decree 113 of 2003 determining the preparatory and complementary works to be effectuated before and after the completion of work, and the guard and clean-up works §§1-4
Decree 115 of 2003 determining the works that are intermittent by their nature and in which the worker may stay at the place of work more than 10 hours a day §1

Special categories

Domestic workers are excluded from the working hour protections. A lower limit applies to infant/juvenile workers.
Labour Law 2003 §§4, 101

» Young workers

An infant/juvenile shall not be made to work for more than 6 hours a day.
Labour Law 2003 §101
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» Domestic work

The normal hour limit provided by the Labour Code does not apply to domestic workers.
Labour Law 2003 §4

» Pregnant workers/recent birth

The daily working hours of the pregnant woman shall be decreased by at least one hour starting from the sixth month of the pregnancy.
Law 126 of 2008 amending provisions of the Child Law §70

Weekly hours limit

The weekly hours limit is 48 hours, not including the appropriated meal and rest hours. Exceptions apply by decree.
Labour Law 2003 Chapter 1 of Part VI of Book 2

General limit

Subject to the provisions of Law No. 133 of 1961 regulating the employment of workers at industrial establishments, the worker shall not be employed in actual labour for more than 48 hours a week, not including the appropriated meal and rest hours.

Law No. 133 of 1961 sets the weekly hours limit for workers in industrial establishments at 42 hours a week.
Labour Law 2003 §80
Decree 113 of 2003 determining the preparatory and complementary works to be effectuated before and after the completion of work, and the guard and clean-up works §5
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 48 hours
  • 2007: 48 hours
  • 1995: 48 hours.

Reference period(s)

The Labour Law 2003 does not contemplate the averaging of weekly working hours.

Compressed workweeks

The Labour Law 2003 does not expressly provide for compressed workweeks.
Labour Law 2003

Exceptions

The maximum working hours may be reduced by decree of the concerned minister for certain labour categories, or in certain industries or workers to be determined by him.

The weekly hours limit does not apply to authorised delegates of the employer.

Articles 80 and 82 do not apply to workers engaged in preparation and complementation tasks to be accomplished before or following the end of work, or to workers assigned for guarding and cleaning. However, such workers are still subject to a 48 hour weekly limit by virtue of Decree 113 of 2003, except for those workers employed in industrial establishments who have a maximum weekly limit of 42 hours.
Labour Law 2003 §80
Decree 113 of 2003 determining the preparatory and complementary works to be effectuated before and after the completion of work, and the guard and clean-up works §5

Special categories

Domestic workers are excluded from the working hour protections.
Labour Law 2003 §4

» Young workers

Article 101 indirectly imposes a weekly limit of 36 hours (i.e. 6 days of 6 hours) on infant/juvenile workers, other than infants/juveniles working in sheer agricultural labour.
Labour Law 2003 §§101, 103

OVERTIME WORK

The Labour Law 2003 imposes limits and minimum penalty rates on overtime work.
Labour Law 2003 §85

Criteria for overtime

Overtime may be required of workers where necessary to cope with unusual work exigencies or exceptional conditions.
Labour Law 2003 §85

General

The employer may not restrict himself by the provisions prescribed in articles 80, 81 and 82 if running the work continuously is for coping with unusual work exigencies or exceptional conditions, providing in these cases the concerned administrative quarter shall be notified with the justifications for overtime operation of work and the period required for completing the work, along with obtaining a written approval from it.
Labour Law 2003 §85

Limits on overtime hours

The Labour Law 2003 effectively limits overtime to 2 hours per day.
Labour Law 2003 §85

General limits

The actual working hours shall not exceed 10 hours per day.
Labour Law 2003 §85
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: maximum 10 hours per day (including overtime)
  • 2007: 2 hours per day
  • 1995: Maximum: 11 hours a day, including rest period and overtime, for 15 days to 2 months a year, depending on the circumstances.

Restrictions/exceptions

The maximum overtime working hours for workers engaged in preparation and complementation tasks to be accomplished before or following the end of work, and for workers assigned for guarding and cleaning, shall be determined by decree of the concerned minister.

Decree No. 113 of 2003 sets the maximum overtime hours for these workers at 12 hours per week. However, this is subject to a total working hours limit of 48 hours per week (i.e. normal and overtime hours).
Labour Law 2003 §87
Decree 113 of 2003 determining the preparatory and complementary works to be effectuated before and after the completion of work, and the guard and clean-up works §5

Compensation for overtime work

Penalty rates for overtime work are to be agreed upon in the individual or collective labour contract, but shall not be less than 35% for day working hours and 70% for night working hours.
Labour Law 2003 §85

Overtime rate(s)

The worker shall, in addition to his original wage, be entitled to a wage for the overtime hours as shall be agreed upon in the individual or collective labour contract, providing such wage shall not be less than the wage the worker is entitled to plus 35% for day working hours and 70% for night working hours.
Labour Law 2003 §85
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 35% increase (day hours) 70% increase (night hours)
  • 2007: 35% increase (day hours) 70% increase (night hours) , are granted overtime premium rates.
  • 1995: 25% premium during the day, 50% at night, 100% on weekly rest day and public holidays.

Notice of requirement to work overtime

The Labour Law 2003 does not impose specific requirements on employers with regards to notifying workers of overtime work. However, the employer must notify the concerned administrative quarter of the justifications for overtime operation of work and obtain a written approval from it.
Labour Law 2003 §§85, 86

General provisions

The employer shall place on the main gates used by the workers for entry, and also on a prominent place in the establishment, a schedule for the weekly day of rest, the working hours, the break periods determined for each worker, and all changes to be introduced in that schedule.
Labour Law 2003 §86

Special categories

Infant/juvenile workers are prohibited from overtime work. The overtime provisions do not apply to domestic workers.
Labour Law 2003 §§4, 101

Domestic work

The overtime provisions provided for by the Labour Code do not apply to domestic workers.
Labour Law 2003 §4

Young workers

Infant/juvenile workers shall not be made to work overtime hours.
Labour Law 2003 §101
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Pregnant workers/recent birth

Pregnant women may not work extra hours during pregnancy till 6 months after the date of delivery.
Law 126 of 2008 amending provisions of the Child Law §70

SCHEDULES

The Labour Law 2003 provides that working days are generally to be spread over a 10 hour period and requires the employer to post the schedule on the main gates and in a prominent place in the establishment.
Labour Law 2003 §§82, 86

General

Working hours and breaks must be organized so that the period between the start and end of the working day is not more than 10 hours.

The employer shall place on the main gates used by the workers for entry, and also on a prominent place in the establishment, a schedule for the weekly day of rest, the working hours, the break periods determined for each worker and all changes to be introduced in that schedule.
Labour Law 2003 §§82, 86

Exceptions

Workers hired in works intermittent by nature, as determined by decree of the concerned minister, shall be excepted from that provision, such that the period of their stay at the place of work shall not exceed 12 hours a day.

Article 82 does not apply to authorised delegates of the employer, workers engaged in preparation and complementation tasks to be accomplished before or following the end of work, or workers assigned for guarding and cleaning.
Labour Law 2003 §§82, 87
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REST PERIODS

The Labour Law 2003 provides for unpaid rest breaks and paid weekly rest periods.
Labour Law 2003 Chapter 1 of Part VI of Book 2

Rest breaks

The Labour Law 2003 provides for a general entitlement to at least 1 hour of unpaid rest during the course of each working day. Exceptions apply by decree.
Labour Law 2003 Chapter 1 of Part VI of Book 2

General provisions

Working hours shall include one or more rest breaks, totaling not less than one hour, for meals and rest. In determining this period, care shall be observed that the worker shall not be made to stay at work more than 5 continuous hours.
Labour Law 2003 §81
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: Working hours must include one or more rest breaks of not less than one hour, for meals and rest.
  • 2007: Working hours must include one or more rest breaks of not less than one hour, for meals and rest.
  • 1995: One or more meal and rest breaks totaling at least 1 hour. No work for more than 5 consecutive hours without a break.

Exceptions

Two categories of exceptions may be declared by decree.

The first are cases or works which shall - for technical reasons or operating conditions - unavoidably continue without a break period. Twenty-one cases have been so decreed, including:
(1) shift workers;
(2) office workers who serve for a period not exceeding 7 hours a day;
(3) transport workers;
(4) workers in medical establishments, including hospitals and pharmacies;
(5) retail workers.
(However, in these cases, the employer must permit the worker to take light drinks or food or obtain a rest period in a manner regulated by the management of the establishment, during the work.)

The second category of exceptions relate to the payment of rest breaks. These are hard or exhausting works during which the worker shall be granted break periods which shall be counted as actual working hours. Eighteen such cases have been decreed and include work with furnaces, explosives, asphalt and fertilisers. These workers are entitled to at least one hour of rest.
Labour Law 2003 §81
Decree 122 of 2003 Decree 122 of 2003 determining the cases or jobs in which work may continue without a break and the hard and exhausting works in which the workers are granted rest periods counted within the actual working hours §§1-3

Special categories

Special provisions apply to shift workers and infant/juvenile workers.

» Shift work

Workers may work without the mandated rest breaks where they work in:
(1) operations that continue without interruption in a three shift per day system; or
(2) a system of two shifts per day, provided the worker agrees in writing.
However, these workers are entitled to light drinks or foods, or to a rest period as regulated by the management of the establishment, during working hours.
Decree 122 of 2003 Decree 122 of 2003 determining the cases or jobs in which work may continue without a break and the hard and exhausting works in which the workers are granted rest periods counted within the actual working hours §§1, 2

» Young workers

Infant/juvenile workers are entitled to one or more break periods totaling not less than 1 hour rest break, and shall not be made to work for more than 4 unbroken hours.
Labour Law 2003 §101

Daily rest periods

The Labour Law 2003 does not make express provision for daily rest periods.

Weekly rest periods

The Labour Law 2003 provides for a 24 hour weekly rest period.
Labour Law 2003 Chapter 1 of Part VI of Book 2

Duration

The weekly rest period shall be not less than 24 hours.
Labour Law 2003 §83

» General

The work shall be reorganised at the establishment so that each worker shall have a weekly period of rest of not less than 24 complete hours after at most 6 continuous working days. In all cases, the weekly rest period shall be reckoned as a paid time.
Labour Law 2003 §83
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 24 consecutive hours after at most 6 continuous working days.
  • 2007: 1 day
  • 1995: 1 day.

» Exceptions

In areas lying away from urbanization centers, and at works which by nature or due to the conditions of labour therein require running the work without interruption, a worker’s weekly rest day entitlement may be accumulated for a period of up to 8 weeks and the work organisation and sanctions regulation shall determine the rules for obtaining the weekly days of rest as added together. The establishments where less than 10 workers are employed shall set the rules regulating the weekly days of rest as added together in them, according to the decisions to be issued by the establishment.
Labour Law 2003 §84

Day specified

The Labour Law 2003 does not specify a day on which the weekly rest is to be taken.

Work on weekly rest day

Work may be required on weekly rest days in exceptional circumstances and upon notification to the concerned administrative quarter. A compensatory day must be provided within the following week.
Labour Law 2003 §85

» Criteria

The employer may not restrict himself by the provisions prescribed in articles 83 and 84 if running the work continuously is for coping with unusual work exigencies or exceptional conditions, providing in these cases the concerned administrative quarter shall be notified with the justifications for overtime operation of work and the period required for completing the work, along with obtaining a written approval from it.
Labour Law 2003 §85

» Compensation (for working on a rest day)

If using the worker takes place on his day of rest, the worker shall be entitled to the equivalent of his wage for that day, and the employer shall grant him another day in lieu of that day of rest during the following week.
Labour Law 2003 §85

» Prohibitions and limitations

Young workers below the age of 18 shall not be made to work on weekly rest days.
Labour Law 2003 §101

ANNUAL LEAVE AND PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

The Labour Law 2003 provides for an entitlement of 21 days’ paid annual leave to be determined by the employer, and for a maximum of 13 days’ paid holiday to be determined by decree.
Labour Law 2003 Part IV of Book 2

ANNUAL LEAVE

The Labour Law 2003 provides for an entitlement of 21 days’ paid annual leave.
Labour Law 2003 Part IV of Book 2

Qualifying period

A worker must have spent at least 6 months in the service of the employer to be entitled to annual leave.
Labour Law 2003 §47

Duration

The annual leave entitlement is 21 days per annum, with additional entitlements for long service or arduous or remote work.
Labour Law 2003 §47

» General

The general entitlement to annual leave is 21 days for each completed year of service.
Labour Law 2003 §47
Historical data (year indicates year of data collection)
  • 2009: 21 days.
  • 1995: 21 days.

» Exceptions

Workers who have completed 10 years of service with one or more employers, and workers over the age of 50 years, shall be entitled to 30 days’ annual leave per year.

Workers engaged in hard, dangerous and unwholesome works, or who work in remote areas determined by virtue of a decree, are entitled to an additional 7 days’ annual leave.
Labour Law 2003 §47

Payment

Annual leave is to be paid, unless the worker performs work for another employer during the period.

» Amount

Annual leave is to be on full pay. However, the right to full pay while on annual leave is contingent on the worker not performing work with another employer during the leave.
Labour Law 2003 §§47, 51

» Date of payment

Date of payment is not prescribed by the Labour Law 2003.
Labour Law 2003

Schedule and splitting

The employer shall determine the dates of the annual leave according to work exigencies and conditions. In all cases, the worker shall obtain an annual leave of 15 days, including at least 6 continuous days, and the employer shall settle the balance of leaves or the wage computed against that balance at most every 3 years.

The worker shall go on leave on the date and for the period determined by the employer. If the worker refuses in writing to go on leave he shall forfeit his right to collecting their equivalent in wage terms. The only circumstances in which a worker shall have the right to determine the date of his annual leave are:
(a) if he is sitting for the exam in any of the educational stages, and notifies the employer at least 15 days before he goes on leave; and
(b) where the worker abstains from work for a casual reason. A worker may so abstain from work for a maximum of 6 days per year and a period of 2 days at a time. The casual leave shall be counted as part of the annual leave determined for the worker.
Labour Law 2003 §§48, 49, 51

Work during annual leave

The employer shall not interrupt the annual leave except for strong reasons necessitated by work interest.

Where a worker performs work for a second employer during a period of annual leave from his first employer, the first employer shall have to deprive the worker of his wage for the leave period, or retrieve the wage he has paid for it, without prejudice to the disciplinary sanction.
Labour Law 2003 §§48, 50

Special categories

Domestic workers are not entitled to annual leave. Special requirements apply to the scheduling of annual leave for young workers.

» Young workers

The leave may not be divided, joined or postponed with regard to juveniles (under 18 years of age).
Labour Law 2003 §48

» Domestic work

The provisions of the Labour Code do not apply to domestic workers.
Labour Law 2003 §4

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

The worker shall have the right to a leave with full pay on the holidays to be determined by a decree of the concerned minister, with a maximum limit of 13 days per year.
Labour Law 2003 §52

Number and dates

The public holidays are as follows:
(1) the first day of the month of Moharam (the Hejira New Year);
(2) the twelfth day of Rabi’e I (the Prophet’s Birthday);
(3)-(4) the first and second days of the month of Shawal (Lesser Bairam);
(5)-(7) the ninth, tenth and eleventh days of the month of Zul Hejah (Pre-Greater Bairam Day "Arafat Day," and the first and second days of the Bairam);
(8) the seventh day of the month of January (Christmas Holiday);
(9) Sham El Nessim Day;
(10) the twenty-fifth day of the month of April (Sinai Liberation Day);
(11) the first day of the month of May (Labour Day);
(12) the twenty-third day of the month of July (Revolution Day);
(13) the sixth day of the month of October (Armed Forces Day).
Labour Law 2003 §52
Decree 112 of 2003 to determine the holidays considered a leave with full pay for workers §1

Payment

The worker shall have the right to leave with full pay on the holidays determined by decree.
Labour Law 2003 §52

Work on Public Holidays


» Criteria

The employer may require the worker to attend to work on holidays if so necessitated by work conditions. However, infant/juvenile workers shall not be required to come to work on holidays.
Labour Law 2003 §§52, 101
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» Compensation

If required to work on a public holiday, the worker shall be entitled, in addition to his wage for that day, to double that wage.
Labour Law 2003 §52

EMERGENCY FAMILY LEAVE

A worker may abstain from work for a casual reason for a period not exceeding 6 days during the year, with a maximum limit of 2 days each time. The casual leave shall be counted as part of the annual leave determined for the worker.
Labour Law 2003 §51

PART-TIME WORK

The Labour Law 2003 does not expressly provide for part-time work arrangements.
Labour Law 2003

NIGHT WORK

Higher penalty rates apply for overtime performed at night and night work by women is restricted. Infant/juvenile workers are prohibited from working at night.
Labour Law 2003 §§85, 89, 101
Decree 183 of 2003 organizing the employment of women at night work shifts

Compensation

The rate of pay for overtime performed during night working hours shall be agreed upon in the individual or collective labour contract, providing such wage shall not be less than the wage the worker is entitled to plus 70%.
Labour Law 2003 §85
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Special categories

Restrictions apply on women being required to work during the period between 7pm and 7am. Infant/juvenile workers are prohibited from working at night.
Labour Law 2003 §§89, 101
Decree 183 of 2003 organizing the employment of women at night work shifts

Young workers

Infant/juvenile workers shall not be made to work between 7pm and 7am.
Labour Law 2003 §101
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Women

Subject to the provisions of the international conventions subscribed to, women may not be employed at night work shifts in any industrial establishment during the period between 7pm and 7am.

In cases where women are employed at night work shifts, the employer shall provide all guarantees of protection, care, transportation and security for the female workers, providing this license for employing them at the night shifts shall be issued from the Manpower and Emigration Directorate, after ascertaining that all aforementioned guarantees and conditions are properly provided.

These rules do not apply to women who occupy administrative supervisory or technical positions, or in force majeur cases if work in a certain institution is discontinued for an unforeseeable reason that by nature does recur, or whenever the work is necessary for maintaining primary materials, or substances in preparation, from realised damage.
Decree 183 of 2003 organizing the employment of women at night work shifts §§1, 3, 4, 5

SHIFT WORK

Shift workers are not entitled to rest breaks as prescribed by §81 of the Labour Law.
Labour Law 2003 §81
Decree 122 of 2003 Decree 122 of 2003 determining the cases or jobs in which work may continue without a break and the hard and exhausting works in which the workers are granted rest periods counted within the actual working hours §§1, 2

Rest breaks

Works in which operation continues without interruption with the alternation of workers and work in the system of 3 shifts daily, and works in which the system of 2 shifts is carried out daily (provided the workers’ approval is secured in writing), shall continue without rest period. However, the employer must authorise the worker to have light drinks or foods, or obtain a rest period in a manner regulated by the management of the establishment, during the work.
Decree 122 of 2003 Decree 122 of 2003 determining the cases or jobs in which work may continue without a break and the hard and exhausting works in which the workers are granted rest periods counted within the actual working hours §§1, 2

ON-CALL WORK

No provisions dealing with on-call work identified.

FLEXITIME

No provision for flexitime identified.

CASUAL WORK

Casual work is defined as work that by its nature does not form part of the activity exercised by the employer, and its accomplishment does not take more than six months. However, the Labour Law 2003 does not make specific provision for casual working time.
Labour Law 2003 §1
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SHORT-TIME WORK/WORK-SHARING

Short-time or work-sharing arrangements may be one of many cost-saving initiatives instigated by the employer where he would otherwise have the right to terminate a worker’s employment for economic reasons.
Labour Law 2003 §201

General provisions

In specified cases where the employer has the right to terminate the labour contract for economic reasons, he may - instead of using that right - modify the conditions of the contract temporarily. He may in particular charge the worker with performing a work not agreed upon, even if it differs from his original work. He may also reduce the wage of the worker up to not less than the minimum wages.
Labour Law 2003 §201

RIGHT TO CHANGE WORKING HOURS

The Labour Law 2003 does not establish a right for workers to change working hours.

INFORMATION & CONSULTATION

The employer must post the schedule of working and rest hours. No requirement to consult workers about working hours identified.
Labour Law 2003

Information

The employer shall place on the main gates used by the workers for entry, and also on a prominent place in the establishment, a schedule for the weekly day of rest, the working hours, the break periods determined for each worker and all changes to be introduced in that schedule.
Labour Law 2003 §86

Results generated on: 24th April 2014 at 22:51:50.
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