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Textile industry - 7 entries found

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  • Textile industry

2011

CIS 12-0120 Kayumba A., Moen B.E., Brċtveit M., Eduard W., Mashalla Y.
Reduced lung function among sisal processors
The objective of this study was to examine lung function and chronic respiratory symptoms among sisal workers in Tanzania and compare the results with a control group. A cross-sectional study on chronic respiratory symptoms and lung function was conducted in 2006 among male Tanzanian sisal processing workers from six sisal estates. Participants included 86 workers in decortication departments, 68 workers in brushing departments and 30 low exposed security guards. The response rate was 97%. Chronic respiratory symptoms and background information were obtained by structured interview. Forced ventilatory capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) were estimated before and after a work shift, and FEV1/FVC ratio calculated. Chronic cough and chest tightness were experienced by 38% and 68% of workers in brushing departments, 20% and 6% of workers in decortication and 7% and 0% of security workers, respectively. A reduced FEV1/FVC ratio related to years of work was found among workers in brushing departments when adjusting for age, smoking, previous respiratory illnesses and body mass index, using regression analyses. Work in decortication departments was not related to reduced lung function parameters. The prevalence of FEV1/FVC<70 was above 50 for all three groups. Lung function parameters were similar before and after work shifts, except that peak expiratory flow increased among workers in brushing departments after work shifts. The results indicate a relationship between work in sisal brushing departments and the development of obstructive lung disorders.
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sep. 2011, Vol.68, No.9, p.682-685. 13 ref.
Reduced_lung_function_[BUY_THIS_ARTICLE] [in English]

CIS 11-0811 Öztürk N., Esin M.N.
Investigation of musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic risk factors among female sewing machine operators in Turkey
This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic risks in female sewing machine operators at a textile company. The study sample comprised all 283 female sewing machine operators employed in the company. Data were collected through the use of the adapted Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and by direct observations via the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) to determine ergonomic risks. RULA is a validated tool for assessment of ergonomic risks. The mean age of the women was 30.2 and the mean number of years of employment was 13.4. The highest prevalence rates for musculoskeletal symptoms were in the trunk (62.5%), neck (50.5%) and shoulder (50.2%); 65% of the women had experienced musculoskeletal pain or discomfort over the previous six months. Pain intensity of these symptoms assessed with a visual analogue scale was found to be 3.5. Results of the RULA scores were found to be high (average of 6.9, with all scores >5). Implications of these findings are discussed.
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 2011, Vol.41, p.585-591. 38 ref.

CIS 11-0672 Öztürk N., Esin M.N.
Investigation of musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic risk factors among female sewing machine operators in Turkey
This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic risks in female sewing machine operators at a textile company. The sample included 283 sewing machine operators, of mean age 30.2 years. Data were collected by means of an adapted Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and by direct observations via the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) to determine ergonomic risks. Women have both a high level of musculoskeletal disorders and high ergonomic risks. "Feeling pressured because of work" was the strongest predictor. Other findings are discussed.
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 2011, Vol.41, p.585-591. 38 ref.
Investigation_of_musculoskeletal_symptoms.pdf [in English]

2010

CIS 11-0512 Fishwick D., Barraclough R., Pickering T., Fletcher A., Lewis R., Niven R., Warburton C.J.
Comparison of various airflow measurements in symptomatic textile workers
The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between work-related respiratory symptoms, airway reactivity, across-shift change in forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) and work-related changes in serial peak expiratory flow (sPEF) measures in a group of textile workers. Fifty-three workers, 34 exposed to cotton dust and 19 to man-made fibres (MMFs), were investigated using a standard respiratory questionnaire, sPEF, across-shift FEV1) measurement and airway responsiveness. Nine workers (17%) had a >5% across-shift fall in FEV1 and these falls were associated with the presence of work-related symptoms. Seven workers had a positive sPEF chart as judged by the software analysis (OASYS), although there was no relationship between work-related symptoms and sPEF. Six cotton workers (18%) and one MMF worker (5%) had airway hyperreactivity, which was associated strongly with work-related symptoms. Five of the seven subjects with a positive sPEF had airway hyperreactivity compared with 12 of 46 with a negative sPEF. Implications of these findings are discussed.
Occupational Medicine, 2010, Vol.60, p.631-634. 17 ref.

CIS 11-0213 Wong E.Y., Ray R., Gao D.L., Wernli K.J., Li W., Fitzgibbons E.D., Camp J.E., Heagerty P.J., De Roos A.J., Holt V.L., Thomas D.B., Checkoway H.
Physical activity, physical exertion, and miscarriage risk in women textile workers in Shanghai, China
Strenuous occupational physical activity and physical demands may be risk factors for adverse reproductive outcomes. This retrospective study in the Shanghai, China, textile industry collected women's self-reported reproductive history. Occupational physical activity was assessed from an industry-specific job-exposure matrix. Data were subjected to multivariate logistic regression analyses. Compared with women employed in sedentary jobs, a reduced risk of miscarriage was found for women working in jobs with either light (odds ratio (OR) 0.18) or medium (OR 0.24) physical activity during the first pregnancy and over all pregnancies (light OR 0.32; medium OR 0.43). However frequent crouching was associated with elevated risks (OR 1.82).
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 2010, Vol.53, p.497-505. 31 ref.

CIS 11-0186 Wang P.C., Harrison R.J., Yu F., Rempel D.M., Ritz B.R.
Follow-up of neck and shoulder pain among sewing machine operators: The Los Angeles Garment Study
The aim of this study was to explore factors affecting or modifying self-reported neck/shoulder pain in 247 sewing machine operators who participated in a 4-month prospective intervention study for musculoskeletal disorders. All participants were immigrants. The influence of individual and work-related factors on changes in neck/shoulder pain were examined during follow-up using linear mixed models with time-spline functions. A dramatic decline (72%) in self-reported pain intensity was observed in the first month of follow-up, followed by a small increase from the first to fourth month (4% per month). Workers who perceived and reported their physical workload as high or who worked overtime experienced less overall pain reduction. Higher baseline pain intensity, being of Hispanic ethnicity (as opposed to Asian), and taking cumulative daily rest time during work of 35 min or more allowing for muscles to rest were associated with a larger pain reduction in the first month, but not thereafter. Findings indicate that some work-related factors may be of clinical relevance for reducing neck/shoulder pain. Having lower physical workloads and less overtime work should be considered when treating patients or planning workplace interventions for managing work-related musculoskeletal disorders in this underserved immigrant population.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 2010, Vol.53, p.352-360. Illus. 27 ref.

CIS 10-0163 Nag A., Vyas H., Nag P.K.
Gender differences, work stressors and musculoskeletal disorders in weaving industries
This study was undertaken to identify the work stressors among male and female weavers in the powerloom and handloom sectors and to examine the association of work stressors with the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). It involved 516 workers. There was a high overall prevalence of MSDs, with women more prone to developing MSDs in upper back and lower back, while men were more prone to developing pain in the knee and hand. Multivariate analysis indicated that a job duration of over ten years, manual material handling and poor machinery safety were significant risk factors of MSDs in the powerloom sector. Among handloom weavers, significant risk factors of pain included being aged over 25 years, poor machinery design, mental overload and skill requirements.
Industrial Health, May 2010, Vol.48, No.3, p.339-348. Illus. 32 ref.