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Young workers - 29 entries found

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CIS 10-0184 Guide to inspecting workplace
This guide consists of a series of checklists for workplace inspections involving the following activities and exposures: chemicals and harmful substances; electricity; manual tasks; slips and trips; working at heights; forklifts; new and young workers; machinery and plant; machinery guarding; noise; emergency procedures; violence and aggression; working alone.
Commission for occupational safety and health, 1260 Hay Street, PO Box 294, West Perth, WA 6872, Australia, no date. PDF document, 21p.
http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/WorkSafe/PDF/Hazard_identification/priority_area_checklist.pdf [in English]

CIS 12-0077 Laberge L., Ledoux E., Thuilier C., Gaudreault M., Martin J.S., Cloutier E., Auclair J., Lachance L., Veillette S., Rozon C., Gaudreault M., Arbour N., Bescou S., Agenais T., Hostiou L.
Effects of cumulative work activities and constraints on the OHS of young student workers
Santé et sécurité des étudiants qui occupent un emploi durant l'année scolaire - Les effets du cumul d'activités et de contraintes de travail [in French]
This study examined the effects of cumulative work activities and constraints on the health and safety of 94 young persons aged 19 to 21 in a region of Quebec, Canada. Devoting an average of 46 hours per week to work and studies, the majority of students do not find this load too high, even though one in five considers the work as being difficult, demanding and stressful. Half report sleep disturbances. The majority work in the services sector where they are exposed to many organizational constraints, including tense situations with the public. Working in a standing posture for the most part, half of them handling heavy loads, they feel leg or foot pain, or have to deal with musculoskeletal pain. Two girls out of five and almost one boy in five declare experiencing general fatigue requiring a medical consultation. Other findings are discussed.
Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail du Québec (IRSST), 505 boul. de Maisonneuve Ouest, Montreal (Quebec) H3A 3C2, Canada, 2011. xi, 131p. Illus. Approx. 200 ref.
Santé_et_sécurité_des_étudiants_[INTERNET_FREE_ACCESS] [in French]

CIS 11-0821 Ravallec C., Brasseur G., Lemarié J.
Seasonal work - Remaining alert to safety while on vacation
Travail saisonnier - La sécurité en éveil pendant les vacances [in French]
Topics addressed in this collection of articles on occupational hazards related to seasonal work and their prevention: responsibilities of employers; legal aspects; agricultural seasonal workers; consciousness-raising comic album aimed at workers in hospitality and catering; work-sharing system developed by a group of employers in a tourist region of France; management of seasonal workers at an aquatic park; practical cases (aquatic park, pleasure boats, manufacture of blinds, luxury hotel).
Travail et sécurité, July-Aug. 2011, No.719, p.18-33. Illus. 4 ref.
Travail_saisonnier.pdf [in French]

CIS 11-0669 Heinrich S., Peters A., Kellberger J., Ellenberg D., Genuneit J., Nowak D., Vogelberg C., von Mutius E., Weinmayr G., Radon K.
Study on occupational allergy risks (SOLAR II) in Germany: Design and methods
SOLAR II is the 2nd follow-up of a population-based cohort recruited in Munich and Dresden in 1995/6. A first follow-up study was conducted 2002 and 2003 (SOLAR I). The aims of SOLAR II were to investigate the course of atopic diseases over puberty taking environmental and occupational risk factors into account. This article describes the methods of the 2nd follow-up carried out from 2007 to 2009 and the challenges faced while studying a population-based cohort of young adults. Wherever possible, the same questionnaire instruments were used throughout the studies. They included questions on respiratory and allergic diseases, domestic and occupational exposure and work related stress. Furthermore, clinical examinations including skin prick tests, spirometry and bronchial challenge with methacholine, exhaled nitric oxide and blood samples were employed at baseline and 2nd follow-up. Of the 3053 SOLAR I study participants who had agreed to be contacted again, about 50% had moved in the meantime and had to be traced using phone directories and the German population registries. Overall, 2904 of these participants could be contacted on average five years after the first follow-up. From this group, 2051 subjects (71%) completed the questionnaire they received via mail. Of these, 57% participated at least in some parts of the clinical examinations. Challenges faced included the high mobility of this age group. Time constraints and limited interest in the study were substantial. Analysing the results, selection bias had to be considered as questionnaire responders (54%) and those participating in the clinical part of the study (63%) were more likely to have a high parental level of education compared to non-participants (42%). Similarly, a higher prevalence of parental atopy (such as allergic rhinitis) at baseline was found for participants in the questionnaire part (22%) and those participating in the clinical part of the study (27%) compared to non-participants (11%).
Public Health, 2011, Vol.11, No.298, 11 p. (Internet document).
Study_on_occupational_allergy_risks.pdf [in English]

CIS 11-0615 Temporary workers and the McBride safety policy
Travailleurs intérimaires et politique de sécurité chez McBride [in French]
Presentation of the safety and health programme adopted by a Belgian manufacturer of cleaning and personal care products, aimed at temporary workers, in particular young workers and students.
Prevent Focus, Apr. 2011, p.7-9. Illus.

CIS 11-0356 Bohadana A.B., Hannhart B., Ghezzo H., Teculescu D., Zmirou-Navier D.
Exhaled nitric oxide and spirometry in respiratory health surveillance
Exposure to pollutants in bakeries and hairdressing salons can cause airway syndromes varying from bronchial irritation to asthma. Workplace respiratory health surveillance aims to identify possible cases requiring further investigation. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) and spirometry for health surveillance of apprentice bakers (ABs) and apprentice hairdressers (AHDs). Determinants of FE(NO) were also identified. Symptoms and physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated by questionnaire. FE(NO) was measured and spirometry was carried out. Subjects with elevated FE(NO), airway obstruction (one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) < 95th percentile) and atopy were identified. A total of 126 apprentices (59 ABs and 67 AHDs) participated. Twenty-nine (23%) apprentices had abnormal tests: four had associated high FE(NO) and airway obstruction, while 25 had either high FE(NO) or airway obstruction alone. Compared with ABs, AHDs had more asthma (38% versus 0%) and atopy (62% versus 6%). There was no difference in symptoms, smoking FE(NO) or airways obstruction. Among 97 subjects with normal tests, no differences were found between ABs and AHDs. Average FE(NO) was increased in atopic non-smokers compared with atopic smokers and non-atopic subjects. Smoking, a history of allergies, FEV1/FVC and respiratory symptoms were the main determinants of FE(NO).
Occupational Medicine, 2011, Vol.61, p.108-114. Illus. 30 ref.

CIS 11-0376 Breslin F.C., Morassaei S., Wood M., Mustard C.A.
Assessing occupational health and safety of young workers who use youth employment centers
Adolescents and young adults are at elevated risk for a work injury. To obtain more information on this "high risk" group of young workers, young people at youth employment centers across Ontario were asked through an online survey about training, unsafe work conditions, work injuries and safety knowledge. The 1,886 youth who completed the survey reported a medically-attended work injury rate of 14.45 per 100 full-time equivalents. The most common unsafe work conditions were dust, trip hazards and heavy lifting. In addition, many young workers reported using much of their income for living essentials (e.g., rent). This suggests that prevention efforts should target this vulnerable subgroup. Implications of these findings are discussed.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 2011, Vol.54, p.325-337. Illus. 21 ref.

CIS 10-0820 Rasmussen K., Hansen C.D., Nielsen K.J., Andersen J.H.
Incidence of work injuries amongst Danish adolescents and their association with work environment factors
The objective of this study was to examine the incidence of work accidents among Danish adolescents that required medical attention and to identify possible work environment factors associated with such accidents. Information was collected by means of questionnaires from a birth cohort comprising all 3687 adolescents born in 1989 living in a region of Denmark. The questionnaires contained items on self-reported number of accidents, the number of working hours and work environment factors. Approximately 5% of the adolescents who held a job had experienced a work injury at the age of 17. This equals an incidence of 65 accidents per million working hours. Most adolescents had decent working conditions, although nearly half reported that their work was heavy, monotonous or psychologically demanding. Heavy work, high psychological demands and low social support increased the risk of experiencing work injuries after adjustment for a number of factors.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 2011, Vol.54, p.143-152. 28 ref.

CIS 10-0814 Rasmussen K., Hansen C.D., Nielsen K.J., Andersen J.H.
Incidence of work injuries amongst Danish adolescents and their associations with work environment factors
The objective was to examine the incidence of work accidents that required medical attention among Danish adolescents and to identify possible work environment factors associated with such accidents. Data were collected through two questionnaire rounds (2004 and 2007) from a birth cohort comprising all 3687 adolescents born in 1989 living in a region of Denmark. The questionnaire contained items on self-reported number of accidents, the number of working hours and work environment factors. Approximately 5% of the adolescents who held a job experienced a work injury at the age of 17. This equals an incidence of 65 accidents per million working hours. Most adolescents had decent working conditions, although nearly half reported that their work was heavy, monotonous or psychologically demanding. Heavy work, high psychological demands and low social support increased the risk of experiencing work injuries after adjustment for a number of factors.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 2011, Vol.54, p.143-152. 28 ref.

2010

CIS 12-0213
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Occupational injuries and deaths among younger workers - United States, 1998-2007
Younger workers (defined as those aged 15-24 years) represent 14% of the United States labor force and face high risk for injury while on the job. To assess trends and help guide efforts to improve young worker safety, CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) analyzed data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) and the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System occupational supplement (NEISS-Work) for the period 1998-2007. This report summarizes the results of that analysis.
Journal of the American Medical Association, July 2010, Vol.304, No.1, Illus. p.33-35. 10 ref.
Occupational_injuries_[INTERNET_FREE_ACCESS] [in English]

CIS 11-0384 Carothers R., Breslin F.C., Denomy J., Foad M.
Promoting occupational safety and health for working children through microfinance programming
Microfinance programmes are recognized as a way of improving incomes and creating employment for large numbers of low-income families, but there are concerns that working conditions within these informal microenterprises are far from ideal. For example, when families receive loans to expand a microenterprise, children may make up the labour shortfall until the family can afford to hire adult workers. Through the Promoting and Protecting the Interests of Children who Work (PPIC-Work) project being carried out in Egypt, a set of interventions that can not only improve working conditions, but can also be integrated into standard microfinance programs has been developed. By working with and through self-financing microfinance programs, the PPIC-Work approach provides a way of improving occupational safety and health not only for children working in microenterprises but also for large numbers of children and adults working in the informal sector more generally.
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, 2010, Vol.16, p.180-190. Illus. 28 ref.
Promoting.pdf [in English]

CIS 11-0383 Miller M.E, eds.
Child labor and protecting young workers around the world - An introduction to this issue
According to the International Labour Organization, more than 218 million children in the world today are involved in child labour, often doing work that is damaging to their mental, physical and emotional development. At least 126 million children are performing hazardous work. For many decades, children have been recognized as a vulnerable population in need of and deserving special protections, as reflected in international conventions and national laws. This special issue of the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health presents research on child and adolescent labour around the world, focusing on studies that evaluate health effects from exposures at work, programmatic interventions to reduce work exposures or limit hazardous work activities, and policy mechanisms to reduce the negative health impacts from working too many hours, night hours, or in settings that are too dangerous and inappropriate for youth under age 18. The issue also includes a resource list and photographs of children at work.
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, 2010, Vol.16, p.103-112. 39 ref.
Child_labor.pdf [in English]

CIS 11-0265 Duke J., Guest M., Boggess M.
Age-related safety in professional heavy vehicle drivers: A literature review
With Australia facing a looming shortage of heavy vehicle drivers, the question is raised as to whether it is desirable or prudent to encourage older professional heavy vehicle drivers to remain in the transport sector for longer, or to recruit drivers of a younger age. A limited number of studies reported age-specific accident rates for heavy vehicles for the spectrum of driver age that included drivers younger than 27 years and those over 60 years of age. Heavy vehicle drivers younger than 27 years of age demonstrated higher rates of accident/fatality involvement which decline and plateau until the age of 63 years where increased rates were again observed. Other contributing factors to heavy vehicle accidents include long hours and subsequent sleepiness and fatigue, employer safety culture, vehicle configuration, urbanization and road classification.
Accident Analysis and Prevention, Mar. 2010, Vol.42, No.2, p.364-371. 53 ref.

CIS 10-0817 Walters J.K., Christensen K.A., Green M.K., Karam L.E., Kincl L.D.
Occupational injuries to Oregon workers 24 years and younger: An analysis of workers' compensation claims, 2000-2007
The objective of this study was to describe and estimate rates of occupational injuries to workers younger than 25 years of age in Oregon during an 8-year period. Oregon workers' compensation disabling claims data and one commercial insurance carrier's non-disabling claims data were analyzed. Injuries were more frequent among 22-24 year olds and among males, though females accounted for a higher proportion of claims in the youngest age group. The most common injury type was a sprain or strain, but lacerations and burns were more frequently reported in the 14-18 year olds. When non-disabling claims were included, the rate of injury for 14-18 year olds doubled. The overall rate of injury was 122.7/10,000 workers, but was higher in the construction, manufacturing and transportation sectors, and in the agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting sector for older teens and young adults.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 2010, Vol.53, No.10, p.984-994. Illus. 52 ref.

CIS 10-0611 Code of practice on preventing accidents to children and young persons in agriculture
Because farms are homes as well as workplaces, there are frequently children and young persons in this high-risk environment, either in the family or as visitors. This means children and young persons are at risk of death or injury on farms. This Code of Practice applies only to on-farm work activities and their potential impact on children and young persons. Contents: introduction; definition of a young person; scope of the code of practice; safety statements and risk assessments; play areas for children not involved in work activities; operating tractors; operating machinery; riding on tractors and machinery; contact with machinery and moving vehicles; downing and asphyxiation; falls from heights; falling objects; contact with animals; hazardous substances; fire; conclusion. Appendices include extracts from and comments on key legislation.
Health and Safety Authority, The Metropolitan Building, James Joyce Street, Dublin 1, Ireland, 2010. 30p. Illus.
HSA0347.pdf [in English]

CIS 10-0606 Ravallec C., Ginibrière G., Vaudoux D.
New hires - A group of employees that needs to be trained and informed
Nouveaux embauchés - Une population à former et informer [in French]
Topics addressed in this collection of articles on occupational hazards facing new employees: role of mentors; induction programme of a construction enterprise having the support of a regional health insurance institution; interview of a regional manager of a construction industry employers' federation on the importance of training mentors; examples of induction training in two large enterprises (an airline and a construction company); safety training of new hires in a construction company; safety training during apprenticeship.
Travail et sécurité, Sep. 2010, No. 709, p. 20-31. Illus. 7 ref.
Nouveaux_embauchés.pdf [in French]

CIS 10-0405 Kaskutas V., Dale A.M., Lipscomb H., Gaal J., Fuchs M., Evanoff B.
Fall prevention among apprentice carpenters
Falls from heights are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the construction industry, especially among inexperienced workers. Apprentice carpenters were studied to identify individual and organizational factors associated with falls from heights, using a 72-item questionnaire on fall prevention with multiple domains including fall experience, fall-prevention knowledge, risk perceptions, confidence in ability to prevent falls, training experience, and perceptions of the safety climate and crew safety behaviors. Of the 1025 respondents of the cross-sectional sample, 51% knew of someone having fallen from a height at work and 16% had personally fallen in the past year, with ladders accounting for most of the falls. Despite participation in school-based and on-the-job training, fall-prevention knowledge was poor. Ladders were perceived as low risk and ladder training was rare. Apprentices reported high levels of unsafe, fall-related behaviors on their work crews. Apprentices in residential construction were more likely to fall than those in commercial construction, as were apprentices working on crews with fewer senior carpenters to provide mentorship, and those reporting more unsafe behaviors among fellow workers.
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, May 2010, Vol.36, No.3, p.258-265. Illus. 27 ref.

CIS 10-0363 Chin P., DeLuca C., Poth C., Chadwick I., Hutchinson N., Munby H.
Enabling youth to advocate for workplace safety
Work-related injury rates for Canadian youth (ages 15-24) are alarmingly high compared to adult workers even though youth are less likely to be performing hazardous jobs. This paper reports on a document analysis of youth workplace safety education initiatives sponsored by national and provincial/territorial governmental and non-governmental agencies. Web-based documents were analyzed through the theoretical lens of self-advocacy. The self-advocacy framework highlights how youth can be agentic in altering high-risk workplaces by publicly articulating their own interests, needs, and rights; thus, self-advocacy is a critical component in studying educational programs for youth safety. The analysis revealed that instruction on workplace safety identifies safety issues to workers and tells youth to work safely but does little to promote self-advocacy in young workers.
Safety Science, June 2010, Vol.48, No.5, p.570-579. 32 ref.

2009

CIS 11-0177 Gender equality at the heart of decent work
L'égalité entre hommes et femmes au cœur du travail décent [in French]
This report was compiled for the delegates attending the 98th International Labour Conference held in Geneva, Switzerland, from 3 to 19 June 2009. The campaign entitled "Gender equality at the heart of decent work" is built around 12 topics related to decent work, some having a direct bearing on occupational safety and health: working during pregnancy; child labour; young workers; social protection of women; older workers.
ILO Publications, International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 2009. xii, 262p. Illus.
Rapport VI/FR.pdf [in French]
Rapport VI/EN.pdf [in English]

CIS 10-0775 Gaudin J.F., Laplante B., Ledoux E., Vultur M., Tsala Dimbuene Z.
Exploratory study of the relationship between job mobility and the initial incidence of injuries among young persons aged from 16 to 24 years
Etude exploratoire des parcours d'emploi en lien avec l'apparition des premières lésions chez les jeunes de 16 à 24 ans [in French]
The objective of this study was to better document the dynamics of job mobility and OSH among young workers from 16 to 24 years of age, in the context of a longitudinal survey (Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics) carried out by Statistics Canada. The results show that job mobility is strongly associated with the risk of occupational injuries and that this varies with age. Consequently, the total risk of suffering an occupational injury is higher for workers under 25 years of age than for older workers. Finally, in general, the variables related to employment and work organization are factors that can increase the risk of an occupational injury or not, which varies with the workers' age and gender.
Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail du Québec (IRSST), 505 boul. de Maisonneuve Ouest, Montreal (Quebec) H3A 3C2, Canada, 2009. iv, 74p. Illus. 68 ref. Price: CAD 12.60. Downloadable version (PDF format) free of charge.
Rapport_R-630.pdf [in French]

CIS 10-0440 Kotowski S.E., Davis K.G., Waters T.R.
Investigation of select ergonomic interventions for farm youth. Part 1: Shovels; Part 2: Wheelbarrows
The objective of this study was to investigate alternative shovel and wheelbarrow designs as an intervention for youth working to transfer material on the farm with respect to trunk motion and perceived exertion. A lumbar motion monitor was used to capture three-dimensional trunk kinematics during a simulated shoveling and wheelbarrow tasks. Ratings of perceived exertion and comfort of use were also assessed. Results indicated that shovel add-on handles decreased sagittal flexion but increased twisting compared to ordinary shovels. For wheelbarrows, a reduction in the sagittal trunk flexion and velocity was achieved by adding a push bar to the handles, in combination with three-wheels, or utilizing adjustable handles. However, these alterations had little impact on the predicted low back disorder risk levels. Additionally, the youths' perceptions of risk and exertion levels were greater for these alternative shovels and wheelbarrows than for the regular designs. Implications of these findings are discussed.
Journal of Agromedicine, 1st quarter 2009, Vol.14, No.1, p.33-43. Illus. 26 ref. (Part 1); p.44-57. Illus. 12 ref. (Part 2).

CIS 10-0358 Chapman L.J., Taveira A.D., Karsh B.T., Josefsson K.G., Newenhouse A.C., Meyer R.H.
Work exposures, injuries, and musculoskeletal discomfort among children and adolescents in dairy farming
The objective of this study was to investigate work performed by children and adolescents on dairy farm operations. Mail questionnaires were addressed to a community-based, age- and operation size-stratified sample of 240 individuals aged six to eighteen who worked on dairy operations in Wisconsin. Data were collected in 1999. The 197 children and adolescents reported averaging 567 hours of dairy farm work in the last year (10.9 hours/week) and completed over 1/3 of all calf feeding, 1/5 of the milking, 1/5 of cow feeding and 1/10 of tractor operation hours on their farm during the weeks they worked. Some of these young workers reported accomplishing duties also judged by some experts as hazardous work, including nearly half of the 9- to 11-year-olds driving tractors. Six nonfatal injuries were reported that required stopping work (14.6 per 100 full time equivalents per year), including those that required medical attention. Musculoskeletal discomfort and disability reports were unremarkable compared to existing studies of general and working populations. Wisconsin dairy farm youth appeared to be working no more hours per week than their peers in other studies of agricultural populations. However the exposures of very young workers to hazardous tractor driving and tower silo tasks suggest that there is an urgent need for improved and validated interventions to reduce these exposures.
Journal of Agromedicine, 1st quarter 2009, Vol.14, No.1, p.9-21. 51 ref.

2008

CIS 10-0178 Occupational safety and health in the Republic of Uzbekistan - National profile
Охрана труда в Республике Узбекистан. - Национальный обзор. [in Russian]
This report reviews the current situation regarding occupational safety and health (OSH) in the Republic of Uzbekistan. Contents: legal framework of the OSH system; mechanisms of national policy revision; coordination and cooperation; practical means and instruments for implementing OSH policies; statistics of occupational accidents and diseases; employer and employee policy and programme; routine and current OSH activities; general information on the country; other relevant information; elements to be included in the analysis of the situation.
ILO Publications, International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 2008. 48p. Illus. (en); 53p. Illus. (ru).
http://www.ilo.org/public/english/region/eurpro/moscow/areas/safety/docs/uz_ohsprof2_en.pdf [in English]
http://www.ilo.org/public/english/region/eurpro/moscow/areas/safety/docs/uz_ohsprof2_en.pdf [in Russian]

CIS 10-0177 Occupational safety and health in the Republic of Tajikistan - National profile
Охрана труда в Республике Таджикистан. - Национальный обзор. [in Russian]
This report reviews the current situation regarding occupational safety and health (OSH) in the Republic of Tajikistan. Contents: legal framework of the OSH system; technical documentation; mechanisms of the formation of the national OSH policy; social partnership and coordination mechanisms; organization of the OSH system; statistics on occupational accidents and diseases; regular measures and routine work in the field of OSH; elements to be included in the analysis of the national OSH management system; general information on the country.
ILO Publications, International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 2008. 47p. (en); 52p. (ru).
http://www.ilo.org/public/english/region/eurpro/moscow/areas/safety/docs/tj_oshprof.pdf [in English]
http://www.ilo.org/public/russian/region/eurpro/moscow/areas/safety/docs/tj_oshprof_ru.pdf [in Russian]

CIS 10-0176 Occupational safety and health in the Kyrgyz Republic - National profile
Охрана труда в Кыргызской Республике. - Национальный обзор [in Russian]
This report reviews the current situation regarding occupational safety and health (OSH) in the Kyrgyz Republic. Contents: legal framework of the OSH system; technical documentation; mechanisms of the formation of the national OSH policy; social partnership and coordination mechanisms; organization of the OSH system; statistics of occupational accidents and diseases; regular measures and routine work in the field of occupational safety; strength and weaknesses of the national OSH management system; general conclusions from the national profile; information resources (regulations, agreements, Internet, journals and other resources); methods for assessing statistical indicators; general information on the country.
ILO Publications, International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 2008. 60p. (en); 67p. (ru).
http://www.ilo.org/public/english/region/eurpro/moscow/areas/safety/docs/kg_ohsprof2_en.pdf [in English]
http://www.ilo.org/public/russian/region/eurpro/moscow/areas/safety/docs/kg_oshprof2_ru.pdf [in Russian]

CIS 10-0175 Occupational safety and health in the Republic of Kazakhstan - National profile
Охрана труда в Республике Казахстан. Национальный обзор. [in Russian]
This report reviews the current situation regarding occupational safety and health (OSH) in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Contents: legal framework of the OSH system; technical documentation; mechanisms of shaping the national OSH policy; social partnership and coordination mechanisms; organization of the OSH system; state and dynamics of occupational accidents and diseases; regular measures and routine work in the field of OSH; strength and weaknesses of the national OSH management system; general conclusions from the national profile; legal framework and information resources (regulations, agreements, Internet, journals and other resources); methods for assessing statistical indicators; general information on the country.
ILO Publications, International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 2008. 137p. Illus. (en); 161p. Illus. (ru).
http://www.ilo.org/public/english/region/eurpro/moscow/areas/safety/docs/kz_ohsprof2_en.pdf [in English]
http://www.ilo.org/public/russian/region/eurpro/moscow/areas/safety/docs/kz_oshprof2_ru.pdf [in Russian]

CIS 10-0078 Ledoux E., Bernier J., Thuilier C., Laberge M., Paquin-Collins S.
Field approach for making young workers aware of OHS
Approche terrain pour rejoindre et sensibiliser les jeunes travailleurs à la SST [in French]
As a sequel to "Opération JeuneSST", which the IRSST undertook in 2004 to investigate the specific issue of workers under 25 years of age, this exploratory study examined the actions of an organization involved with young employees in small businesses aimed at raising their consciousness with respect to occupational safety and health (OSH), training, encouraging their cooperation with their employers and improving their working conditions. This study report documents several facets of the young persons' working conditions and OHS, and shows that community intervention can help improve these aspects. It also highlights the need for pursuing youth awareness-raising processes and the interest in exploring new ways of taking action in this regard.
Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail du Québec (IRSST), 505 boul. de Maisonneuve Ouest, Montreal (Quebec) H3A 3C2, Canada, 2008. vii, 111p. Illus. 44 ref. Price: CAD 15.75. Downloadable version (PDF format) free of charge.
http://www.irsst.qc.ca/files/documents/PubIRSST/R-588.pdf [in French]

2006

CIS 12-0217 Getting off to a good start - How you can help young people Wiseup2work
In the United Kingdom, an average of five under-19s is killed and 1500 suffer serious injuries at work every year. Across Europe, young adults have 50 per cent more accidents than older workers. This information sheet presents a web-based resource entitled "Wiseup2work" aimed at getting teenagers to think about safety and health, and invites safety and health professionals to support the campaign within their enterprises.
Institution of Occupational Safety and Health, The Grange, Highfield Drive, Wigston, Leicestershire, LE18 1NN, United Kingdom, Aug. 2006. 3p. Illus. 4 ref.
Getting_off_to_a_good_start_[INTERNET_FREE_ACCESS] [in English]

2002

CIS 11-0599 Mortimer J.T., Harley C., Staff J.
The quality of work and youth mental health
Part-time work may place adolescents at risk because it confronts them with stressors for which they are unprepared and limits participation in more developmentally beneficial activities. However, if working signifies progress in moving toward adulthood, it could promote psychological well-being. Although the controversy surrounding teenage work is focused on employment status and intensity, research on adults indicates that it is the quality of work experience that matters for psychological functioning. This research examines key features of work experience and adolescents' depressive affect and well-being, including both selection and socialization processes. Based on data from the St. Paul Youth Development Study, the analysis indicates that the quality of high school work experience does have significant contemporaneous consequences for the mental states of young people but has little effect on their long-term mental health.
Work and Occupations, May 2002, Vol.29, No.2, p.166-197. 49 ref.