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Inorganic substances - 5,778 entries found

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  • Inorganic substances

1998

CIS 01-175 Le Guen B., Bérard P.
Uranium and its compounds
Uranium et ses composés [in French]
Topics: aerosols; uranium; data sheet; dosimetry; encyclopaedia; exposure evaluation; faecal excretion; France; health hazards; ICRP; ingestion; inhalation; nephrotoxic effects; nuclear fuel processing; permissible levels; radiation monitoring; radioactive substances; skin absorption; uranium and compounds; urinary excretion.
Encyclopédie médico-chirurgicale, Toxicologie-Pathologie professionnelle, 3rd Quarter 1998, No.120, 6p. Illus. 17 ref.
01-0175.pdf [in French]

CIS 00-1671 Yang H.G., Lee B.L., Liang Y.X., Zheng Y.X., Ong C.N.
The effects of exposure to aluminium on neurobehavioural function and dopaminergic metabolism
A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of exposure to aluminium (Al) on the neurobehavioural function and the dopaminergic metabolism among 33 exposed workers compared to 40 controls. Neurobehavioural functions and two end products of catecholamine metabolism, homovanillic acid and vanillymandellic acid, were measured. The mean concentration of Al in urine was significantly higher in the exposed workers than the controls, but no statistical difference was observed for serum Al, suggesting that urinary Al is a better biomarker for Al exposure. The neurobehavioural tests showed significant differences; manual dexterity, eye-hand coordination and memory, were poorer in the Al-exposed workers. The data also showed that both of the catecholamine metabolites were higher in the exposed group.
International Journal of Environmental Health Research, 1998, No.8, p.101-110. 25 ref.
00-1671.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-1132 Laroche P., Cazoulat A., Lecouteulx I., Schoulz D., Gérasimo P.
Thorium 232, the forgotten element of radiological protection
Le thorium 232, cet élément oublié de la radioprotection [in French]
Topics: absorbed dose; carcinogenic effects; thorium; cytotoxic effects; flyash; France; legal aspects; liver cancer; medical supervision; optical industry; radiation protection; radioactive substances; radiological diagnosis; risk factors; thermal power stations; thorium and compounds; welding electrodes.
Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Nov. 1998, Vol.59, No.7, p.469-479. Illus. 34 ref.
00-1132.pdf [in French]

CIS 00-966
Health and Safety Executive
Lead and you: A guide to working safely with lead
Topics: battery and dry cell manufacture; blood monitoring; lead; enamelling; expectant mothers; glass industry; harmful substances; ingestion; inhalation; legal aspects; limitation of exposure; plant safety organization; pottery industry; responsibilities of employees; responsibilities of employers; safe working methods; smelting plants; threshold limit values; training material; United Kingdom.
HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Mar. 1998. 8p.
00-966.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-1101 Carbon monoxide poisoning and death after the use of explosives in a sewer construction project
Topics: carbon monoxide; carboxyhaemoglobin; case study; CO diffusion; confined spaces; construction industry; data sheet; fatalities; manholes; USA; work in sewers.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA, Aug. 1998. 2p.
00-1101.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-795 Massin N., Bohadana A.B., Wild P., Héry M., Toamain J.P., Hubert G.
Respiratory symptoms and bronchial responsiveness in lifeguards exposed to nitrogen trichloride in indoor swimming pools
The objective of the study was to measure the levels of exposure to nitrogen trichloride (NCl3) in the atmosphere of indoor swimming pools and to examine how they relate to irritant and chronic respiratory symptoms, indices of pulmonary function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in lifeguards working in the pools. 334 lifeguards recruited from 46 public swimming pools and 17 leisure centre swimming pools were examined. Mean NCl3 concentrations were greater in leisure than in public pools. A significant concentration-response relation was found between irritant eye, nasal and throat symptoms - but not chronic respiratory symptoms - and exposure concentrations. The data show that lifeguards exposed to NCl3 in indoor swimming pools are at risk of developing irritant eye, nose and throat symptoms. Exposure to NCl3 does not seem to carry the risk of developing permanent bronchial hyperresponsiveness, but this association might have been influenced by self selection.
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Apr. 1998, Vol.55, No.4, p.258-263. 22 ref.
00-795.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-800 Sorahan T., Burges D.C.L., Hamilton L., Harrington J.M.
Lung cancer mortality in nickel/chromium platers 1946-95
The mortality experience of a cohort of 1762 chrome workers (812 men, 950 women) from a large electroplating and light engineering plant was investigated for the period 1946-95. All subjects were first employed in chrome work at the plant during the period 1946-75, and had at least six months employment in jobs associated with exposure to chromic acid mist (hexavalent chromium). Based on mortalities for the general population of England and Wales, male workers with some period of chrome bath work had higher lung cancer mortalities than did other male chrome workers. Similar findings were shown for female workers. After adjusting for sex, age, calendar period, year of starting chrome work, period from first chrome work and employment status there was a significant relationship between duration of chrome bath work and risks of mortality for lung cancer. Duration of other chrome work was not a useful predictor of risks of lung cancer. Similar findings for both variables were obtained relative to risk of chrome nasal ulceration. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that soluble hexavalent chromium compounds are potent human lung carcinogens.
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Apr. 1998, Vol.55, No.4, p.236-242. 18 ref.
00-800.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-752 Approval testing of welders - Fusion welding - Part 2: Aluminium and aluminium alloys - Amendment 1
Qualification des soudeurs - Soudage par fusion - Partie 1: Aluminium et ses alliages - Amendement 1 [in French]
This international standard amends the original standard dated 15 Aug. 1994. Topics: aluminium alloys; aluminium; arc welding and cutting; ISO; joining and fastening; manual arc welding; qualifications; standard; vocational training.
International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1998. ii, 9p. Illus.
00-752f.pdf [in French]
00-752e.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-464 Brancaleone P., Weynand B., De Vuyst P., Stanescu D., Pieters T.
Lung granulomatosis in a dental technician
Combined histological, mineralogical and immunological studies of a dental technician with pulmonary granulomatosis suggest that this condition was most likely related to occupational exposure to beryllium and possibly to aluminium.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Dec. 1998, Vol.34, No.6, p.628-631. Illus. 16 ref.
00_464.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-463 Woskie S.R., Eisen E.E., Wegman D.H., Hu X., Kriebel D.
Worker sensitivity and reactivity: Indicators of worker susceptibility to nasal irritation
Determinants of susceptibility to the irritant effects of sodium borate were studied in 18 workers identified through repeated self-reports of nasal irritation. Susceptibility was characterized by reactivity and sensitivity as estimated from their individual exposure-response model. The use of nasal sprays, current smoking and allergies were associated with lower reactivity, while high exposures to borate dust were associated with higher sensitivity. Use of a toxicokinetic dose model suggested that osmolar activation of mast cells to release histamine and other mediators is a plausible mechanism by which these workers may experience nasal irritation.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Dec. 1998, Vol.34, No.6, p.614-622. 27 ref.
00_463.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-51
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)
Toxicological profile for sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid
Contents: public health statement; health effects; chemical and physical information; production, import, use and disposal; potential for human exposure; analytical methods; regulations and advisories; glossary. Health hazards include: irritation of the respiratory tract; respiratory impairment; chemical burns to skin and eyes; dental erosion; laryngeal cancer.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Toxicology, Toxicology Information Branch, 1600 Clifton Road NE, E-29, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA, Dec. 1998. xix, 189p. Illus. approx. 340 ref.
00051.pdf [in English]

CIS 00-49
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)
Toxicological profile for sulfur dioxide
Contents: public health statement; health effects; chemical and physical information; production, import, use and disposal; potential for human exposure; analytical methods; regulations and advisories; glossary. Health hazards include: irritation of the skin and eyes; pneumotoxic effects, including oedema and bronchoconstriction (the respiratory tract is the primary target system for sulfur dioxide toxicity); haematological effects, including methaemoglobinaemia; neurological effects; cytogenic effects; chromosome aberrations.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Toxicology, Toxicology Information Branch, 1600 Clifton Road NE, E-29, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA, Dec. 1998. xix, 185p. Illus. approx. 560 ref.
00049.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1783 Lead and inorganic compounds of lead
Plomb et composés minéraux [in French]
Uses, physical and chemical properties, pathology and toxicology. Attention is drawn to French legislation relating to occupational safety and health, environmental protection and transport. Recommendations are made concerning technical and medical aspects. Topics: anaemia; biological threshold limits; carcinogenic effects; lead nitrate; lead dioxide; lead tetroxide; lead oxide; lead sulfate; lead sulfide; lead carbonate; lead; lead chloride; lead chromate; data sheet; determination in air; endocrine effects; fire fighting; fire hazards; first aid; France; gastrointestinal diseases; haematotoxic effects; handling and storage; health hazards; hypertension; labelling; lead and compounds; lead poisoning; legislation; limitation of exposure; nephrotoxic effects; neurological effects; personal protective equipment; spills; threshold limit values.
Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1998. 8p. 38 ref.
991783.pdf [in French]

CIS 99-1627
International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS)
Copper
Summaries in French and in Spanish. Topics: cardiovascular diseases; copper(I) oxide; copper; copper(II) chloride; copper sulfate; cirrhosis; copper and compounds; criteria document; dermatitis; eczema; hepatitis; ILO; IPCS; literature survey; metal fume fever; toxic effects; toxicology; UNEP; WHO.
World Health Organization, Distribution and Sales Service, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1998. xxii, 360p. Approx. 1,130 ref. Price: CHF 72.00 (CHF 50.40 in developing countries).
99-1627.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1599 Bergdahl I.A., Strömberg U., Gerhardsson L., Schütz A., Chettle D.R., Skerfving S.
Lead concentrations in tibial and calcaneal bone in relation to the history of lead exposure
Concentraciones de plomo en los huesos tibial y calcáneo en relación con la historia de exposición ocupacional al plomo [in Spanish]
Topics: atomic absorption spectrometry; bones; lead; determination in blood; determination of concentration; dose-response relationship; exposure evaluation; long-term exposure; mathematical models; tibia; x-ray fluorescence.
Medicina y seguridad del trabajo, 1998, Vol.45, No.177, p.71-82. Illus. 34 ref.
99-1599.pdf [in Spanish]

CIS 99-1562 Peters T., Hani N., Kirchberg K., Gold H., Hunzelmann N., Scharffetter-Kochanek K.
Occupational contact sensitivity to aluminium in a machine construction plant worker
Topics: aluminium; case study; eczema; individual susceptibility; machinery industry; sensitization dermatitis; sensitization; skin absorption; skin allergies.
Contact Dermatitis, Dec. 1998, Vol.39, No.6, p.322-323. 23 ref.
99-1562.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1435 Thallium nitrate
Topics: alopecia; amblyopia; blindness; thallium nitrate; coma; data sheet; delayed effects; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; hepatotoxic effects; irritants; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; nephrotoxic effects; neurotoxic effects; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; skin absorption; skin diseases; storage; teratogenic effects; threshold limit values; toxic gases; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1435.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1434 Thallium
Topics: alopecia; blindness; coma; data sheet; delayed effects; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; hepatotoxic effects; irritants; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; nephrotoxic effects; neurotoxic effects; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; skin absorption; skin diseases; storage; thallium; threshold limit values; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1434.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1431 Sodium fluoride
Topics: bronchitis; sodium fluoride; colic; convulsions; data sheet; delayed effects; diarrhoea; dyspnoea; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; irritants; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; nephrotoxic effects; neuromuscular disorders; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; skeletal fluorosis; storage; teratogenic effects; threshold limit values; tremor; USA; vomiting.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1431.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1557 Lidén C., Röndell E., Skare L., Nalbanti A.
Nickel release from tools on the Swedish market
The prevalence on the market of tools that release nickel was investigated. 27% of 565 hand-held tools with metal parts that come into contact with the skin reacted positively in a dimethylgloxime test. Release of nickel and other metals into artificial sweat, and composition of metals on the surface and in the base alloy were also studied. It is suggested that tool producers should consider nickel allergy and avoid nickel-releasing materials, and that analytical methods, relevant for nickel release from tools, should be further developed. Topics: nickel; evaluation of equipment; hand tools; sensitization; skin allergies.
Contact Dermatitis, Sep. 1998, Vol.39, No.3, p.127-131. 15 ref.
99-1557.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1274 Lessenger J.E.
Case study: Hypotension, nausea and vertigo linked to hydrogen cyanamide exposure
A case is described in which a worker experienced hypotension, vertigo, nausea, and puffiness of the face without exposure to alcohol while applying hydrogen cyanamide for use as a growth regulator in kiwi fruit. He was wearing a full protective ensemble and there was no patient history or objective signs of alcohol use. The hypotension was without tachycardia and lasted four days after exposure. This case suggests that an acute intoxication syndrome from the use of hydrogen cyanamide includes hypotension without tachycardia, nausea and vertigo at the onset. The difficulty of obtaining an accurate history is highlighted. Topics: acute poisoning; cyanamide; case study; crop protection; hypotension; orchards; toxic effects; vertigo.
Journal of Agromedicine, 1998, Vol.5, No.3, p.5-11. 16 ref.
99-1274.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1278 Donoghue A.M.
Carbon disulphide absorption during xanthate reagent mixing in a gold mine concentrator
A xanthate reagent mixer at a gold mine concentrator was exposed to carbon disulphide by extensive skin contamination with xanthate powder and solution during the reagent mixing process. Absorption of carbon disulphide was confirmed by the detection of urinary 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TTCA). Drager colorimetric tube testing during subsequent mixing recorded a maximum concentration of at least 60ppm carbon disulphide. An illness consisting of predominantly gastrointestinal symptoms began 20h after the exposure. Although this may have been due to carbon disulphide toxicity this is by no means certain. The need for engineering controls, impervious protective clothing and full-face respirators with particulate and organic vapour cartridges is discussed. Topics: carbon disulfide; case study; determination in air; determination in urine; fatigue; gold mining; migraine; respirators; skin absorption; threshold limit values; toxic effects; urinary metabolites; vomiting; xanthic acids.
Occupational Medicine, Oct. 1998, Vol.48, No.7, p.469-470. 4 ref.
99-1278.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1263 Loughney E., Harrison J.
Irritant contact dermatitis due to 1-bromo-3-chloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin in a hydrotherapy pool. Risk assessments: The need for continuous evidence-based assessments
A physiotherapist working in hydrotherapy presented with irritant contact dermatitis. Subsequent investigation revealed that the likely causative agent was 1-bromo-3-chloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin which was used to disinfect the hydrotherapy pool. A risk assessment had been performed which failed to take full account of current knowledge and this agent had been introduced into the workplace. The development of adverse health effects among staff and other pool users led to a review of the risk assessment and eventually a return to less hazardous chlorine-based disinfection. Had an evidence-based approach been combined with an appropriate assessment prior to and following changes in the workplace then unnecessary risk to employees would not have occurred. Topics: bromine and compounds; case study; dermatitis; disinfectants; eczema; hazard evaluation; health care personnel; irritation.
Occupational Medicine, Oct. 1998, Vol.48, No.7, p.461-463. 7 ref.
99-1263.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1262 Beasley D.M.G., Glass W.I.
Cyanide poisoning: Pathophysiology and treatment recommendations
There is no single treatment regimen for cyanide poisoning which is best for all situations. Besides individual risk factors for antidote toxicity, the nature of the exposure and hence its likely severity, the evolving clinical features and the number of persons involved and their proximity to hospital facilities, all need to be considered. Clinically mild poisoning may be treated by rest, oxygen and amyl nitrite. Intravenous antidotes are indicated for moderate poisoning. Where the diagnosis is uncertain, sodium thiosulphate may be the first choice. With severe poisoning, an additional agent is required. Given the various risks with methaemoglobin formers or with unselective use of kelocyanor, hydroxocobalamin may be preferred from a purely risk-benefit perspective. However the former alternatives will likely remain important. Topics: antidote treatment; hydroxocobalamine; dicobalt edetate; sodium nitrite; sodium thiosulfate; cyanides; poisoning.
Occupational Medicine, Oct. 1998, Vol.48, No.7, p.427-431. Illus. 33 ref.
99-1262.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1261 Masci O., Carelli G., Vinci F., Castellino N.
Blood lead concentration and biological effects in workers exposed to very low lead levels
A longitudinal study was carried out on two groups of workers engaged in tin/lead alloy welding in the telecommunications sector. The risk of exposure was evaluated by measuring levels of airborne lead and concentrations of lead in blood. The correlated effects were assessed by determining zinc protoporphyrin(ZPP) and haemoglobin levels and red blood cell count. Subjective symptoms were also recorded. Results indicated a very low risk of lead exposure during microwelding operations. While blood lead concentrations were significantly higher than those in the general population, they were significantly lower than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's permissible exposure limit. No variation was found in the other biological parameters investigated, and no health effects were observed. During the study period, the introduction of some technological innovations led to a further reduction in lead exposure and,subsequently, to its total elimination. Blood lead concentrations gradually declined to lower values, and ZPP concentrations also decreased to normal levels, demonstrating that the effect of lead on heme synthesis may occur even at very low levels of lead exposure. Topics: biological effects; lead; determination in air; determination in blood; exposure evaluation; haemoglobin; length of exposure; microwelding; porphyrins.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oct. 1998, Vol.40, No.10, p.886-894. Illus. 16 ref.
99-1261.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1126 Infrastructure and systems for risk assessment of metals and metal compounds on human health
Topics: Canada; check lists; epidemiology; metals; metalworking industry; plant health organization; sampling and analysis; sampling instruments; sampling methods; training manuals; training material; training of OSH personnel.
International Council on Metals and the Environment (ICME), 294 Albert Street - Suite 506, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 6E6, Canada, 1st ed., Sep. 1998. iii, 120p. (4 sections). Illus. 16 ref.
99-1126.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1249 Rydzewski B., Sułkowski W., Miarzyńska M.
Olfactory disorders induced by cadmium exposure: A clinical study
The purpose of this study was to evaluate olfactory disorders in workers occupationally exposed to cadmium. In addition to medical history and medical examinations, blood and urine tests were taken and olfactometry performed. The quantitative and qualitative olfactory disorders were evaluated on the basis of the established odour detection threshold and odour identification threshold. The examinations revealed numerous cases of hyposmia and parosmia and one case of anosmia. In the majority of people with olfactory disorders, hypertrophic changes in the nasal mucosa, dependant on the duration of employment, were identified. Statistically significant relationship between olfactory impairment and cadmium concentration in blood, urine and the workplace air was observed. However, such a relationship was not found in regard to the duration of employment. The results of these examinations could be the ground to perform certain preventive and therapeutic procedures. Topics: battery and dry cell manufacture; cadmium; determination in blood; determination in urine; long-term exposure; loss of smell; odour threshold; olfaction; olfactometry; smoking.
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, 1998, Vol. 11, No.3, p.235-245. Illus. 10 ref.
99-1249.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1108 Nitrogen
Topics: asphyxia; data sheet; elimination of spills; explosion hazards; fire hazards; first aid; frostbite; glossary; health hazards; limitation of exposure; New Jersey; nitrogen; personal protective equipment; storage; threshold limit values; unconsciousness; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1108.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1103 Lead phosphate
Topics: anaemia; antifertility effects; brain injuries; carcinogens; lead phosphate; colic; cramps; data sheet; disturbances of coordination; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; hypertension; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; migraine; nephrotoxic effects; neurotoxic effects; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; sleep disturbances; storage; teratogenic effects; threshold limit values; USA; vomiting.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1103.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1102 Lead iodide
Topics: anaemia; antifertility effects; brain injuries; lead iodide; colic; cramps; data sheet; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; hypertension; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; migraine; nephrotoxic effects; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; sleep disturbances; storage; threshold limit values; USA; vomiting.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1102.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1099 Potassium nitrite
Topics: potassium nitrite; data sheet; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; irritation; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; methaemoglobinaemia; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; storage; teratogenic effects; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1099.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1098 Potassium nitrate
Topics: potassium nitrate; data sheet; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; irritation; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; methaemoglobinaemia; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; storage; teratogenic effects; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1098.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1097 Potassium fluoride
Topics: potassium fluoride; caustic substances; data sheet; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; irritants; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; storage; threshold limit values; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1097.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1096 Potassium chlorate
Topics: potassium chlorate; data sheet; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; irritation; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; methaemoglobinaemia; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; storage; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1096.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1095 Potassium arsenate
Topics: carcinogens; potassium arsenate; data sheet; elimination of spills; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; irritation; limitation of exposure; lung cancer; medical examinations; neurotoxic effects; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; skin cancer; storage; teratogenic effects; threshold limit values; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1095.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1092 Nitrous oxide
Topics: nitrous oxide; data sheet; elimination of spills; explosion hazards; eye irritation; fire hazards; first aid; glossary; health hazards; irritation; limitation of exposure; medical examinations; neurotoxic effects; New Jersey; personal protective equipment; storage; teratogens; threshold limit values; USA.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Right to Know Program, PO Box 368, Trenton, NJ 08625-0368, USA, 1998. 6p.
99-1092.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-1323 Joksić G., Spasojević-Tišma V.
Chromosome analysis of lymphocytes from radiation workers in tritium-applying industry
Topics: analysis of chromosome aberrations; tritium; chromosome changes; determination in urine; exposure tests; luminous paints; lymphocytes; radiation injury.
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1998, Vol.71, p.213-220. Illus. 39 ref.
99-1323.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-860 Hansen G., Bell L., Dunlop T.
Approved code of practice for safety and health in tree work. Part 3: River and stream operations
See CIS 95-199 for part 1: Arboriculture, and CIS 96-710 for part 2: Maintenance of trees around power lines. Topics: chain saws; directive; fire protection; flammable substances; forestry; glossary; New Zealand; personal protective equipment; power-driven hand tools; qualifications; safe working methods; safety and health training; safety guides; tree felling; tree pruning; water; work above water.
Occupational Safety & Health Service, Department of Labour, Wellington, New Zealand, Aug. 1998. 122p. Illus. Price: NZD 15.00.
99-860.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-911 Järup L., Bellander T., Hogstedt C., Spång G.
Mortality and cancer incidence in Swedish battery workers exposed to cadmium and nickel
In a long-term study of battery workers exposed to nickel hydroxide and cadmium oxide, there was an increased overall risk for lung cancer. No exposure-response relation was observed between cumulative exposure and risk of lung cancer. There was a highly significant risk of cancer of the nose and nasal sinuses, which may have been caused by exposure to nickel or cadmium or a combination of both exposures. Topics: battery and dry cell manufacture; cadmium; cancer; nickel; cohort study; latency; length of exposure; lung cancer; morbidity; mortality; nasal cancer.
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Nov. 1998, Vol.55, No.11, p.755-759. 24 ref.
99-911.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-852 Massin N., Toamain J.P., Bohadana A., Héry M., Wild P.
Swimming instructors and life guards: A high rate of ocular and respiratory irritation signs
Maîtres nageurs: un taux élevé de signes d'irritations oculaires et respiratoires [in French]
Topics: chlorine and compounds; chronic respiratory diseases; exposure evaluation; eye irritation; irritants; maximal expiratory flow; nitrogen chlorides; nitrogen trichloride; questionnaire survey; swimming pools; ventilatory capacity.
Travail et sécurité, May 1998, No.572, p.36-39. Illus.
99-852.pdf [in French]

CIS 99-943
Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden)
Chromium and its inorganic compounds - Health-based recommended occupational exposure limit
Summary in Dutch. Topics: carcinogenic effects; chromium; chromates; chromium and compounds; criteria document; eczema; irritants; lung diseases; Netherlands; perforation of the nasal septum; renal damage; respiratory diseases; sensitization dermatitis; skin allergies; threshold limit values; toxicity evaluation; toxicology.
Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 1236, 2280 CE Rijswijk, Netherlands, 1998. 80p. 101 ref.
99-943.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-880 Lai J.S., Kwo H.W., Liao F.C., Lien C.H.
Sister chromatid exchange induced by chromium compounds in human lymphocytes
In a study of chromium and nickel-chromium electroplating workers, blood and urine chromium concentrations were highest among chromium workers, next highest among nickel-chromium workers and lowest among a non-exposed control group. After adjustment for smoking, values of sister chromatid exchange (SCE)/cell followed a similar pattern. Among smokers with high levels of chromium exposure, a synergistic effect resulted: percentages of high-frequency cells were higher in this group than in any other. Analysis of SCE in lymphocytes is useful for the evaluation of the biological effects of environmental mutagens. Topics: analysis of chromosome aberrations; nickel; case-control study; chromium and compounds; chromosome changes; determination in blood; determination in urine; electroplating; genetic effects; length of exposure; lymphocytes; mutagens; smoking; synergism.
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nov. 1998, Vol.71, No.8, p.550-553. Illus. 16 ref.
99-880.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-877 Woods J.S., Martin M.D., Leroux B.G.
Validity of spot urine samples as a surrogate measure of 24-hour porphyrin excretion rates
This study tested the validity of using the spot urine sample as a surrogate measure of 24h porphyrin, mercury and creatinine concentrations among 146 dentists exposed to low levels of mercury vapour. Results support the view that spot urine samples may be used to derive reasonably accurate estimates of 24h porphyrin and mercury excretion rates in male subjects. In contrast, time of day appears to be of considerably greater importance when spot samples are used as 24h estimates of either porphyrin or mercury excretion rates among females. Additionally, time of day may be an important consideration in studies involving serial (repeated) porphyrin or mercury measurements using spot urine samples, irrespective of gender distribution of study subjects. Topics: mercury; cohort study; coproporphyrins; creatinine excretion; dental services; determination in urine; porphyrin metabolism; porphyrins; sex-linked differences; urinary excretion.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dec. 1998, Vol.40, No.12, p.1090-1101. Illus. 34 ref.
99-877.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-872 Bhushan M., Craven N.M., Beck M.H.
Contact allergy to methyl ethyl ketone peroxide and cobalt in the manufacture of fibreglass-reinforced plastics
Topics: butanone peroxide; cobalt; case study; eczema; epoxy resins; glass fibre reinforced plastics; moulding of plastics; personal protective equipment; protective gloves; sensitization dermatitis; skin allergies; skin tests.
Contact Dermatitis, Oct. 1998, Vol.39, No.4, p.203. 6 ref.
99-872.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-896 Cocco P., Dosemeci M., Heineman E.F.
Brain cancer and occupational exposure to lead
Analysis of data from the death certificates of 27,060 brain cancer cases showed that brain cancer risk increased by probability of exposure to lead among white men and women with high-level exposure, with a significant twofold excess among white men with high probability and high level of exposure. Risks were also elevated for African-American men with high-level exposure. Although exposure assessment was based solely on the occupation and industry reported on the death certificate, these results add to other epidemiologic and experimental findings in lending some support to the hypothesis of an association between occupational exposure to lead and brain cancer risk. Topics: brain cancer; case-control study; exposure evaluation; lead and compounds; mortality; race-linked differences; sex-linked differences.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Nov. 1998, Vol.40, No.11, p.937-942. 26 ref.
99-896.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-561 Kodama Y.
Health effects of nickel compounds (review)
Nickel no seitai eikyou [in Japanese]
A literature survey revealed an increased risk of nasal cancer and lung cancer in nickel refinery workers. Epidemiologic and animal studies show that nickel carbonyl is the most acutely toxic nickel compound. Information on poisoning by other nickel compounds is limited, but allergic contact dermatitis is associated with nickel, both in nickel workers and in the general population. Women are more sensitive to nickel than are men. Kinetics of nickel compounds vary between the compounds. Topics: nickel carbonyl; nickel; health hazards; literature survey; lung cancer; nasal cancer; nickel and compounds; ore reduction; sensitization dermatitis.
Occupational Health Review, Feb. 1998, Vol.10, No.4, p.139-158. Illus. 94 ref.
99-561.pdf [in Japanese]

CIS 99-541 Gawęda E.
Zirconium and its compounds
Cyrkon i jego związki [in Polish]
Topics: atomic absorption spectrometry; description of technique; determination in air; sampling and analysis; zirconium and compounds.
Podstawy i Metody Oceny Środowiska Pracy, 1998, Vol.19, p.55-58. 5 ref.
99-541.pdf [in Polish]

CIS 99-540 Madej M.
Sodium cyanide
Cyjanek sodowy [in Polish]
Topics: sodium cyanide; description of technique; determination in air; sampling and analysis; spectrophotometry.
Podstawy i Metody Oceny Środowiska Pracy, 1998, Vol.19, p.50-54. 2 ref.
99-540.pdf [in Polish]

CIS 99-587 Schwarz Y., Kivity S., Fischbein A., Abraham J.L., Fireman E., Moshe S., Dannon Y., Topilsky M., Greif J.
Evaluation of workers exposed to dust containing hard metals and aluminum oxide
Fourteen workers exposed to hard metals and aluminium oxide were evaluated by bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage or by transbronchial biopsy. Microchemical analysis of transbronchial biopsies showed a high lung burden of exogenous particles, especially metals related to their hard metals exposure. Lung tissue and cellular changes which were associated with exposure to hard metals and aluminium oxide corresponded well with the microanalytic test results.Three workers had diffuse interstitial inflammatory changes at biopsy, two of whom were asymptomatic with normal chest X-ray films and one who had clinically evident disease with severe giant cell inflammation. Two other workers showed focal inflammation. The worker showing clinical disease and one asymptomatic worker with interstitial inflammatory changes had elevated bronchoalveolar lavage fluid-eosinophilia counts. Topics: airborne dust; aluminium oxide; bronchoscopy; chest radiography; epidemiologic study; hard metal pneumoconiosis; Israel; lung biopsy; lung deposition; lung diseases; metals; pulmonary fibrosis; respiratory function tests; smoking.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1998, Vol.34, No.2, p.177-182. 29 ref.
99-587.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-589 De Raeve H., Vandecasteele C., Demedts M., Nemery B.
Dermal and respiratory sensitization to chromate in a cement floorer
A 48-year-old floorer, occupationally exposed to cement and with a documented chromate contact dermatitis, reported dyspnoea and wheezing after work. These conditions were demonstrated by self-measured sequential peak expiratory flows. A first bronchial provocation test (BPT) with potassium dichromate led to pronounced and sustained decreases in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity, accompanied by pruritis, a decrease in arterial PO2, a slight rise in temperature, and peripheral blood leukocytosis. Two years later, a BPT with a lower dose of potassium chromate led to an "early late" reaction accompanied by pruritis. A BPT with dry cement containing 12ppm hexavalent chromium was borderline, and a similar result was obtained after smoking 5 cigarettes laced with 10mg of cement per cigarette. The report shows that a subject with allergic contact dermatitis to chromates may develop a respiratory allergic reaction to an airborne source of this metal. Smoking of cigarettes contaminated with cement may have been a significant factor in the causation or elicitation of these reactions. Topics: allergic respiratory disorders; allergy tests; asthma; Belgium; potassium dichromate; case study; chromates; construction work; eczema; pulmonary function; sensitization dermatitis; sensitization; skin allergies; smoking.
American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1998, Vol.34, No.2, p.169-176. Illus. 33 ref.
99-589.pdf [in English]

CIS 99-531 Jakubowski M., Trzcinka-Ochocka M., Raźniewska G., Frydrych J.
Blood lead levels in industrial workers in Poland
The study assessed lead exposure, based on Pb-B determinations, of 2,489 workers employed in 13 different types of industry with exposure to lead, including manufacture of crystal glass, battery manufacture, copper and zinc smelters, and welding in a ship repair yard. Results indicated that exposure to lead continues to be a serious problem in Polish industry. Pb-B levels exceeded the Polish biological exposure index (BEI) of 500µg/L for male workers in about 30% of cases. 65% of the women under 45 years of age presented Pb-B levels higher than the 300µg/L recommended as the BEI for this age group. Topics: lead; determination in blood; exposure evaluation; job-exposure relation; limitation of exposure; Poland.
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, 1998, Vol.11, No.1, p.59-67. Illus. 20 ref.
99-531.pdf [in English]

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