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Document ID (ISN)111933
CIS number 11-0526
ISSN - Serial title 0019-8366 - Industrial Health
Year 2011
Convention or series no.
Author(s) Wang L.J., Chen C.K., Hsu S.C., Lee S.Y., Wang C.S., Yeh W.Y.
Title Active job, healthy job? Occupational stress and depression among hospital physicians in Taiwan
Bibliographic information 2011, Vol.49, p.173-184. Illus. 52 ref.
Internet access Active_job.pdf [in English]
Abstract The objective of this study was to assess the levels and association of occupational stress and depression rate among physicians, and to compare physicians' occupational stress with that of Taiwanese employees in other occupations. The subjects were physicians employed at 14 participating regional hospitals. Self-administered questionnaires capturing data on demographics, occupational characteristics, occupational stress measured using Job Content Questionnaire and health status measured using Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire were sent to eligible physicians. Results revealed that the depression rate (13.3%) was higher than that found in the general population (3.7%) of Taiwan. The mean scores of the dimensions "work demands" and "job control" were both much higher than for most occupations in Taiwan. Higher depression scores were found in subjects with higher work demands, 8-10 days of being on duty per month and more frequent alcohol consumption, while lower depression scores were found in subjects working in the east Taiwan area, with higher job control and with greater workplace social support. Gender, smoking and working hour were not independently correlated with depression, but the interaction of gender and job control also had an independent effect on depression.
Descriptors (primary) Taiwan (China); depressive neurosis; hospitals; health care personnel; stress factors; risk factors; frequency rates
Descriptors (secondary) alcoholism; mental workload; psychology of work organization; comparative study; questionnaire survey; sex-linked differences
Document type D - Periodical articles
Subject(s) Commerce, services, offices
Psychology and sociology
Broad subject area(s) Occupational medicine, epidemiology
Stress, psychosocial factors
Browse category(ies) Mental health
Mental stress and burnout
Mental workload
Health care services