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CISDOC database

Document ID (ISN)109575
CIS number 09-730
ISSN - Serial title 0962-7480 - Occupational Medicine
Year 2008
Convention or series no.
Author(s) Estryn-Behar M., van der Heijden B., Camerino D., Fry C., Le Nezet O., Conway P.M., Hasselhorn H.M.
Title Violence risks in nursing - Results from the European "NEXT" study
Bibliographic information Mar. 2008, Vol.58, No.2, p.107-114. 26 ref.
Internet access http://occmed.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/58/2/107 [in English]
Abstract Recent research suggests that violence in health care is increasing and that it strongly influences the recruitment and retention of nurses as well as sick leave and burnout levels. The objective of this study was to identify the prevalence of violence in nursing and to provide a basis for appropriate interventions. A total of 39,894 nurses from 10 European countries responded to a questionnaire at baseline and one year later. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between frequency of violence, factors related to teamwork and various work-related factors and outcomes, such as burnout, intention to leave nursing and intention to change institution. Findings are discussed. This study supports efforts aimed at improving teamwork-related factors as they are associated with a decrease in violence against nurses.
Descriptors (primary) mental health; nursing personnel; violence; risk factors; stress factors
Descriptors (secondary) human relations; comparative study; Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Belgium; United Kingdom; Germany; Finland; France; Italy; change of employment; questionnaire survey; statistical evaluation; frequency rates; Slovak Republic
Document type D - Periodical articles
Country / State or ProvinceGermany; France; Italy; Netherlands
Subject(s) Commerce, services, offices
Broad subject area(s) Stress, psychosocial factors
Browse category(ies) Health care services
Mental health
Violence
Psychological factors
Violence and terrorism
Mental stress and burnout