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ILO-CIS Bulletin 1996/02-03

CIS 96-391 --- CIS 96-1170

Laws, regulations, directives
Chemical data sheets and criteria documents
Training materials and practical information
Periodicals, books, databases, audiovisuals
   001 General safety, health and conditions of work
   002 Occupational medicine, epidemiology
   003 Industries and occupations
   004 New technologies
   005 Chemical safety
   006 Fires, explosions and major hazards
   007 Electrical safety
   008 Physical hazards
   009 Mechanical hazards, transport
   010 Biological hazards
   011 Physiology, ergonomics
   012 Stress, psychosocial factors


Laws, regulations, directives

CIS 96-391 Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995 [Australia - Queensland]. Offprint from the Queensland Government Gazette, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 1995. 120p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/W/WorkplHSaA95.pdf
http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/qld/consol_act/whasa1995250/
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0391.pdf

This Act (assented to on 11 Apr. 1995, commenced on 1 July 1995), replaces the 1989 Act by the same title (CIS 90-1402). Contents: scope of the Act (excluded areas: mines, petroleum industry, use of explosives, public safety, radioactive substances, traffic, marine safety); definitions; workplace health and safety obligations (by employers, manufacturers, suppliers, owners of high risk plant, workers etc.); compliance standards; advisory standards; industry consultative arrangements (establishment and role of the Workplace Health and Safety Council and of industry committees); workplace consultative arrangements (workplace health and safety representatives and committees); workplace health and safety officers; inspectors (appointment, general powers, improvement and prohibition notices, other investigative powers, other enforcement matters); boards of inquiry; appeals; legal proceedings; offences; issuing of regulations; transitional provisions. Regulations issued and codes of practice approved under the previous Act remain in force until 1 July 1996, unless repealed earlier. In annex: list of offences and penalties; list of plant specified as "high risk"; dictionary of defined terms. (66398)

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CIS 96-392 Health and Safety - The Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996 [United Kingdom]. HMSO Publications, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1996. 18p. Illus. Price: GBP 3.70., ISBN 0-11-054093-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0392.pdf

These Regulations (entry into force: 1 Apr. 1996) introduce into British legislation (including offshore workplaces) measures relating to the provision and use of safety signs and signals required by Directive 92/58/EEC (CIS 93-1752). Contents: provision and maintenance of safety signs; information, instruction and training of employees relating to safety signs. In schedules: minimum requirements concerning safety signs and signals at work (types of signs, interchanging and combining signs); minimum requirements concerning signboards (prohibitory, warning, mandatory, emergency, first-aid and fire-fighting signs); minimum requirements governing signs on containers and pipes, the identification and location of fire-fighting equipment, illuminated signs, acoustic signals, verbal communication and hand signals. The Safety Signs Regulations 1980 (CIS 81-1152) are revoked. Illustrations of standard signs are given throughout. (66391)

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CIS 96-393 Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) (National Standards) Regulations [Australia]. Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia, 1994. iv, 26p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_reg/ohasesr1994809/
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0393.pdf

Regulations issued under the 1991 Act (see CIS 91-1751) concerning employment regulated by Australian Commonwealth authorities. They were originally notified in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette on 13 Dec. 1994, and commenced on 31 Mar. 1995. Part 2 of the Regulations (competency requirements and certification standards) apply to workers operating certain kinds of industrial equipment, as defined in the National Occupational Health and Safety Certification Standard for Users and Operators of Industrial Equipment (CIS 95-2267). Part 3 deals with occupational noise on the basis of the National Occupational Noise Standard (CIS 94-690), limiting noise exposure to 85dB(A) (8h equivalent sound pressure level) and to a peak sound pressure level of 140dB(lin). Relevant duties of manufacturers, employers, employees and contractors are given. Parts 4-9 (plant, manual handling, hazardous substances, confined spaces, storage and handling of dangerous goods, major hazard facilities) contain as yet no provisions. (66395)

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CIS 96-394 Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) (National Standards) Regulations (Amendment) [Australia]. Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia, 1995. 10p.(SR 53), 8p.(SR 98)., ISBN 0-644-44327-2 (SR 53), ISBN 0-644-44832-1 (SR 98) (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0394.pdf

Two amendments to the 1994 Regulations (see CIS 96-393). The principal modifications introduced by SR 1995 No.53 (Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, 29 Mar. 1995) concern employees or contractors performing work without a certificate (while undergoing training or otherwise) and exemptions from certificates. The principal modifications introduced by SR 1995 No.98 (Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, 18 May 1995) concern the duties of employers and employees in workplaces where manual handling is performed to maintain safe working conditions, to carry out risk assessment and to exercise risk control. (66396)

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CIS 96-395 Council Directive 95/63/EC of 5.12.1995 amending Directive 89/655/EEC concerning the minimum safety and health requirements for the use of work equipment by workers at work (2nd individual Directive within the meaning of Art.16 (1) of Directive 89/391/EEC) [European Communities]. (French: Dir. 95/63/CE du Conseil, du 5.12.1995, modifiant la dir. 89/655/CEE concernant les prescriptions minimales de sécurité et de santé pour l'utilisation par les travailleurs d'équipements de travail (2e dir. au sens de l'art.16(1) de la dir. 89/391/CEE [Communautés européennes]) Official Journal of the European Communities - Journal officiel des Communautés européennes, 30 Dec. 1995, Vol.38, No.L 335, p.28-36. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0395en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0395fr.pdf

These amendments to directive 89/655/CEE (CIS 90-357) deal with the inspection of equipment that the employer must carry out, and the ergonomic principles which must be taken into account by the employer when applying minimum health and safety requirements. (66957)

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CIS 96-396 Sanitary facilities in enterprises [France]. (French: Installations sanitaires des entreprises [France]) Soudry C., Ministère du Travail (France), Documents pour le médecin du travail, 2nd Quarter 1995, No.62, p.127-140. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0396.pdf

Survey of French legislation concerning sanitary facilities at the workplace. References are included to measures of interest to: 1) responsible chiefs (concerning: dressing rooms, washrooms, showers in the case of dangerous/dirty work (with a list of such jobs), work with outside contractors, construction sites (short- and long-term sites, migrant workers, workers living communally, measures specific to certain jobs or industries)); 2) construction site supervisors (concerning: ventilation, instructions). (66698)

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CIS 96-397 Directives adopted within the field of safety, hygiene and health at work [Denmark]. EuroEcho, Dec. 1995, 16p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0397.pdf

List of European Communities OSH Directives adopted by Denmark by Dec. 1995. For each Directive, the following information is given: title, EEC No., nature of Danish harmonization (total or optional), effective date in Denmark (if after 1 Jan. 1992). Classification of the Directives is by broad subject: general; pressure vessels; construction; machinery, lifts and hoists; personal protective equipment; noise; tractors; marketing of dangerous substances and preparations; classification of dangerous substances; plant protection products; major hazards; biotechnology; cosmetics; CE markings; explosive atmospheres; ionizing radiation. (66724)

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CIS 96-398 Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act [South Africa]. (Afrikaans: Wet of Bedryfsiektes in Myne en Bedrywe) In: Statutes of the Republic of South Africa, 1994, p.1171-1276. (In Afrikaans, English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0398af.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0398en.pdf

The original Act was assented to on 19 June 1973, and it commenced on 1 Oct. 1973. This version incorporates all amendments up to and including the Amendment Act No.208 of 1993. Contents: definitions (the following are defined as compensable diseases, if relatable to risk work: pneumoconiosis, tuberculosis, permanent obstruction of the airways, permanent cardio-respiratory disease, progressive systemic sclerosis); establishment and functions of the Medical Bureau for Occupational Diseases; control (supervision) and risk determination in mines and mine works; certificates of fitness, and medical and other examinations; certification of compensable diseases; appointment and functions of the Compensation Commissioner for Occupational Diseases and organization of the Compensation Fund; determination of compensation payments; research and special medical treatment; making of regulations. Certain laws, in particular the Pneumoconiosis Compensation Act, 1962, are repealed. (66399)

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CIS 96-399 Decree No.95-1196 of 6 Nov. 1995. Schedules of prescribed occupational diseases - Modifications and additions [France]. (French: Décret n°95-1196 du 6 nov. 1995. Tableaux des maladies professionnelles - Modifications et adjonctions [France]) Ministère du Travail et des Affaires sociales, Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 1st Quarter 1996, No.162, p.81-82. Also in: Journal officiel, 10 Nov. 1995. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0399.pdf

Decree No.95-1196 makes the following changes in the French schedules of prescribed occupational diseases: two new schedules of occupational diseases are added to the list established by Article L.461-2 of the Social Security Code: table No.15 bis et 15 ter. In addition, table No.15 is modified both in its title and contents. Three other tables are modified: Nos.16 bis, 25 and 69. (66708)

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CIS 96-400 Environmental Management Act, 1995 [Trinidad and Tobago]. Legal Supplement Part A to the Trinidad and Tobago Gazette, 7 Mar. 1995, Vol.34, No.49, p.i-iv, 16-80. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0400.pdf

This Act was assented to on 7 Mar. 1995. It provides for the management of the environment through the establishment and operation of an Environmental Management Authority, an Environmental Trust Fund and an Environmental Commission. It also deals with the following topics: the National Environmental Policy; environmental incentive programmes; environmental impact assessments; protection of natural resources; pollution and hazardous substances (recordkeeping, monitoring, permits); air and noise pollution (permits, prohibitions); water pollution; waste management and identification; hazardous substances and spills (management, prohibitions, releases and other incidents); compliance and enforcement issues; the Environmental Trust Fund. (66727)

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CIS 96-401 Decree concerning the protection of workers exposed to carcinogenic substances in the workplace, in conformity with Directive 90/394/EEC [Greece]. (Greek: Prostasia tōn ergazomenōn apo tous kindunous pou sundeontai me tēn ekthesē se karkinogonous paragontes kata tēn ergasia se summorfōsē me tēn odēgia tou Sumbouliou 90/394/EOK) Efēmeris tēs Kubernēseos tēs Ellēnikēs Dēmokratias, 19 Dec. 1994, No.221, p.3992-3996. (In Greek)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0401.pdf

Implementation into Greek legislation of Directive 90/394/EEC (CIS 90-1758). Summary: definition of "carcinogens"; recommended characteristics of work equipment and workplaces; obligations of employers (hazard evaluation, reduction of use and replacement of products, prevention and reduction of exposure, notification of the competent authority, action in the case of unforeseen and foreseen exposure, access to risk areas, hygiene and individual protection measures, education and information of workers, consultation and participation of workers, health surveillance, record keeping); miscellaneous provisions (list of substances and methods, recommendations for medical surveillance of workers, enforcement and penalties). (66394)

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CIS 96-402 Directives No.1 and No.2 of 20 Dec. 1995 - Determination of benzene concentration in the working environment; Health surveillance of workers for the prevention of occupational exposure to benzene [Brazil]. (Portuguese: Instruções Normativas n.°1 e n°2, de 20 de dezembro de 1995 - Avaliação das concentrações de benzeno em ambientes de trabalho; Vigilância da saúde dos trabalhadores na prevenção da exposição ocupacional ao benzeno) Revista CIPA, Feb. 1996, Vol.17, No.195, p.98-106. 6 ref. (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0402.pdf

These Directives became effective on the day they were published in the Diário Oficial of 4 Jan. 1996 (p.127, 130). Their issue was necessitated by the adoption of various Brazilian legal instruments related to benzene and harmful substances, and in particular by the ratification by Brazil of ILO Convention 136 and the approval of ILO Recommendation 144 relating to benzene. Directive No.1 covers: definitions; sampling and measurement methods; reporting of results. In annex: recommended statistical methods. Directive No.2 covers: required constituents of a medical surveillance programme related to benzene exposure; required action in the case of accidental exposure; workers' rights relative to benzene exposure; medical overview of benzene toxicity. (66496)

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CIS 96-403 Regulation No.14 of 20 Dec. 1995 on carcinogens [Brazil]. (Portuguese: Portaria n°14, de 20 de dezembro de 1995 - Substâncias cancerígenas) Revista CIPA, Feb. 1996, Vol.17, No.195, p.106-109. (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0403.pdf

This Regulation became effective on the day of its publication in the Diário Oficial of 22 Dec. 1995 (p.21,865 I). It modifies the list of carcinogens contained in Annex 13 of Regulatory Standard No.15 of 8 June 1978 (mod. by Reg. SSST No.3 of 10 Mar. 1994), by prohibiting all exposure to or contact with the following carcinogens: 4-aminobiphenyl, 2-naphthylamine, 4-nitrobiphenyl and benzidine (production of which is also prohibited). New measures concerning benzene are added: all enterprises (except those producing distilled alcohol) that produce, transport, store, use or manipulate benzene or its liquid mixtures (with >1% benzene content) must register themselves with the national safety and health authority (SSST) and must prepare a Programme for the Prevention of Occupational Exposure to Benzene (PPEOB). A new Annex 13-A (Benzene) is added: measures for the protection of workers exposed to benzene; registration procedures for enterprises that produce etc. benzene; preparation and implementation of PPEOBs; exposure limits (1ppm for most enterprises, 2.5ppm for steelworks); what to do in case of accidental exposure. (66497)

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CIS 96-404 Decrees No.96-97 and No.96-98 of 7 Feb. 1996 and Orders of 7 Feb. 1996. Asbestos - Protection of exposed persons [France]. (French: Décrets n°96-97 et n°96-98 du 7 fév. 1996 et arrêtés du 7 fév. 1996. Amiante - Protection des personnes exposées [France]) Ministère du Travail et des Affaires sociales, Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 1st Quarter 1996, No.162, Note No.2015-162-96, p.73-80. Also in: Journal officiel, 8 Feb. 1996. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0404.pdf

This note contains the following legal texts: 1) Decree No.96-97 concerning the protection of the population against asbestos in existing buildings. 2) Decree No.96-98 concerning the protection of workers against the inhalation of asbestos dust in the following activities: manufacturing and transformation of asbestos-containing materials; encapsulation and removal of asbestos; activities involving materials or equipment likely to release asbestos fibres into the atmosphere. 3) The two Orders dated 7 Feb. 1996 concern: licensing conditions for organizations authorized to evaluate asbestos dust concentrations in the indoor air of existing buildings; methods for the evaluation of the state of sprayed asbestos and asbestos-containing insulation and for the measurement of dust levels in existing buildings. (66707)

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CIS 96-405 Decree No.87-200 of 25.3.1987 modifying the provisions of the French Labour Code ... and concerning safety data sheets and DRT Circular No. 90/2 of 23.2.1990 [France]. (French: Décret n°87-200 du 25.3.1987 modifiant les dispositions du code du travail (2e partie: Décrets en Conseil d'Etat) et relatif aux fiches de données de sécurité et circulaire DRT du 23.2.1990 [France]) Journal officiel de la République française, 27 Mar. 1987, 119th year, No.73, p.3451. + 23 Feb. 1990, No.90/2, p.647-650. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0405.pdf

Since 1 April 1988, Decree No.87-200 of 25 March 1987, incorporated into the French Labour Code as article R.231-46-1, has required suppliers and manufacturers to provide company managers with safety data sheets on the chemicals they supply. This circular takes a look at the results obtained in the two years since the decree came into force and answers the following questions: end-users of data sheets (employers, but also occupational physicians and health and safety committees); definition and colour of data sheets; type of products covered, transmission modes; verification by the labour inspectorate; European prospects. (66741)

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CIS 96-406 Council Directive 93/75/EEC of 13.09.1993 concerning minimum requirements for vessels bound for or leaving Community ports and carrying dangerous or polluting goods [European Communities]. (French: Directive 93/75/CEE du Conseil, du 13.09.1993, relative aux conditions minimales exigées pour les navires à destination des ports maritimes de la Communauté ou en sortant et transportant des marchandises dangereuses ou polluantes [Communautés européennes]) Official Journal of the European Communities - Journal officiel des Communautés européennes, 5 Oct. 1993, Vol.36, No.L 247, p.19-27. Appendices. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0406en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0406fr.pdf

This directive lists the type of information that the operator of a vessel leaving or entering a port should report to the competent authority. It also presents the check-list which the operator must fill in. (66956)

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CIS 96-407 Commission Directive 81/957/EEC of 23.10.1981 adapting to technical progress for the 3rd time Council Directive 67/548/EEC on the approximation of laws, regulations and administrative provisions relating to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances [European Communities]. (French: Dir. 81/957/CEE de la Commission, du 23.10.1981, portant 3e adaptation au progrès technique de la dir. 67/548/CEE concernant le rapprochement des dispositions législatives ... relatives à la classification, l'emballage et l'étiquetage des substances dangereuses [Communautés européennes]) Official Journal of the European Communities - Journal officiel des Communautés européennes, 7 Dec. 1981, Vol.24, No.L 351, p.5-44. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0407en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0407fr.pdf

This directive amends Annex I of Directive 67/548/EEC (CIS 92-23) concerning the list of dangerous substances. (66958)

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CIS 96-408 Commission Directive of 25.03.1982 adapting to technical progress for the 4th time Council Directive 67/548/EEC on the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions relating to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances [European Communities]. (French: Dir. de la Commission, du 25.03.1982, portant 4e adaptation au progrès technique de la dir. 67/548/CEE concernant le rapprochement des dispositions législatives ... relatives à la classification, l'emballage et l'étiquetage des substances dangereuses [Communautés européennes]) Official Journal of the European Communities - Journal officiel des Communautés européennes, 21 Apr. 1982, Vol.25, No.L 106, p.18-19. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0408en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0408fr.pdf

This directive amends Annex I of directive 67/548/EEC (CIS 92-23). It applies only to hydrazine solutions of 5-64% concentration. (66959)

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CIS 96-409 European Agreement concerning the international carriage of dangerous goods by road (ADR) and protocol of signature [United Nations]. United Nations, Publications and Sales, Palais des Nations, 1211 Genève 10, Switzerland, 1994. 2 vols. (xxi, 591p. + vi, 395p.). Illus., ISBN 92-1-139044-3, ISBN 92-1-139045-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0409.pdf

This two-volume set comprises the 17 articles of the Agreement, the Protocol of signature, the annexes in the form in which they entered into force on 29 July 1968 and amendments up to 1 January 1995. Annex A covers the provisions concerning dangerous substances and articles and Annex B covers provisions concerning transport equipment and transport operations. Replaces previous edition (see CIS 93-361). (66466)

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CIS 96-410 Health and Safety - The Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 1992 [United Kingdom]. HMSO Publications, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1992. 54p. Illus. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0410.pdf

Implementation in Great Britain of the Machinery Directive (89/392/EEC, see CIS 89-1442), entry into force: 1 Jan. 1993. It applies to most kinds of machinery (excluded are, among others: most kinds of equipment used for lifting persons; medical machinery; equipment in fairgrounds; pressure vessels; machinery involving radioactivity; firearms; storage tanks and pipelines; transport vehicles; tractors; military and police machinery; machinery covered by other EEC Directives). Main provisions of the Regulations: suppliers of machinery have to ensure that it is "in fact safe", that it satisfies the relevant OSH requirements, that it undergoes EC conformity procedures and (except for "incorporated" equipment) that the EC mark is properly affixed. Special provisions concern: drawing up of technical files; application of transposed harmonized standards; approved bodies for conformity assessments; certificates of adequacy; EC type-examinations and declarations of conformity; EC marks; enforcement. Some existing UK legislation is modified. In annex: essential health and safety requirements relating to the design and construction of machinery (general, controls, protection against mechanical hazards, guards and protection devices, other hazards, indicators, special categories of machinery, hazards due to the mobility of machinery, hazards due to lifting operations); machinery posing special hazards. (66392)

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CIS 96-411 The Supply of Machinery (Safety) (Amendment) Regulations 1994 [United Kingdom]. HMSO Publications, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1994. 13p. Illus. Price: GBP 3.20., ISBN 0-11-045063-9 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0411.pdf

Amendments of the 1992 Regulations (see CIS 96-410). They implement in Great Britain Directive 93/44/EEC (CIS 93-1435) and other modifications of the Machinery Directive (89/392/EEC, see CIS 89-1442). The principal amendment concerns safety components for machinery which are supplied separately. Other changes involve the replacement of the "EC Mark" by the "CE Marking". Liftting equipment designed for raising and/or moving persons is now included within the scope of the Regulations, but further exclusions of other kinds of lifting equipment are specified. Other minor modifications are made. Most of the provisions of this amendment come into force on 1 Sep. 1994. (66393)

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CIS 96-412 Circular DEPSE/SDTE/C 95-7011-DRT No.95-6 of 8 March 1995 concerning the medical surveillance of workers involved in the handling of food products of animal origin [France]. (French: Circulaire DEPSE/SDTE/C 95-7011-DRT n°95-6 du 8 mars 1995 relative à la surveillance médicale des salariés procédant à la manipulation des denrées animales et d'origine animale [France]) Ministère du Travail (France), Documents pour le médecin du travail, 1st Quarter 1995, No.61, p.65-66. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0412.pdf

This circular applies to workers who handle, in their normal work, food and food products of animal origin (meat, seafood, milk, eggs etc.). Such workers must observe very high standards of personal hygiene and must wear very clean clothing. In addition, they must possess a medical certificate stating either that there is no health reason to prevent them from working in such establishments or that they do not have certain diseases, and are not carriers of certain microorganisms or parasites. (66694)

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[ Top of page ]

Chemical data sheets and criteria documents

CIS 96-413 2-Vinyl toluene. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0413.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the kidneys and the nervous system. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 50ppm, 242mg/m3 (TWA), 100ppm, 483mg/m3 (STEL) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66531)

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CIS 96-414 3-Vinyl toluene. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0414.pdf

International chemical safety card (synonym: 3-methylstyrene). Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; neurotoxic effects. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 50ppm, 242mg/m3 (TWA), 100ppm, 483mg/m3 (STEL) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66532)

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CIS 96-415 4-Vinyl toluene. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0415.pdf

International chemical safety card (synonym: 4-methylstyrene). Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; neurotoxic effects. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 50ppm, 242mg/m3 (TWA), 100ppm, 483mg/m3 (STEL) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66533)

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CIS 96-416 trans-beta-Methyl styrene. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0416.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin irritation. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 50ppm, 242mg/m3 (TWA), 100ppm, 483mg/m3 (STEL) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66534)

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CIS 96-417 2,4,4-Trimethyl-2-pentene. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0417.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin irritation; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system). (66535)

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CIS 96-418 Stannous chloride dihydrate. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0418.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may have neurotoxic effects (central nervous system) and may affect the blood chemistry when ingested. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the liver when ingested. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 2mg/m3 (as tin) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66536)

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CIS 96-419 4-Aminobiphenyl. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0419.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; eye irritation; may affect the bladder (haematuria). Long-term exposure effects: human carcinogen; may cause genetic damage in humans. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: A1 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66537)

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CIS 96-420 Chloroacetone. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0420.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation and corrosion of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 1ppm, 3.8mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66538)

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CIS 96-421 Cumene hydroperoxide. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0421.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: corrosive effects on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and on ingestion; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). Occupational exposure limit: PDK: 1mg/m3 (USSR 1988). (66539)

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CIS 96-422 1,3-Cyclohexadiene. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0422.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. (66540)

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CIS 96-423 Magnesium chloride. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0423.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes and respiratory tract. (66541)

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CIS 96-424 Ninhydrin. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0424.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization. (66542)

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CIS 96-425 Paraformaldehyde. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0425.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization. (66543)

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CIS 96-426 Phthalic acid. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0426.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. (66544)

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CIS 96-427 Potassium oxide. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0427.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). (66545)

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CIS 96-428 Pyrogallic acid. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0428.pdf

International chemical safety card (synonym: pyrogallol). Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the liver, kidneys and the blood (decrease in oxygen - the substance has a marked affinity for the oxygen of the blood). Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization. (66546)

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CIS 96-429 Sodium methylate. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0429.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). (66547)

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CIS 96-430 Tartaric acid. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0430.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: corrosive effect on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and on ingestion; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). (66548)

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CIS 96-431 p-Toluenesulfonic acid. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0431.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). (66549)

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CIS 96-432 Antimony. Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg; International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), World Health Organization, 1211 Genève 27, Switzerland, 1993. 2p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0432.pdf

International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: delayed effects; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the lungs and heart function; pneumonitis. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the lungs, respiratory tract and skin; dermatitis. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 0.5mg/m3 (as Sb) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66550)

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CIS 96-433 Cobalt. (Spanish: Cobalto) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0433.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 9-0782. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: asthmatic reactions (may be delayed). Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization; asthma; pneumoconiosis; may affect the lungs and heart function (myocardiopathies). Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 0.05mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66551)

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CIS 96-434 Cobalt (II) chloride. (Spanish: Dicloruro de cobalto) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0434.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 9-0783. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; asthmatic reactions (may be delayed). Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization; asthma; may affect the heart function (myocardiopathies). (66552)

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CIS 96-435 Diphenyl ether. (Spanish: Difenil eter) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0435.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 9-0791. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes and respiratory tract; may affect the liver and kidneys after ingestion. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 1ppm, 7mg/m3 (TWA); 2ppm, 14mg/m3 (STEL). (66553)

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CIS 96-436 Chlorthiamid. (Spanish: Clortiamida) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0436.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 10-0852. International chemical safety card. (66554)

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CIS 96-437 Cristobalite. (Spanish: Cristobalita) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0437.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 10-0809. International chemical safety card. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the lungs: pneumoconiosis (silicosis); human carcinogen. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 0.05mg/m3 (respirable dust) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66555)

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CIS 96-438 Dichlobenil. (Spanish: Diclobenil) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0438.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 10-0867 (synonym: 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile). International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. (66556)

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CIS 96-439 Dichloroacetyl chloride. (Spanish: Cloruro de dicloroacetilo) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0439.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 10-0869. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; watering of the eyes; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). (66557)

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CIS 96-440 2,6-Dichloro-4-nitroaniline. (Spanish: 2,6-Dicloro-4-nitroanilina) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0440.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 10-0871. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. (66558)

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CIS 96-441 Diisopropyl ether. (Spanish: Diisopropil éter) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0441.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 10-0906. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical pneumonitis. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 250ppm, 1040mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991); STEL: 310ppm, 1300mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66559)

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CIS 96-442 Nickel carbonate. (Spanish: Carbonato de níquel) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0442.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 10-0927. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization; asthma; human carcinogen. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as Ni) (TWA): 0.05mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66560)

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CIS 96-443 Quartz. (Spanish: Cuarzo) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0443.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 10-0808. International chemical safety card. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the lungs: pneumoconiosis (silicosis); probable human carcinogen. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 0.1mg/m3 (respirable dust) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66561)

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CIS 96-444 1-Butene (liquefied). (Spanish: But-1-eno (licuado)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0444.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0396. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: may cause frostbite; exposure may result in unconsciousness. (66562)

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CIS 96-445 trans-2-Butene (liquefied). (Spanish: (E)-But-2-eno (licuado)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0445.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0398. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: risk of suffocation in confined areas; rapid evaporation of the liquid may cause frostbite. Occupational exposure limit: PDK: 100mg/m3 (USSR 1971). (66563)

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CIS 96-446 cis-2-Butene (liquefied). (Spanish: (Z)-But-2-eno (licuado)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0446.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0397. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: risk of suffocation in confined areas; rapid evaporation of the liquid may cause frostbite. Occupational exposure limit: PDK: 100mg/m3 (USSR 1971). (66564)

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CIS 96-447 Butylamine. (Spanish: Butilamina) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0447.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0374. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema; narcotic effects. Long-term exposure effects: liquid defats the skin. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 5ppm, 15mg/m3 C (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991); PDK: 10mg/m3 (USSR 1980). (66565)

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CIS 96-448 sec-Butylamine. (Spanish: sec-Butilamina) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0448.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0401. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: corrosive effect on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and on ingestion; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed); visual function disorders. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limit: MAK: 5ppm, 15mg/m3 I,H (1990). (66566)

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CIS 96-449 Butyraldehyde. (Spanish: Butiraldehído) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0449.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0403. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; pulmonary oedema. Long-term exposure effects: may cause congenital malformations. Occupational exposure limit: PDK: 5mg/m3 (USSR 1988). (66567)

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CIS 96-450 Hydrogen cyanide. (Spanish: Cianuro de hidrógeno) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0450.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 7-0492 (synonym: hydrocyanic acid). International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed); gas inhalation may lead to death. Occupational exposure limits: TLV (as C): 10ppm, 11mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991); PDK: 0.3mg/m3 (skin) (USSR 1988). (66568)

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CIS 96-451 Potassium chlorate. (Spanish: Clorato de potasio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0451.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 7-0548. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: delayed effects; irritation of the mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system); may affect the blood chemistry (haemolytic anaemia), liver and kidneys. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. (66569)

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CIS 96-452 1-Chloro-3,4-dinitrobenzene. (Spanish: 1-Cloro-3,4 dinitrobenceno) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0452.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 9-0722. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the blood chemistry: methaemoglobinaemia. (66570)

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CIS 96-453 Benzethonium chloride. (Spanish: Cloruro de bencetonio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0453.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0387. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. (66571)

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CIS 96-454 Hydroxylamine hydrochloride. (Spanish: Cloruro de hidroxilamonio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0454.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 9-0709. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns; may affect blood chemistry: methaemoglobinaemia (cyanosis, brain damage and renal insufficiency). (66572)

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CIS 96-455 Lithium chloride. (Spanish: Cloruro de litio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0455.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 9-0711. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin irritation; may provoke convulsions. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system); may affect renal function; may cause birth malformations. (66573)

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CIS 96-456 Cresol (mixed isomers). (Spanish: Cresol puro (mezcla de isómeros)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0456.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 7-0512 (synonym: cresylic acid). International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; delayed effects; corrosive effect on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and on ingestion; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system). Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; may affect the lungs, kidneys and liver. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 5ppm, 22mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66574)

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CIS 96-457 Demeton-s-methyl. (Spanish: Demetón-s-metil) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0457.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 9-0705 (synonym: metasystox 55). International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; delayed effects; eye irritation; neurotoxic effects. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 0.5mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991); PDK: 0.1mg/m3 (USSR 1988). (66575)

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CIS 96-458 Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene. (Spanish: Dibenzo(a,h)antraceno) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0458.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0431. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the skin, resulting in photosensitization and photoallergy; possible human carcinogen. (66576)

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CIS 96-459 Diethylene benzyl benzoate. (Spanish: Dibenzoato de oxidietileno) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0459.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0447. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: mild eye irritation. (66577)

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CIS 96-460 2,4-Dichlorophenol. (Spanish: 2,4-Diclorofenol) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0460.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0438. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; systemic poisoning. (66578)

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CIS 96-461 Dichlorosilane. (Spanish: Diclorosilano) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0461.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0442. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; pulmonary oedema and asthmatic reactions (may be delayed). Long-term exposure effects: may affect the lungs. (66579)

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CIS 96-462 Diethylamine. (Spanish: Dietilamina) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0462.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0444. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). Long-term exposure effects: liquid defats the skin. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 10ppm, 30mg/m3 (as TWA) (ACGIH 1990-1991); PDK: 30mg/m3 (USSR 1988). (66580)

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CIS 96-463 Diphenylamine. (Spanish: Difenilamina) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0463.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 7-0466. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the kidneys. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 10ppm (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66581)

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CIS 96-464 Calcium hydroxide. (Spanish: Dihidróxido de calcio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0464.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0408. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; corrosive effect on ingestion. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 5mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66582)

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CIS 96-465 Diisopropylamine. (Spanish: Diisopropilamina) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0465.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0449. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed). Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limit: TLV: 5ppm, 21mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66583)

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CIS 96-466 N,N-Dimethylformamide. (Spanish: N,N-Dimetilformamida) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0466.pdf

Spanish version of IPCS ICSC 6-0457. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; may affect the liver; neurotoxic effects. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; may affect the liver. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 10ppm, 30mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991); PDK: 10mg/m3 (skin) (USSR 1988). (66584)

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CIS 96-467 Calcium cyanide. (Spanish: Cianuro de calcio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0467.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0407. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; delayed effects; corrosive effect on the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed); neurotoxic effects; may affect the blood, heart and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as cyanide): 5mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66585)

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CIS 96-468 3-Chlorophenol. (Spanish: 3-Clorofenol) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0468.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0150. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. (66586)

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CIS 96-469 Barium chloride. (Spanish: Cloruro de bario) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0469.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0614. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system); muscular disorders; arrhythmia; paresis. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as barium): 0.5mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66587)

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CIS 96-470 Barium chloride (dihydrate). (Spanish: Cloruro de bario (dihidrato)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0470.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0615. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system); muscular disorders; arrhythmia; paresis. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as barium): 0.5mg/m3 (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66588)

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CIS 96-471 m-Cresol. (Spanish: m-Cresol) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0471.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0646. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; delayed effects; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns; loss of consciousness. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; may affect the lungs, liver and kidneys; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system). (66589)

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CIS 96-472 Decane. (Spanish: Decano) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0472.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0428. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: chemical pneumonitis. Long-term exposure effects: liquid defats the skin; may affect the kidneys and blood. (66590)

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CIS 96-473 Mercuric acetate. (Spanish: Diacetato de mercurio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0473.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0978. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; delayed effects; corrosive effect on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and on ingestion; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed); may affect the kidneys. Long-term exposure effects: dermatitis; renal dysfunction. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as mercury): 0.1mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66591)

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CIS 96-474 Mercury chloride. (Spanish: Dicloruro de dimercurio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0474.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0984. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes. Long-term exposure effects: may affect the kidneys. Occupational exposure limits: TLV (as mercury): 0.1mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991); MAK: 0.05mg/m3. (66592)

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CIS 96-475 Mercuric chloride. (Spanish: Dicloruro de mercurio) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0475.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0979. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; delayed effects; corrosive effect on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and on ingestion; chemical burns; pulmonary oedema (may be delayed); may affect the kidneys. Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization; renal dysfunction. Occupational exposure limit: TLV (as mercury): 0.1mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991). (66593)

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CIS 96-476 Naphthylene diisocyanate. (Spanish: Diisocianato de 1,5-naftileno) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0476.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0653. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; asthmatic reactions. Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization; asthma; may affect the lungs. (66594)

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CIS 96-477 N,N-Dimethylaniline. (Spanish: N,N-Dimetilanilina) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1991. 2p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0477.pdf

Spanish version of future IPCS ICSC 0877. International chemical safety card. Short-term exposure effects: skin absorption; haematotoxic effects: methaemoglobinaemia. Long-term exposure effects: skin sensitization. Occupational exposure limits: TLV: 5ppm, 25mg/m3 (TWA) (skin) (ACGIH 1990-1991); STEL: 10ppm, 50mg/m3 (ACGIH 1991-1992). (66595)

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CIS 96-478 Parathion. (French: Parathion) Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1995. 5p. 28 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0478.pdf

Chemical safety information sheet. Acute toxicity: very toxic (in animal experiments, DL50 = 5-30mg/kg (oral), 6.8-50mg/kg (skin)); skin absorption; delayed effects; blood cholinesterase inhibition; respiratory diseases: bronchospasm, pulmonary oedema; neurotoxic effects (central nervous system): visual function disturbances, convulsions; may affect the pancreas and the peripheral nervous system. Chronic toxicity: may cause polyneuropathy and skin diseases. (66596)

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CIS 96-479 Chloronaphthalenes. (French: Chloronaphtalènes) Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1995. 4p. 19 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0479.pdf

Chemical safety information sheet. Acute toxicity: skin absorption (limited); delayed effects; narcotic effect; skin disorders: chloracne, dermatitis, keratitis, rash; may affect the liver. (66597)

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CIS 96-480 Glyoxal and aqueous solutions. (French: Glyoxal et solutions aqueuses) Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1995. 4p. 34 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0480.pdf

Chemical safety information sheet. Acute toxicity: irritation of the skin and mucous membranes. Chronic toxicity: skin sensitization; skin allergy. (66598)

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CIS 96-481 Nitric oxide - Nitrogen peroxide. (French: Monoxyde d'azote - Peroxyde d'azote) Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1996. 5p. 44 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0481.pdf

Chemical safety information sheet. Acute toxicity: irritation of the eyes and respiratory tract: bronchospasm, pulmonary oedema. Chronic toxicity: may affect the lungs (pulmonary oedema, emphysema). (66599)

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CIS 96-482 Cyclohexylamine. (French: Cyclohexylamine) Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1996. 4p. 21 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0482.pdf

Chemical safety information sheet. Acute toxicity: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; pulmonary oedema; chemical burns; may have neurotoxic and cardiovascular effects. Chronic toxicity: irritation of the skin. (66600)

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CIS 96-483 Pentachloronaphthalene. (Spanish: Pentacloronaftaleno) Noticias de seguridad, Apr. 1996, Vol.58, No.4. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0483.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: skin absorption; skin disorders: chloracne, dermatitis; hepatotoxic effect. (66601)

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CIS 96-484 Stoddard solvent. (Spanish: Solvente de Stoddard) Noticias de seguridad, Apr. 1996, Vol.58, No.4. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0484.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA (synonym: white spirit). Health hazards: irritation of the eyes, skin and upper respiratory tract; narcotic effect; medullary hypoplasia; dermatitis; jaundice. (66602)

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CIS 96-485 Octachloronaphthalene. (Spanish: Octacloronaftaleno) Noticias de seguridad, Mar. 1996, Vol.58, No.3. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0485.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: skin absorption; skin disorders: chloracne, dermatitis; hepatotoxic effect (jaundice). (66603)

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CIS 96-486 Hafnium and compounds (as hafnium). (Spanish: Hafnio y Compuestos (como Hafnio)) Noticias de seguridad, Mar. 1996, Vol.58, No.3. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0486.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: irritation of the eyes, skin and mucous membranes; hepatotoxic effect. (66604)

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CIS 96-487 Acrylonitrile. (Spanish: Acrilonitrilo) Noticias de seguridad, Feb. 1996, Vol.58, No.2. 5p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0487.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes and skin; hypoxia; chemical burns; dermatitis; probable human carcinogen. (66605)

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CIS 96-488 Carbaryl (Sevin (R)). (Spanish: Carbaril (Sevin (R))) Noticias de seguridad, Feb. 1996, Vol.58, No.2. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0488.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: skin absorption; irritation of the skin; blood cholinesterase inhibition: may cause convulsions; may cause birth malformations. (66606)

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CIS 96-489 tert-Butyl alcohol. (Spanish: Alcohol ter-butílico) Noticias de seguridad, Jan. 1996, Vol.58, No.1. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0489.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; dermatitis; narcotic effect. (66607)

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CIS 96-490 Cyclopentadiene. (Spanish: Ciclopentadieno) Noticias de seguridad, Jan. 1996, Vol.58, No.1. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0490.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: irritation of the eyes and upper respiratory tract. (66608)

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CIS 96-491 Allyl alcohol. (Spanish: Alcohol alilo) Noticias de seguridad, Dec. 1995, Vol.57, No.12. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0491.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: skin absorption; irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; chemical burns (eyes and skin); may affect the lungs: pulmonary oedema. (66609)

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CIS 96-492 o-Chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile. (Spanish: O-Clorobencilideno malononitrilo) Noticias de seguridad, Dec. 1995, Vol.57, No.2. 4p. Insert. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0492.pdf

Chemical safety card published by the Consejo Interamericano de Seguridad, 33 Park Place, Englewood, NJ 07631, USA. Health hazards: irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract; tear drawing; eye injuries; chemical burns; dermatitis. (66610)

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CIS 96-493 Occupational safety and health guidelines for chemical hazards - Supplement IV-OHG. U.S. Department of Labor, Publications Dissemination, EID, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA, 1995. approx. 435p. Bibl.ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0493.pdf

Update of a collection of six to eight-page data sheets on pure substances and mixtures originally abstracted under CIS 82-1002. Revisions are given for 11 products in the original collection, and 51 new products are added: calcium (Ca) carbonate (limestone), Ca cyanamide, Ca hydroxide, Ca silicate, Ca sulfate, caprolactam dust and vapour, captafol, captan, carbon tetrabromide, carbon tetrachloride, carbonyl fluoride, catechol, cellulose, cesium hydroxide, chloroacetyl chloride, chlorodifluoromethane, chloropentafluoroethane, chlorpyrifos, o-chlorostyrene, 2-chloro-6-trichloromethylpyridine, o-chlorotoluene, clopidol, cobalt carbonyl, cobalt hydrocarbonyl, crufomate, cyanogen, cyanogen chloride, cyclohexylamine, cyclonite, cyclopentane, diazinon, 2-n-dibutylaminoethanol, dichloroacetylene, 1,3-dichloropropene, 2,2-dichloropropionic acid, dicrotophos, dicyclopentadiene and its iron complex, diethanolamine, diethylenetriamine, diethyl phthalate, dinitolmide, dipropyl ketone, disulfiram, diuron, endosulfan, ethion, ethylene glycol and ethylidene norbornene. (66900)

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[ Top of page ]

Training materials and practical information

CIS 96-494 Using the INTERNET to access health and safety resources. Moore C., Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, 250 Main Street East, Hamilton Ont. L8N 1H6, Canada, 1995. 66p. Illus. Index., ISBN 0-660-16237-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0494.pdf

Guidance document to the use of INTERNET in accessing occupational safety and health (OSH) information. Contents: scope and currency of the publication (current as of Sep. 1995; all the software described is shareware or free software for IBM-compatible computers running MS WindowsTM); general information on the Internet; E-mail discussions; mailing lists; Usenet newsgroups; Telnet; File Transfer Protocol (FTP); Gopher services and clients; World Wide Web (WWW) servers and clients; getting connected to the Internet. In annex: glossary; selected OSH resources on the Internet. (66498)

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CIS 96-495 Industrial hygiene: Instructor's guide. (Spanish: Higiene industrial: Guía del monitor) Bernal Domínguez F., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, C/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1996. 182p. Illus., ISBN 84-7425-437-X (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0495.pdf

Partially as a result of the 1995 Act on the prevention of occupational hazards (see CIS 95-1921), the teaching of the basics of occupational hygiene is becoming very widespread in Spain at all levels of vocational education. This manual is aimed at providing support for instructors of such courses, in the form of objectives, suggestions and - above all - graphic aids. Contents of Part 1 (Theory): introduction to occupational hygiene; chemical contaminants (exposure monitoring, evaluation criteria, exposure control, personal protection); noise; vibration; thermal environment; ionizing and non-ionizing radiation; biological contaminants. Contents of Part 2 (Exercises): identification of chemical contaminants in a manufacturing process; measurement and evaluation of the concentration of chemical contaminants; general ventilation as a means of exposure reduction; evaluation of noise and vibration exposure; evaluation of thermal stress. (66658)

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CIS 96-496 Catalogue: Films and videos used in occupational safety and health - An overall review of international production. (French: Films et vidéos utilisés dans la sécurité et la santé au travail - Un inventaire des réalisations internationales; Spanish: Películas y videos utilizados en la seguridad y la salud en el trabajo - Una revisión general de las producciones internacionales) International Social Security Association (ISSA), Berufsgenossenschaft der Feinmechanik und Elektrotechnik, Gustav-Heinemann-Ufer 130, 50968 Köln, Germany, 1996. ca 280p. Indexes. (In English, French, German, Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0496.pdf

Catalogue of more than 250 films from 25 countries submitted to the Third International Film and Video Festival held during the XIVth World Congress on OSH (Madrid, Spain, 22-26 April 1996). For each item the following information is given: original title in the production language; country of origin; year of production; language; length; nature of media; sale price; publisher (name of organization with address), rental or distributor company; target group; title and short summary in four languages. (66686)

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CIS 96-497 Be safe: The costs of accidents - A guide for small firms. HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. 8p. Free., ISBN 0-7176-1018-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0497.pdf

Training guide aimed at small businesses. It shows how to calculate the full costs of accidents, and explains how the introduction of safety and health management into the everyday running of a company can lead to considerable cost reductions. (66723)

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CIS 96-498 General catalogue of publications - 1996. (Spanish: Catálogo general de publicaciones - 1996) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1996. 54p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0498.pdf

Catalogue of publications available from the Spanish National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (INHST). Classification is by broad subject area: legislation and standardization; technical publications (technical notes and studies, ILO publications, conference proceedings, sampling and analytical methods, medical surveillance, questionnaires); training materials (information sheets, data sheets, brochures, posters etc.); audiovisual materials (videos, slides); computer-based products. (66726)

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CIS 96-499 Safety and health at work in small and medium-sized enterprises. (Greek: Asfaleia kai ugeia kata tēn ergasia stis mikromesaies epiheirēseis) Ellēniko Institouto Ugieinēs kai Asfaleias tēs Ergasias, Patēsiōn 89, 104 34 Athēna, Greece, 1995. 49p. Illus. (In Greek)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0499.pdf

Guide to basic safety and health practices, aimed at small and medium-sized enterprises (acc. to Greek definition, those with <50 employees). Contents: general principles of OSH; work equipment; personal protective equipment; manual handling; work with visual display terminals; carcinogenic agents; lead; asbestos; noise protection; work areas; survey of EEC Directives. (66728)

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CIS 96-500 Poster catalogue 1996. (Spanish: Catálogo de carteles 1996) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo (INSHT), Ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027, Madrid, Spain, 1996. 15p. Illus. ### (In Spanish)

Illustrated catalogue of 48 occupational safety and health posters available from the INSHT. (67020)

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CIS 96-501 How to better understand hygiene. (Dutch: Verstandig omgaan met hygiëne; French: Mieux connaître l'hygiène) Nationale vereniging tot voorkoming van arbeidsongevallen (NVVA), Gachardstraat 88, Bus 4, 1050 Brussel, Belgium, 1996. 21p. Illus. 10 ref., ISBN 2-87112-038-2 (fr), ISBN 90-70902-37-0 (nld) (In Dutch, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0501fr.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0501nl.pdf

Booklet providing basic advice on how to integrate a hygienic approach to one's private life as well as on the working premises. (66685)

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CIS 96-502 General hygiene risks. (Spanish: Riesgos higiénicos generales) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (15min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

General rules on occupational hygiene. Routes of entry of pollutants. Collective and localized exhaust systems. Noise and protective means. (66994)

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CIS 96-503 Safety, health and working conditions - Training manual. (Portuguese: Segurança, saúde e condições de trabalho - Manual de treinamento) International Labour Office (ILO), Joint Industrial Safety Council, P.O. Box 3208, 103 64 Stockholm, Sweden, 1996. 120p. Illus. (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0503.pdf

Translation into Portuguese of the training manual "Safety, Health and Working Conditions", published in English by the Joint Industrial Safety Council of Sweden (CIS 87-148). Aspects covered: safety, health and technical equipment; workplace climate, lighting and noise; chemical risks to health; ergonomics; work organization and working time; daily activity for safety, health and well-being. In appendix: checklist for improving safety, health and working conditions. (66491)

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CIS 96-504 Spanish National Centre for Protective Measures. (Spanish: Centro Nacional de Medios de Protección) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027, Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (14min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

This video describes the functions of the National Centre for Protective Measures and how the laboratories for approval of personal and collective protective equipment operate. (66991)

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CIS 96-505 Occupational safety and health in Vietnam. National Institute of Labour Protection (NILP), 1 Yet Kieu, Hanoi, Vietnam. Videotape. ### (In English)

Contents of this videotape: OSH system in Vietnam; legislation; preventive measures; role of the NILP. (67014)

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CIS 96-506 Posters. (French: Affiches; German: Plakate; Italian: Affissi) Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, Arbeitssicherheit, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Sep. 1995. 45p. Illus. (In French, German, Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0506.pdf

The SUVA posters listed in this brochure are classified under 3 major headings: safety at work and health protection (personal protective equipment; falls; toxic substances and gases; ladders and hand tools; traffic and transport; maintenance; ergonomics; drug addiction prevention; construction; forestry; miscellaneous); leisure safety (sports; D.I.Y. (handiwork) and gardening); safety signs (ladders; eyes; hearing; poisonous substances; alcohol; SUVA). The catalogue includes pictures of the posters and signs as well as reference numbers for ordering purposes and an order form. (66941)

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CIS 96-507 First aid (Artificial respiration). (Spanish: Primeros auxilios (Respiración artificial)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (10min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

Causes of cardiac or respiratory arrest. Basic revival techniques: artificial respiration and heart massage carried out by one or two people. (66995)

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CIS 96-508 First aid (haemorrhages). (Spanish: Primeros auxilios (Hemorragias)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (13min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

In the case of haemorrhage emergencies, rapid first aid action can be decisive. This video shows the way to stem a haemorrhage depending on where it is located, application of a tourniquet and urgent transport of the injured person. (66996)

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CIS 96-509 Occupational first aid - I. Activation of the emergency system (PAS). (Spanish: Socorrismo laboral - I. Activación del sistema de emergencia (PAS)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (10min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In English, Spanish)

Both during leisure time and at work, for one reason or another, situations arise that can lead to accidents. When this happens, the intervention of a first-aid specialist can be vital in saving the life of an accident victim. Sometimes, activating the medical emergency system alone is enough to avoid secondary risks that could produce further victims, or cause further injuries to or worsen the condition of the accident victim. The aim of this video is to give information as to what one should do at the scene of an accident immediately following its occurrence. (67005)

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CIS 96-510 Farmwise: Your guide to health and safety. (Welsh: Ffermio diogel: Eich canllaw i iechyd a diogelwch) Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. iii, 36p. Illus. 45 ref. Price: GBP 3.50., ISBN 0-7176-0839-5 (In Welsh)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0510.pdf

Translation into Welsh of a training booklet originally published in English in 1993 (see CIS 93-1246). It describes in straightforward terms the principles of health and safety on the farm. Contents: compliance with the law; safe use of machines; transport and handling of materials; farm forestry operations; safe use of electricity; guarding against fire and explosion; maintenance work; protective clothing and equipment; child safety; avoiding health problems; livestock hazards; safe use of chemicals; dangers of noise; exposure to dust and fumes; risk assessment; caring for the working environment; accidents and emergencies; legislation. (66725)

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CIS 96-511 Car repair shops. (Spanish: Talleres de reparación de automóviles) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (14min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

Electrical installations, location of tools, transport of heavy components, exhaust fume extraction, etc., are some of the structural measures that need to be worked on in order to avoid occupational accidents. Recommendations to be followed in chassis repair work, mechanical and electrical faults, bodywork, painting, welding and scrapping. (67001)

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CIS 96-512 Electric welding. (Spanish: Soldadura eléctrica) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (17min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In English, Spanish)

Description of coated electrode arc welding and gas-shielded automatic welding systems. Effects stemming from ultraviolet radiation, fumes and gases released during the welding process. Pollutant control systems and description of personal and collective protective gear. (67002)

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CIS 96-513 Oxyacetylene welding and flame cutting. (Spanish: Soldadura oxiacetilénica y oxicorte) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (17min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

Description of the elements forming oxyacetylene and flame-cutting equipment: gas bottles, pressure adjusters, blow torches and rubbers. Assembly process and typical risks involved in this work and the preventive measures that should be observed. (67003)

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CIS 96-514 You're part of the team: Risk assessment in construction. Workcare, Freepost CN 3145, P.O. Box 889, Mitcham, Surrey CR4 4YZ, United Kingdom, no date. Videotape (length: 22min) + trainer's guide. Price: GBP 325.00 + VAT. ### (In English)

This training package shows the role of designers, management and workers in risk assessment at all phases of a construction project. The provisions of relevant legislation, including those of the British Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994 (CIS 95-13), are discussed. (67017)

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CIS 96-515 Safety tips for professional drivers. Scriptographic Publications Ltd., Channing House, Butts Road, Alton, Hants GU34 1ND, United Kingdom, 1993. 15p. Illus. Price: GBP 0.55-0.94 (depending on number of Scriptographic booklets ordered). ### (In English)

Training booklet on safe driving practices: having a positive safety attitude; knowledge of vehicle and driving conditions; using proper judgment; proper driving actions; keeping fit for driving. (66986)

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CIS 96-516 Beverage manufacturing. (Spanish: Fabricación de bebidas) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (16min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

This videotape is concerned with the most common risks in the beverage manufacturing industry: machinery; cuts, both in the upper and lower limbs, due to the glass containers used in the industry; electrical risks; inhalation of carbon dioxide; exposure to noise; reception and despatch of merchandise. It also deals with preventive measures. (67010)

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CIS 96-517 The fish-canning industry. (Spanish: Industrias de conservas de pescado) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (15min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

By going through the different processes and tasks in the canning, semi-preserved and frozen fish industries, the most important working conditions are shown, as are the major hazards arising from the use of machinery and tools, installations, manual handling of loads and ergonomic conditions of the workstations. (67013)

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CIS 96-518 Introduction to professional foodservice. Rande W.L., John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Baffins Lane, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 1UD, United Kingdom, 1996. x, 285p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 25.00., ISBN 0-471-57746-4 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0518.pdf

This training manual provides an introduction to food-service management. Health and safety aspects include: sanitation in food-service operations (legal aspects, role of inspectors, controlling the growth of bacteria, causes of food-borne illness, assessment and control of hazards); safety and cleaning (causes of accidents, safety management programme, responsibilities of employees and management, implementation of a cleaning programme). (66454)

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CIS 96-519 Occupational safety in sewage treatment plants. (French: La sécurité dans les stations d'épuration des eaux usées; German: Sichere Kläranlagen für Abwasser; Italian: Impianti di depurazione acque sicuri) von Däniken F., Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, Arbeitssicherheit, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Mar. 1994. 24p. Illus. (In French, German, Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0519de.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0519it.pdf

Main contents of this training brochure on the sources of mechanical hazards associated with control procedures and construction in sewage treatment plants (the chemical aspects of this type of plant are dealt with in CNA publication ref. 66055 concerning the safety of biogaz installations, CIS 94-1544); general purpose of safety; general requirements relating to technical installations and equipment; safety devices in sewage treatment plants; building components for normal operating procedures; building components for specific operating procedures; complementary information. (66947)

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CIS 96-520 Baker's asthma - Does it have to be?. (French: L'asthme du boulanger - une fatalité?; German: Bäckerasthma - muss das sein?) Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, Arbeitssicherheit, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, 1995. 39p. Illus. 12 ref. (In French, German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0520de.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0520fr.pdf

Contents of this training brochure designed for people working in bakeries and pastry shops: control of dust exposure (behaviour, equipment and machinery, layout, ventilation); screening of applicants (career choice or assignment to a specific location in the plant); diseases due to flour (flour rhinitis, baker's asthma, flour asthma); action the physician can take in case of diseases caused by flour; insurance legislation; list of protective masks, filters for exhaust systems; legal framework in Switzerland. (66948)

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CIS 96-521 Visual display units. (Spanish: Pantallas de visualización de datos) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (8min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

The widespread use of VDUs has led to a change in working conditions. This video looks at factors such as: luminance; workplace lighting, working posture, lack of communication, etc. (67000)

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CIS 96-522 The application of information technology to safety training. Slaven G., Boyle J., Charnley L., Hunt A., Murton B., Health and Safety Executive (HSE), HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. viii, 132p. approx. 80 ref. Price: GBP 30.00., ISBN 0-7176-1073-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0522.pdf

Interviews were conducted with onshore training managers in operating and drilling companies, plus training providers and trainees on current and likely future information technology (IT) products such as computer-based training (CBT) programmes. The survey revealed a heavy reliance on conventional instructor-presented training. Few IT applications were being used with the exception of videos. This situation is changing as 9 of the 15 oil and gas companies surveyed were considering or had purchased a CBT system for permits-to-work training. A majority of trainees that underwent CBT were satisfied with the speed and content of the training they received. In the total sample, of those who had experienced both CBT and conventional training, the majority preferred CBT as a highly effective means of delivering safety-related training. Although CBT is not appropriate for all safety-related topics, its ultimate success depends on a number of factors not all related to the specific technology. Among these: credibility of the system provider, system design, interest and motivation of trainees, and management commitment. (66921)

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CIS 96-523 Work at video display terminals. (French: Le travail à l'écran de visualisation) Lips W., Weickhardt U., Buchberger J., Krueger H., Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, Arbeitssicherheit, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Dec. 1994. 72p. Illus. 13 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0523.pdf

Main contents of this training brochure dealing with work on visual display units: general (ergonomics, lighting, luminance, visual acuity, accommodation, eye movements); components and requirements of work on a visual display unit (screen size, keyboard, mouse, etc.); layout of workplaces with visual display units (lighting of premises, requirements, reflexion, keyboard, desk and seat, etc.); software (coding, communication, interfacing, etc.); medical aspects (radiation, heat, ophthalmological and orthopedic considerations, etc.); psychological aspects and work organization (anxiety, psychosocial stress factors, etc.); checklists (for practical purposes, for the selection of a VDU, for the selection of furniture, etc.); information and counselling; equipment. Replaces the 1991 edition (CIS 91-1825). (66949)

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CIS 96-524 Local exhaust ventilation. (Spanish: Ventilación por extracción localizada) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (12min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In English, Spanish)

Many industrial processes pollute the working environment, producing dust, fog, fumes and vapours that may seriously affect the health of workers. In order to eliminate these harmful products from the working area, it is necessary to install local exhaust systems which collect the pollutant at the source, thus preventing its dispersion. Advice and guidelines are given on the design and installation of these complex systems. (67007)

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CIS 96-525 Health protection during pulverization with spray guns - Two-component polyurethane varnishes. (French: Protection de la santé lors de la pulvérisation au pistolet - Vernis polyuréthane à deux composants; German: Gesundheitsschutz beim Spritzen: Zweikomponenten-Polyurethanlacke) Rossinelli L., Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, 1st ed., Nov. 1995. 7p. Illus. (In French, German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0525.pdf

Practical guide to protective measures during the use of spray guns using two-component polyurethane varnishes. Isocyanate-based hardeners are used for the treatment of this kind of varnish. These hardeners are highly reactive chemicals that can cause serious health damage in the case of exposure. Main points covered: polyurethane varnishes; health hazards; protective measures; observations (in particular, legislation in effect in Switzerland, respecting warning labels, first-aid measures in case of accidental exposure). (66340)

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CIS 96-526 What you should know about the COSHH regulations. Scriptographic Publications Ltd., Channing House, Butts Road, Alton, Hants GU34 1ND, United Kingdom, 1994. 15p. Illus. Price: GBP 0.55-0.94 (depending on number of Scriptographic booklets ordered). ### (In English)

Training booklet on the application in the workplace of the British Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations (CIS 95-19): hazard assessment; control measures; employers' duties; proper use of labels; instruction and training programmes; other protective measures. Test for self assessment. (66982)

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CIS 96-527 Cytostatic drugs (Safe handling during preparation). (Spanish: Fármacos citostáticos (Manejo seguro en la reconstitución)) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (16min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In English, Spanish)

This videotape considers the following aspects concerning the preparation of cytostatic drugs: handling and risks; prevention of contamination of the drug and safety of personnel; work protocols and techniques for hospital centres; required equipment and personal protective gear; newly-developed equipment for increasing safety and simplifying working techniques. (67009)

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CIS 96-528 Isocyanates. (Spanish: Isocianatos) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (9min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

Isocyanates are chemical substances used in many industrial processes. They form the basis for different products: foams, varnishes, paints, resins, flexible and rigid artificial fibres, etc. The products obtained are generically known as polyurethanes. This video shows some of the better-known processes and comments on the risks arising from exposure to isocyanates and the preventive measures for their control. (67012)

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CIS 96-529 Health risks in pesticide formulation facilities. (Spanish: Riesgos para la salud en plantas de formulación de plaguicidas) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, C/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1994. 177p. Illus. 27 ref., ISBN 84-7425-391-8 (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0529.pdf

Training guide to the safe formulation of pesticides. Contents: generalities; types of pesticides (by application, specific effect, acute toxicity, chemical group); health hazards; relevant standards in Spain and the European Communities and exposure limits; formulation of pesticides; study of current conditions in pesticide formulation facilities; results of the study: the questionnaire study, control of hygienic conditions (ventilation, personal protection), final products (active ingredients, toxicological categories, chemical groups, toxicity, pesticidal properties, physical state of the product, labelling, formulation procedures); basic safety procedures. (66659)

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CIS 96-530 Handling pesticides. (Spanish: Manejo de plaguicidas) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (16min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

Contents of this video: definition of pesticides; recommendation for use; how they enter the human organism; transport and storage; preparation and application; what to do in the case of poisoning. (66997)

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CIS 96-531 Use of isocyanates in flexible foam production facilities and their effects on health. (Spanish: Utilización de isocianatos en empresas de espumación flexible y su repercusión sobre la salud) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, C/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 106p. Illus. 37 ref., ISBN 84-7425-380-2 (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0531.pdf

Training guide to the protection of workers against exposure to isocyanates in flexible foam production facilities. Contents: characteristics of toluene diisocyanates (TDIs) (identification, physical and chemical properties); manufacturing of flexible foams using TDIs; criteria of measurement; analysis of the effects of TDIs on the respiratory system; hypothesis and aims of a study on the effects of TDIs; material and methods of the study (population and controls chosen, design, data collection, variables studied); statistical analysis and results of the study; discussion and conclusions; recommendations for prevention of exposure. In annex: medical questionnaire used in the study. (66660)

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CIS 96-532 Risks in the chemical industry. (Spanish: Riesgos en la industria química) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (12min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

General measures designed to prevent occupational hazards and disease. Safety installations and personal and collective protective equipment. (66992)

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CIS 96-533 Poisoning and explosion hazards in motor car repair workshops, garages and car-wash tunnels. (French: Risques d'intoxication et d'explosion dans les ateliers de réparation d'automobiles, dans les garages et dans les tunnels de lavage; German: Vergiftungs- und Explosionsgefahren in Autoreparaturwerkstätten, Autoeinstellräumen und Autowaschstrassen; Italian: Rischi di intossicazione e di esplosione nelle officine di riparazione automobili, nelle autorimesse e nelle corsie di lavaggio automobili) Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, Arbeitssicherheit, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Jan. 1992. No.114, 34p. Illus. Gratis. (In French, German, Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0533.pdf

This booklet (previous version, see CIS 74-1764) deals principally, in its first part, with the poisoning hazards of exhaust gases from running engines (composition of exhaust gases, carbon monoxide toxicology and monitoring, ventilation, etc.). The hazards inherent in cleaning engines and engine parts with soluble oils, petrol or chlorinated hydrocarbons and in operating car-wash tunnels are also discussed. The second part deals with explosion hazards and their causes (ignition of air/petrol mixtures by electrical installations, welding, heating or naked flame). Explosive mixtures are especially liable to accumulate in motor-car repair pits. (66945)

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CIS 96-534 Gas cylinders. (Spanish: Botellas de gases a presión) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (12min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

Videotape on the safe handling of gas cylinders. (67011)

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CIS 96-535 Hazard identification and risk assessment. Wells G., Institution of Chemical Engineers, Davis Building, 165-189 Railway Terrace, Rugby, Warwickshire CV21 3HQ, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 302p. Illus. 21 ref. Index., ISBN 0-85295-353-4 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0535.pdf

This manual describes ways of carrying out hazard analysis in the process industries, with reference to the way in which major incidents develop. Contents: introduction to hazards and risk; concept hazard analysis; preliminary process hazard analysis; critical examination of system safety; hazard and operability studies (Hazop); fault tree analysis; task analysis and human factors; task analysis and hazard identification; risk criteria; risk assessment. In appendices; development of piping and instrumentation diagrams; Hazcheck listing; example of a Hazop study. (66672)

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CIS 96-536 About electrical safety at work. Scriptographic Publications Ltd., Channing House, Butts Road, Alton, Hants GU34 1ND, United Kingdom, 1994. 15p. Illus. Price: GBP 0.55-0.94 (depending on number of Scriptographic booklets ordered). ### (In English)

Training booklet on electrical safety, including the prevention of fires due to electrical faults. Test for self assessment. (66981)

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CIS 96-537 Electrical risks. (Spanish: Riesgos eléctricos) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (19min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

General regulations for the prevention of accidents when using electric power. Description of protected installations and safety systems and components, with examples from laboratories. (66993)

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CIS 96-538 Noise. (Spanish: El ruido) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (16min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

Noise as an aggressive and polluting agent in everyday life: characteristics; propagation; levels and frequencies; occupational hearing loss; preventive measures to avoid or reduce the harmful effects of noise on the human organism. (66998)

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CIS 96-539 Transportation of irradiation equipment for non-destructive testing. (French: Transport d'unités d'irradiation pour les essais non destructifs; German: Transport von Bestrahlungseinheiten für die zerstörungsfreie Prüfung) Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, Arbeitssicherheit, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Mar. 1992. 20p. Illus. (In French, German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0539.pdf

This training brochure provides details on the transportation of irradiation equipment as used for non-destructive material testing. It summarizes the major safety measures that ought to be taken by people in charge of these operations in Switzerland. (66946)

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CIS 96-540 The danger zone: Mechanical handling in construction. Workcare, Freepost CN 3145, P.O. Box 889, Mitcham, Surrey CR4 4YZ, United Kingdom, no date. Videotape (length: 22min) + trainer's guide. Price: GBP 345.00 + VAT. ### (In English)

This training package shows the principles of safe mechanical handling on construction sites. (67016)

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CIS 96-541 Manual handling of loads. (Spanish: Manejo manual de cargas) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (13min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In English, Spanish)

This video shows different factors that could entail a risk in the manual handling of loads, such as the characteristics of the load, the necessary physical effort, the demands of the job, characteristics of the working environment and personal risk factors. All these factors must be borne in mind when evaluating workplaces involving manual handling of loads. Preventive measures are proposed in order of priority, starting with proper design of the workplace which either avoid the manual handling of loads or which render this a hazard-free activity. A series of practical tips are given on how to lift any load. (67006)

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CIS 96-542 Moving people safely. Scriptographic Publications Ltd., Channing House, Butts Road, Alton, Hants GU34 1ND, United Kingdom, 1995. 15p. Illus. Price: GBP 0.55-0.94 (depending on number of Scriptographic booklets ordered). ### (In English)

Training booklet on the safe movement of people in the health-care professions. Test for self assessment. (66983)

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CIS 96-543 About using hoists. Scriptographic Publications Ltd., Channing House, Butts Road, Alton, Hants GU34 1ND, United Kingdom, 1995. 15p. Illus. Price: GBP 0.55-0.94 (depending on number of Scriptographic booklets ordered). ### (In English)

Training booklet on the safe use of hoists for the movement of patients. Test for self assessment. (66984)

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CIS 96-544 Prevention of back pain in nursing. (Spanish: Prevención del dolor de espalda en el cuidado de enfermos) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (13min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In English, Spanish)

This videotape provides an overview of the essential movements in nursing work and in particular, of the moving and transporting of patients. The knowledge gained will prevent the nurse from developing back pain, allowing him or her to economize on effort, be more self-sufficient and have greater work capacity. (67004)

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CIS 96-545 About shiftwork safety and health. Scriptographic Publications Ltd., Channing House, Butts Road, Alton, Hants GU34 1ND, United Kingdom, 1992. 15p. Illus. Price: GBP 0.55-0.94 (depending on number of Scriptographic booklets ordered). ### (In English)

Training booklet on the safety and health aspects of shiftwork: adjustment to different biological rhythms; getting enough sleep; avoidance of stimulants or sleeping pills; safety consciousness; sensible working practices; proper eating habits; safe commuting (driving or using public transportation); importance of social life. (66985)

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CIS 96-546 Safety signs. (Spanish: Señalización) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (16min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In Spanish)

Factors determining the effectiveness of adequate safety signs. Optical, acoustic, olfactory and tactile stimuli are combined for fast and easy understanding of the message. (66999)

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CIS 96-547 Human error. (Portuguese: O erro humano) Faria M.G.L., Instituto de Desenvolvimento e Inspecção das Condições de Trabalho, Pr. de Alvalade 1, 1700 Lisboa, Portugal, 1994. 23p. 5 ref., ISBN 972-704-124-8 (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0547.pdf

Introductory manual on the role of human error in accident causation. It covers: definition of human error; causes of human error; error analysis; classification of human errors (errors of omission, execution, derivation, sequence and lateness; other classificatory schemes); management and neutralization of errors. (66652)

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CIS 96-548 Stress at work: Causes, effects and prevention - A guide for small and medium sized enterprises. Kompier M., Levi L., European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions, Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, 1994. 72p. 21 ref. Price: ECU 8.50., ISBN 92-826-8594-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0548.pdf

Guide to occupational stress in small and medium-sized enterprises within the European Union. It may be suitable for the training of management staff and workers' representatives in the way stress-related problems are treated. Contents: definition of stress; vulnerable portions of the workforce; reasons for stress monitoring; instruments for stress monitoring at the enterprise level; stress prevention at work. In appendices: checklists and questionnaires. (66730)

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CIS 96-549 On one hand. On the other hand. Everything you need to know on alcohol and other addictive substances in the workplace. (French: D'une part. D'autre part: Tout ce qu'il faut savoir sur l'alcool et les autres substances engendrant la dépendance au poste de travail; German: Einerseits. Andererseits. Klartext über Alkohol und andere Suchtmittel am Arbeitsplatz; Italian: Da una parte. D'altra parte. Tutto quello che si deve sapere sull'alcol e sulle sostanze che generano dipendenza nel posto di lavoro) Institut suisse de prévention de l'alcoolisme et autres toxicomanies, Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, Arbeitssicherheit, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Oct. 1993. 4p. Illus. (In French, German, Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0549.pdf

Training brochure designed to increase awareness of addictive behaviour in the workplace. Main contents: addictive substances and their effects; occupational risks associated with addiction; too much is too much; no gossiping, let's talk openly about it; help rather than rejection. Appendices: 12 illustrative posters in A4, A3 and B4 format: "12 good reasons to stop drinking as of today". (66942)

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CIS 96-550 Integrate rather than exclude. Alcohol and other addictive substances in the workplace. (French: Intégrer plutôt qu'exclure. Alcool et autres substances engendrant la dépendance au poste de travail; German: Eingrenzen statt ausgrenzen. Alkohol und andere Suchtmittel am Arbeitsplatz; Italian: Integrare invece di emarginare, Alcol e altre sostanze che generano dipendenza sul posto di lavoro) Institut suisse de prévention de l'alcoolisme et autres toxicomanies, Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt, Arbeitssicherheit, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Oct. 1993. 20p. Illus. 4 ref. (In French, German, Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0550.pdf

Main contents of this training brochure on the management and prevention of addictive behaviour in the workplace: basic information: why do people turn their backs when addictive substances are being discussed; substances concerned and their effects; accidents and absences; legislative aspects in Switzerland; how much is too much, potential remedial measures: what to do to deal with the situation; prevention programmes in enterprises; useful addresses. (66943)

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CIS 96-551 Psychosocial factors at work and their relationship to health. (Spanish: Los factores psicosociales en el trabajo y su relación con la salud) Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, ediciones y Publicaciones, C/ Torrelaguna, 73-28027 Madrid, Spain. PAL videotape (13min). Price: ESP 3000 + VAT. ### (In English, Spanish)

In order to improve working conditions it is necessary to take account of psychosocial factors, which can jeopardize the health of workers and, therefore, the company's output. This video aims to give an overview on how, by means of adequate organizational policy and the setting up of appropriate information channels, one can facilitate communication with and participation of workers in order to substantially reduce risks. (67008)

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[ Top of page ]

Periodicals, books, databases, audiovisuals


001 General safety, health and conditions of work

CIS 96-552 Occupational hazards in the construction industry. Statistics. (French: Les risques professionnels dans le BTP. Statistiques) Travail et sécurité, Sep. 1995, No. 540, p.480-483. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0552.pdf

Extracts from the occupational accident and disease statistics for 1992 collected in France. Tables show the distribution of accidents by frequency, severity, age of victim, site of injury and principal causes. The number of lost-work-time accidents has dropped, as have the severity index and the number of deaths. Construction industry workers represent one case of occupational disease in four. Figures are given for the principal causes, consequences and costs of occupational diseases. (66305)

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CIS 96-553 Safety monitors. (French: Les contrôleurs de sécurité) Ferrier V., Travail et sécurité, Nov. 1995, No. 542, p.580-590. Illus (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0553.pdf

Description via examples of the three principal missions of the safety monitor (contrôleur de sécurité), who has the central role in matters of safety in French enterprises: monitoring safety conditions, providing advice and supplying safety training. (66307)

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CIS 96-554 Accident investigation and analysis: How to discover the how and why of accidents. (French: L'enquête et l'analyse des accidents - Découvrir le comment et le pourquoi des accidents) Bigaouette M., Objectif prévention, 1995, Vol.18, No.1, p.11-25. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0554.pdf

This article surveys the questions to be covered after an accident in order to identify its causes. In particular, it deals with the steps to take during accident investigation and analysis (AIA), with the standardization of accident analysis and with accidental occurrences (other than accidents) that should also be investigated. Individual articles deal with: occurrences that should be subject to AIA; investigative steps during accident analysis; detailed accident investigation; ways to understand how successive "normal" events can result in an accident. (66691)

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CIS 96-555 Communication of risk information to workers and managers: Do industrial hygienists differ in their communication techniques?. McMahan S., Meyer J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.186-190. 13 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0555.pdf

A survey of 138 industrial hygienists in California, USA, highlighted differences in the methods used to communicate occupational health risks to workers and to managers. Simplified language and media were used for workers and scientific language and media for managers. Hygienists with more experience in their field and those who had attended risk communication workshops were more effective when communicating risks to workers. Components used in the risk communication process are discussed along with the influence of organizational and attitudinal factors on this process. (66779)

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CIS 96-556 Project of a system for the reporting of occupational data on the health monitoring of workers exposed to lead, asbestos and noise (Decree 277/91, art. 4-21-35-49). (Italian: Schema progettuale di sistema informativo per la registrazione dei dati inerenti i levelli di esposizione e la sorveglianza sanitaria dei lavoratori esposti a piombo, amianto e rumore (D.Leg 277/91, artt. 4-21-35-49)) Scarselli R., Nesti M., Perticaroli S., Marconi M., Benvenuti F., Azzaretto E., Camillucci L., Fogli d'informazione ISPESL, Jan.-Mar. 1994, Vol.7, No.1 (Supplement), p.1-64. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0556.pdf

The Italian Superior Institute for Prevention and Work Safety (ISPESL) describes in this study a project for data collection on the health monitoring of workers exposed to lead, asbestos and noise. Appropriate questionnaires for risk assessment have been devised and are described. This is being performed because of the requirements of Italian Decree 277/91 (CIS 93-1404). The target is to build up an Italian national registry like those already existing in Finland, the US and the UK. (66930)

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CIS 96-557 Success or fictitious effects?. (German: Erfolge oder Scheineffekte?) Lenz R.R., Sicherheitsingenieur, Oct. 1995, Vol.26, No.10, p.32-38. Illus. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0557.pdf

The effects of nine different films to promote the use of safety gloves, safety spectacles and safety shoes on more than 2,000 employees were determined. The films used different approaches to get the message across: they informed, appealed to emotions and stressed the benefits of remaining healthy and uninjured. The films were presented in two ways: they were shown continuously at a location which was frequently passed by employees or they were presented formally in a classroom. The films did increase the use of personal protective equipment. The extent of the increase depended on the approach and presentation. (66858)

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CIS 96-558 Sectoral statistics 1993. A drop in occupational accidents. (French: Les statistiques technologiques 1993. Recul des accidents du travail) Travail et sécurité, Nov. 1995, No. 542, p.591-597. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0558.pdf

Sectoral statistics show a sharp drop in the number of occupational accidents in France from 1992 to 1993 in terms of lost-work-time accidents (-9.9%), serious accidents (-14.4%) and fatal accidents (-16.5%). Tables showing the evolution from 1992 to 1993 of on-the-job, commuting and fatal accidents and certain occupational diseases are presented with commentaries; fatality data from earlier years are also given. Graphs show the frequency of lost-work-time accidents, degree of temporary and permanent disability and frequency of permanent disability. The distribution of 1993 accidents by sector is also shown. (66308)

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CIS 96-559 Survey of working conditions in 1994 - Activities of the High Council for the Prevention of Occupational Risks. Priority actions for the prevention of occupational hazards. 1995 Programme. (French: Bilan des conditions de travail 1994. Activité du Conseil supérieur de la prévention des risques professionnels. Actions prioritaires en matière de prévention des risques professionnels. Programme 95) Ministère du Travail (France), Documents pour le médecin du travail, 1st Quarter 1995, No.61, p.25-35 and p.37-39. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0559.pdf

This document reproduces excerpts from the chapter "Examination of working conditions 1994" of the Annual Report of the French Higher Council for the Prevention of Occupational Risks devoted to the Council's activities in occupational medicine. Work carried out by various committees in 1994 is presented, followed by an overview of its general policies (prevention of risks in the construction industry, prevention of risks related to manual handling, prevention of risks of exposure to asbestos) and of the action programme for 1995 (work equipment, protection of workers in precarious employment, industrial medicine). (66693)

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CIS 96-560 Communication of national legislation transposing the Community Directives relating to the health and safety of workers at work: The situation to date. Janus, 1995, Vol.III, No.21, p.28. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0560.pdf

Tabular presentation of the status of transposition of 18 OSH-related European Community Directives into the national legislation of 15 Member States, as of 7 Dec. 1995. The highest level of adoption was that by the Netherlands (17 Directives adopted), while the lowest was that by Spain (4 adopted). (66722)

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CIS 96-561 Occupational and environmental health policy: The sanitary inspection in the conditions of social and economic transformation in Poland. Skowrońska R., Dawydzik L.T., International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, 1994, Vol.7, No.3, p.221-224. Illus. ### (In English)

State of medical labour inspection in Poland in recent years, taking into consideration the emergence of many small privately-owned companies. (67060)

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CIS 96-562 A classification scheme for aggregating U.S. census occupation and industry codes. Schnitzer P.G., Teschke K., Olshan A.F., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.185-191. 3 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0562.pdf

An occupational classification scheme was developed for use in a study of paternal occupation and risk of birth defects. The scheme aggregates workers into 56 occupational categories according to work activities and potential exposures. The categories are listed along with the U.S. occupation and industry codes included in each group. The strategy, based on a similar scheme developed in Canada, may be used in studies of the health effects of occupations. The limitations of the scheme are discussed. (66503)

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CIS 96-563 Effect of recall period on the reporting of occupational injuries among older workers in the Health and Retirement Study. Zwerling C., Sprince N.L., Wallace R.B., Davis C.S., Whitten P.S., Heeringa S.G., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Nov. 1995, Vol.28, No.5, p.583-590. Illus. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0563.pdf

Data on occupational injuries were analyzed for 7,049 subjects aged 51-61 years selected from a 1992 study on health and retirement which used a one-year recall period. A model of occupational injury rate as a function of time before the interview was developed. Based on a four-week recall period, the adjusted occupational injury rate was 36% higher than the rate based on a one-year recall period. Adjustment for recall period had less effect on the rate ratios of these injuries for nine risk factors studied. Results suggest that self-reported surveys with longer recall periods may be used to estimate occupational injury rates. (66668)

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CIS 96-564 Research needs for health and safety of workers during decommissioning and removal of fixed offshore installations. Street R., Mirzoeff J., Health and Safety Executive, Offshore Technology Report, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. iv, 61p. 49 ref. Price: GBP 15.00., ISBN 0-7176-1039-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0564.pdf

A study was carried out to identify research needs in connection with the safe abandonment (decommissioning and removal) of fixed offshore installations in the UK sector of the West European Continental Shelf. The report concludes that as there is insufficient experience of the removal of large structures relevant to this area of the North Sea, some additional research into safety aspects is needed. Recommendations on research needs are presented in the areas of: explosives and other cutting methods; lifting; toppling; concrete and other gravity-based structures; remote handling; phased abandonment; management. (66370)

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CIS 96-565 25 years ISSA Section Chemistry. (French: 25 ans AISS Comité Chimie; Spanish: 25 años del Comité de Química de la AISS) International Social Security Association (ISSA), International Section for the Prevention of Occupational Risks in the Chemical Industry, Kurfürsten Anlage 62, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany, 1995. 79p. Illus. ### (In English, French, German, Spanish)

Main contents of this brochure published on the 25th anniversary of the foundation of the International Section of the ISSA for the Prevention of Occupational Risks due to electricity: structure of the ISSA; the Section Chemistry; Employment Accident Insurance Fund for the Chemical Industry; Swiss National Accident Insurance Fund; French National Research and Safety Institute; the history of Section Chemistry; tasks of the Chemistry Section; "permanent committees"; Standing Orders; members of the Section; permanent working groups; members of the Bureau; events of the Section; brochures of the Section; the ISSA sections. (67025)

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CIS 96-566 What every manager needs to know about health and safety. Akass R., Gower Publishing Ltd, Gower House, Croft Road, Aldershot, Hampshire, GU11 3HR, United Kingdom, 1994. xv, 272p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 16.95., ISBN 0-566-07734-5 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0566.pdf

This manual provides guidance on the main statutory health and safety requirements in the United Kingdom and the European Union. Contents: the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (see CIS 74-2099); organizing for health and safety; company safety policy; health and safety monitoring; inspection, prosecution and sanctions; safety representatives and safety committees; contractors; health and safety training; accident reporting; Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1989 (COSHH, CIS 89-1092); fire precautions; first aid; regulations giving effect to European Union directives concerning health and safety management, display screen equipment, workplace health, safety and welfare, manual handling operations, personal protective equipment, provision and use of work equipment, and the construction industry. (66464)

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CIS 96-567 How occupational accidents and diseases are reported in the European Community. (French: La déclaration des accidents du travail et des maladies professionnelles dans les pays de la Communauté européenne) Clarke R., Glendon I., European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions, Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, 1988. 51p. Illus. 19 ref. Price: ECU 4.60., ISBN 92-825-7575-6 (En), ISBN 92-825-7576-4 (fr) (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0567en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0567fr.pdf

Survey of the reporting systems used for occupational accidents and diseases in the 12 countries that formed the European Community in 1988: Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany (Fed.Rep. only), Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, United Kingdom. The following aspects of reporting are covered: use of statistics; accident reporting (which accidents have to be reported, to whom and how, recording and analysis of data); reporting of occupational diseases (which diseases need to be reported, reporting procedures, under-reporting); specific examples (fatal accidents, falls from heights, occupational deafness, asbestos-related diseases); harmonization of reporting procedures within the community. In addition to English and French, this document is also available in Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. (66729)

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CIS 96-568 Trade union training in health and safety - A survey of European practice in training for workers' representatives. Raulie A., Walters D., European Trade Union Technical Bureau for Health and Safety, Bd. Emile Jacqmain 155, 1210 Brussels, Nov. 1995. 147p. Bibl.ref. Price: BEF 800.00., ISBN 2-930003-16-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0568.pdf

This study summarizes the findings of a European survey of trade union health and safety training provision. National reports are presented for Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Aspects covered include: trade union health and safety policy; organization of trade union health and safety training; content and structure of training; training objectives; workers' representation in health and safety; standards; evaluation and follow-up. Case-studies of training schemes are included. Response to the survey showed that training in health at work issues was a priority concern of many trade union organizations. (66782)

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CIS 96-569 An investigative approach to industrial hygiene: Sleuth at work. Levin L., Van Nostrand Reinhold, 115 Fifth Ave., New York NY 10003, USA; Chapman & Hall, 2-6 Boundary Row, London SE1 8HN, United Kingdom, 1996. xiii, 274p. Illus. Index. Price (in Europe): GBP 29.95., ISBN 0-442-01925-4 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0569.pdf

This monograph constitutes an anecdotal and investigative approach to industrial hygiene, particularly as practised in the US. Contents: evolution of the profession (early history, chimney sweeps and the conquest of communicable diseases, the struggle for a safe and healthy workplace, the legal framework and current trends); 12 detailed case studies illustrating the painstaking detective work needed in many cases in order to diagnose the true source of industrial hygiene problems; the special case of workers who willingly assume greater than normal risks in the course of practising their profession (cosmetologists and firefighters). (66390)

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CIS 96-570 The regulation of health and safety in five European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy - with a supplement on recent developments in the Netherlands. Martin A.B., Linehan A.J., Whitehouse I., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. iv, 279p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Price: GBP 60.00., ISBN 0-7176-1013-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0570.pdf

This report examines in detail the health and safety organization, including legislation and its implementation, in five Member States of the European Union (Denmark, France, Germany, Spain and Italy), with a special supplement on recent developments in a sixth (the Netherlands). Certain related issues (employment conditions, environmental control, shipping) are also covered in some cases. Topics covered under country headings (where relevant): the institutional framework (national or regional), legislation, the social partners, workmen's compensation, labour inspection, OSH research institutes, the working environment, occupational health services, environmental control, special industrial areas (offshore installations, mining, agriculture, transportation, nuclear safety). Annexes for each country cover: structure of organizations participating in OSH matters; statistical summaries on occupational accidents and diseases; list of people interviewed for the report. (66397)

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CIS 96-571 Improved coverage and relevance of national occupational health and safety surveillance in Australia. Macaskill P., Mandryk J., Leigh J., National Occupational Health and Safety Commission (Worksafe Australia), Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia, Aug. 1995. vi, 73p. 99 ref., ISBN 0-642-24426-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0571.pdf

This report describes the current procedures used in Australia for occupational health and safety surveillance by means of data collection and analysis. Major current and proposed data sources are described along with methods for obtaining estimates of the extent of occupational disorders. Strategies for making more effective use of the available data are outlined. Recommendations are made concerning the use of Worksafe Australia's National Data Set for Compensation-based Statistics, developing additional data sources and the dissemination of surveillance results. (66479)

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CIS 96-572 Understanding New South Wales occupational health and safety legislation. Marks F., CCH Australia Ltd., Cnr Talavera & Khartoum Roads, P.O. Box 230, North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia, 2nd ed., July 1994. viii, 192p. Index. Price: AUD 55.00., ISBN 1-86264-635-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0572.pdf

This manual provides the text of and comment on the New South Wales Occupational Health and Safety Act 1983 (CIS 90-1407) and Regulations made under it (CIS 92-710 et al.). Topics covered: general provisions relating to health, safety and welfare at work (duties of employers, the self-employed, manufacturers and others, health and safety committees, notification of accidents and other matters, appointment and powers of inspectors); associated health and safety legislation concerning factories, shops and industries, construction safety, mining, dangerous goods, rural workers accommodation; formulation of industry codes of practice and regulations; procedure for offences against the Act. A number of judicial decisions are included. (66767)

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CIS 96-573 Labour administration in the People's Republic of China. Ministry of Labour, 12 He Ping Li Zhongjie, Beijing 100716, China, 1993. 90p. Illus. (In Chinese, English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0573.pdf

This report describes the role and functions of the Chinese Ministry of Labour in the areas of: regulation and control; developing vocational skills; labour relations; social security; labour safety and health (elaborating policies, laws, regulations and technical standards, system of labour inspection); international cooperation and exchange; labour science research; and development of information systems. (66980)

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CIS 96-574 Occupational health and safety: The experience according to age, Australia, 1992-93. Williams T., National Occupational Health and Safety Commission (Worksafe Australia), Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia, Nov. 1995. xviii, 96p. Illus. 5 ref., ISBN 0-644-45160-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0574.pdf

Workers' compensation data for 1992-93 are analyzed by industry, occupation, type of occurrence, duration of absence and cost for 5-year age groups. The 55 years and over group had the highest injury or disease incidence and frequency rates of all age groups. In terms of incidence rates, the most hazardous industries were agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting (15-24 and 25-34 year olds), mining (35-44 and 45-54), and construction (55 and over). Most hazardous occupations were labourers and related workers (15-24, 25-34 and 35-44 year olds), and plant and machine operators (45-54 and 55 and over). The most frequent injury category for all groups was sprains and strains. (66374)

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CIS 96-575 Strategy for the improvement of occupational safety and health and working conditions in Indonesia. ILO Publications, International Labour Office, 1211 Genève 22, Switzerland, 1995. xlii, 129p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0575.pdf

Report of an ILO advisory mission and proceedings of a national workshop held in Jakarta, 16-17 May 1995. The ILO report reviews the current status of occupational safety and health and working conditions in Indonesia and presents a programme of action for improving workers' welfare. The proposed strategy is based on: upgrading and effective enforcement of legislation; training, information and research; strengthening employers' and workers' organizations; and improving protection for the most vulnerable workers. Documents from the national workshop are included. Summary and recommendations in Indonesian. (66530)

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CIS 96-576 The comprehensive guide to work injury management. Isernhagen S.J., Aspen Publishers, Inc., 7201 McKinney Circle, Frederick, MD 21701, USA, 1995. xxxii, 821p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: USD 95.00., ISBN 0-8342-0558-0 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0576.pdf

This manual is in three parts. Part I - work injury prevention: ergonomics; role of the safety director; job analysis; prework screening; education on the control of back problems; establishing an industrial prevention programme; measurement and surveillance of carpal tunnel syndrome; industrial rehabilitation and the hand specialist. Part II - work injury management: on-site medical care and physical therapy impact; treatment for low back pain; returning injured workers to work; functional capacity evaluation; work rehabilitation. Part III - administrative concerns: developing occupational medicine programmes and systems; occupational health and rehabilitation programmes; risk management consulting; managed care and workers' compensation. (66667)

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CIS 96-577 Report on activities - 1996 edition. (Dutch: Activiteitenverslag; French: Rapport d'activités. Edition 1996) Nationale vereniging tot voorkoming van arbeidsongevallen (NVVA), Gachardstraat 88, Bus 4, 1050 Brussel, Belgium, 1996. 24p. Illus. (In Dutch, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0577.pdf

The first chapter is devoted to an analysis of the statistical trends of the number (slightly decreasing) and costs (increasing) of registered occupational accidents over the period 1989-1994. A table gives the frequency and severity rates by major industry. The second chapter reviews Belgian safety and health policies pursued in 1995. The activities of ANPAT are described under the following headings: service information and documentation, publications, audiovisuals, studies and consultancy, training, financial resources of ANPAT, organization chart. (66688)

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CIS 96-578 Comparative assessment of advanced techniques for the evaluation of confidence levels in calculated safety margins. Mitchell B.H., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 69p. 22 ref. Price: GBP 15.00., ISBN 0-7176-1100-0 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0578.pdf

This report presents an evaluation of a mathematical technique known as the FORM/SORM method, used to quantify the confidence that a user may have in predictions of safety margins. The mathematical basis and areas of potential application of the method are reviewed and its performance in terms of speed, accuracy, reliability and generality is assessed in comparison with the Monte-Carlo technique. The assessment was carried out on five test problems including a numerical simulation of a hydrocarbon jet fire. It is concluded that the FORM/SORM method is sufficiently robust and efficient to be considered for use on a routine basis. (66789)

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CIS 96-579 Health as productive potential - Occupational safety and health promotion in the context of social and corporate change. (German: Gesundheit als produktives Potential - Arbeitsschutz und Gesundheitsförderung im gesellschaftlichen und betrieblichen Strukturwandel) Marstedt G., Mergner U., Edition Sigma, Karl-Marx-Strasse 17, 12043 Berlin, Germany, 1995. 208p. 145 ref. Price: DEM 24.80., ISBN 3-89404-393-8 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0579.pdf

Subjects covered: calculating the cost of accidents to society in general and to the individual company; cost-benefit analyses of safety programmes; present-day changes in enterprises, such as the increase in the number of women workers, highly educated employees and employees over 50yrs of age in the workforce, the use of new technologies such as computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing and of management strategies such as lean production and team work and the impact on safety and health; safety and health problems in small and medium-sized enterprises. (66860)

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CIS 96-580 Recognition and evaluation of hazards at work. (German: Erkennen und Beurteilen von Gefährdungen bei der Arbeit) Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz, Wirtschaftsverlag NW, Postfach 10 11 10, 27511 Bremerhaven, Germany, 1993. 275p. Illus. Bibl.ref., ISBN 3-89429-336-5 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0580.pdf

Proceedings of a symposium on the analysis of hazards encountered at work in Dortmund, Germany, on 23 and 24 March 1993. The papers presented at this conference addressed the following subjects: EC directives on occupational safety and conversion into German law; methods of hazard analysis; analysis of hazards which lead to occupational diseases using highway construction as an example; analysis of accident hazards within the construction industry, the production of gear boxes and the work of an engineer who has to design safe equipment; analysis of hazards in plants such as steelworks. (66906)

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CIS 96-581 Annual report 1994 of the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions, Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2985 Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, 1995. x, 39 p. Price: ECU 7.00. ###, ISBN 92-827-4402-7 (In English)

This report provides an overview of the Foundation's activities in 1994. Project reference numbers are quoted to enable readers to consult further details in a separate supplement (WP/95/54/EN) which is available on request from the Foundation. Major projects related to OSH: the European Health and Safety Database (HASTE); European Survey on the working environment; the European working environment in figures; workplace assessment; European networks of product registers and registers of exposure; identification and assessment of occupational health strategies in Europe; assessing the benefits of stress prevention; ill-health and workplace absenteeism: initiatives for prevention; economic incentive models to improve the working environment in Europe; design for health; design for integration. (67024)

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CIS 96-582 25 years ISSA Electricity Section. (French: 25 ans Comité AISS Electricité; Spanish: 25 años del Comité de Electricidad de la AISS) International Social Security Association (ISSA), International Section for the Prevention of Occupational Risks due to Electricity, Berufsgenossenschaft der Feinmechanik und Elektrotechnik, Gustav-Heinemann-Ufer 130, 50968 Köln, Germany, 1995. 47p. Illus. ### (In English, French, German, Spanish)

Main contents of this brochure issued on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the ISSA Electricity Section: the work of the Electricity Section of the ISSA (1970-1995); results of the Section's work (accident statistics; focal accident points; hazard limits of electricity; thermal hazards; cardiological problems due to electrical accidents; long-term consequences of electrical accidents; first aid; current-operated earth leakage circuit breakers; biological effects of electromagnetic fields; laser beams; ionizing radiation; basic and advanced training; occupational safety films; training programme in Kenya; international standardization. (67026)

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CIS 96-583 Area site protection and detection. (French: Protection et détection périphériques des sites) CNPP, La Médiathèque du Risque, 5, rue Daunou, 75002 Paris, France, June 1994. 116p. Price: FRF 265.00. ### (In French)

Main issues dealt with at this meeting on area protection and detection in premises held in June 1994: relevance of area protection and detection; artificial and natural barriers; sensitive electrified fences, ground cables, pressure detectors; non-material, infrared, very-high-frequency, laser barriers; video surveillance; use of external detection devices; physical defences of sites; design of specifications by the user; built-in area protection and detection devices; treatment and use of information generated by internal systems (safety personal computer) or remote control systems (remote surveillance). (67028)

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CIS 96-584 Preliminary analysis of safety management: Evaluation survey. (Spanish: Análisis preliminar de la gestión preventiva: cuestionarios de evaluación) Bestratén Belloví M., Gil Fisa A., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 10p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0584.pdf

This information note presents a questionnaire survey for auditing safety management in enterprises. The areas analyzed are: role of management, safety planning, prevention professionals, workers' participation, training, information and basic preventive activities (accident statistics, accident investigation, risk analysis, emergency plan, personal protection). (66718)

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CIS 96-585 Signpost to the Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Feb. 1996. 8p. Illus. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0585.pdf

This leaflet provides brief guidance on the requirements of the Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations (see CIS 96-392) which bring into force the EC Safety Signs Directive (92/58/EEC). Guidance is given on types of signs and when they are required, when existing signs need to be changed, duties of employers, fire safety signs and fire warning systems. Examples of commonly used signs are included. (66761)

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CIS 96-586 Guideline on the involvement of industrial physicians and other safety specialists. (French: Directive relative à l'appel à des médecins du travail et autres spécialistes de la sécurité au travail; German: Richtlinie über den Beizug von Arbeitsärzten und anderen Spezialisten der Arbeitssicherheit; Italian: Direttiva concernente l'appello ai medici del lavoro e agli altri specialisti della sicurezza sul lavoro) Eidgenössische Koordinationskommission für Arbeitssicherheit (EKAS), Richtlinienbüro, Fluhmattstrasse 1, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Aug. 1995. 23p. (In French, German, Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0586.pdf

This directive on the role of occupational physicians and safety specialists in Switzerland explains how enterprises, while discharging their own duties, may involve occupational physicians and other safety specialists depending on the situation of the enterprise, its size, potential hazards and specific knowledge required. This process applies also for groups of enterprises and various industries. (66944)

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CIS 96-587 Practical safety data sheet. Personal hygiene products in the work environment. (French: Fiche pratique de sécurité. Produits d'hygiène corporelle en milieu de travail) Pringalle C., Travail et sécurité, Dec. 1995, No.543, p.685-688. Illus. 4 ref. Also available as an offprint from the INRS. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0587.pdf

This data sheet presents the characteristics and conditions of use of the personal hygiene products that are most often used in the workplace (skin cleansers, soaps, handwashing detergents, antiseptics, protective creams), as well as ways of drying the hands after washing. (66952)

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CIS 96-588 Legislation in practice - 7. Risk evaluation. (Dutch: Wetgeving in de praktijk: 7. Risico-evaluatie; French: Législation en pratique - 7. Evaluation du risque) De Greef M., De Gruyter R., Gebruers B., Heselmans M., Jacobs H., Van den Broek K., Eede Vanden R., Van der Steen M., Nationale verenining tot voorkoming van arbeidsongevallen (NVVA), Gachardstraat 88, Bus 4, 1050 Brussel, Belgium, 1995. 22p. 20 ref., ISBN 2-87112-036-6 (fr), ISBN 90-70902-36-2 (nl) (In Dutch, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0588.pdf

This booklet contains recommendations to Belgian enterprises as to how to implement legislation concerning risk evaluation. Main topics covered: relevant European (89/391/EEC) and Belgian legislation (table presenting correspondences); practical implementation (generalities, a five-stage approach to risk evaluation). In annex: examples of potential hazards (work equipment, work habits, electricity, chemical hazards etc.); sample risk evaluation check list; survey of the main techniques used for hazard identification (safety audits, FMEA (Failure Mode and Effect Analysis), HAZOP (Hazard and Operability Study), What-if, SWIFT (Structured What If Technique), Quantified Risk Assessment, TOR (Technique of Operations Review), Human Reliability Analysis, fault-tree analysis, MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), STEP (Sequentially Timed Events Plotting)). (66339)

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CIS 96-589 Legislation in practice - 8. The health and safety committee: Its role in prevention policy. (Dutch: Wetgeving in de praktijk - 8. Comité VGV: rol in het preventiebeleid; French: Législation en pratique - 8. Comité SHE: rôle dans la politique de prévention) Nationale vereniging tot voorkoming van arbeidsongevallen (NVVA), Gachardstraat 88, Bus 4, 1050 Brussel, Belgium, 1996. 23p. 16 ref., ISBN 2-87112-040-4 (fr), ISBN 90-70902-39-7 (nld) (In Dutch, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0589.pdf

This booklet provides Belgian enterprises with practical information as to how to implement legislation concerning the safety and health committee. The role of the committee is described with regards to the control of the hazard, the determination of the types of hazards, their evaluation and the setting up of measures to apply on a short, medium and long term basis, and the appraisal of their effects. Other requirements that the committee has to meet concerning information, cooperation with the occupational physicist, with the safety inspection and other safety experts or bodies are dealt with in detail. A separate chapter is devoted to its operation. Annexes: follow-up of the agenda items of a comittee's annual programme; summary of the legal provisions applying in Belgium to safety and health committees. (66684)

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CIS 96-590 International code of ethics for occupational health professionals. (Portuguese: Código Internacional de ética para os Profissionais de Saúde Ocupacional) International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH), Instituto de Desenvolvimento e Inspecção das Condições de Trabalho, Pr. de Alvalade 1, 1700 Lisboa, Portugal, 1995. 42p. + poster. 15 ref., ISBN 972-8321-00-7 (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0590.pdf

Translation into Portuguese of an International Code first issued by the ICOH in 1992 (see CIS 93-114). Duties and obligations of occupational health professionals: aims and advisory role; knowledge and expertise; development of a policy and a programme; emphasis on prevention and on prompt action; follow-up of remedial actions; safety and health information; commercial secrets; health surveillance; information to the worker; information to the employer; danger to a third party; biological monitoring and investigations; health promotion; protection of community and environment; contribution to scientific knowledge. Conditions of execution of functions: competence, integrity and impartiality; professional independence; equity, non-discrimination and communication; clause on ethics in contracts of employment; records; medical confidentiality; collective health data; relationships with health professionals; combatting abuses; relationships with social partners; promoting ethics and professional audit. (66654)

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CIS 96-591 Rules concerning safety and health signals at work. (French: Signalisation de santé et de sécurité au travail - Réglementation) Menard A., Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Dec. 1994. 72p. Illus. Index. 36 ref., ISBN 2-7389-0342-8 (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0591.pdf

New rules have come into effect in France on the utilization of warning signals concerning the protection of workers against safety and health hazards in the workplace. Such signals may use specific shapes and colours, sound or lights. This document lists all the relevant regulatory texts, including those found in the Labour Code, the Order of 4 Nov. 1993 (see CIS 94-1455) and more specific texts on obligatory signalling in certain situations. The target audience for the document consists of managers, safety officers, members of joint safety and health committees and construction foremen. (66751)

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CIS 96-592 Nordtest register of test methods. Nordtest technical reports and general documents. Nordtest Secretariat, P.O. Box 116, 02151 Espoo, Finland, Jan. 1995. 107p. ### (In English)

Catalogue of all standards registered by the body responsible for harmonization of methods for determining the safety, quality and performance characteristics of products in the Nordic countries. (66990)

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CIS 96-593 Logat 3 - Occupational accident management software. (French: Logat 3 - Logiciel de gestion des accidents du travail) CNPP, Médiathèque du risque, 5 rue Daunou, 75002 Paris, France. Minimum configuration: a microprocessor 80286, 640 Mb RAM memory, 10 Mb on hard disk, monochrome monitor, MS DOS version 3 or higher. ### (In French)

This software designed for the management of occupational accidents includes two files: an "injured persons" file (name, social security number, date of birth, firm, service, status, date of entry, etc.); an "accidents" file including all data subject to notification in France. This software includes numerous possibilities for the production of statistics (general statistics, general data, frequency and severity rate, summary table by sex, status), internal statistics, breakdown by accident factors. (66988)

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CIS 96-594 EuroOSH. Neal A.C., Wright F.B., eds., Chapman & Hall, 2-6 Boundary Row, London SE1 8HN, United Kingdom (E-mail: cust.servcall.co.uk), 1996- , updated 4 times a year. CD-ROM disk for MS DOS computers (needs Windows 3.1 or Windows 95). Price: GBP 1500.00 (USD 2400.00) for initial subscription, GBP 1300.00 (USD 2100.00) for annual renewal [for single users]. ### (In English)

CD-ROM disk containing the full text of English-language occupational safety and health information from the European Union (i.e. all OSH laws and regulations in Great Britain, Northern Ireland and Ireland and all European Union directives and other instruments), as well as that of ILO conventions and directives. The disk also contains summaries and source references for OSH legislation in the other Member States of the European Union. HSE approved codes of practice from the United Kingdom are also included. The disk is fully searchable with up-to-date CD-ROM search software, with hypertext links throughout. (66987)

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CIS 96-595 ILO-CIS: International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre. (French: BIT-CIS - Centre international d'Informations de Sécurité et de Santé au Travail; Spanish: OIT-CIS: Centro Internacional de Información de Seguridad y Salud en el Trabajo) Institute of Occupational Safety Engineering (Tampere University of Technology, Finland), Internet WWW pages, home-page address: http://turva.me.tut.fi/cis/home.html ### (In English, French, Spanish)

Internet pages on CIS, providing information on: CIS products and services; CIS National and Collaborating Centres; ILO publications; International Directory of OSH Institutions; databases and CD-ROMs on OSH; the ILO Encyclopaedia of Occupational Safety and Health; ILO Conventions and Recommendations dealing with OSH; regional programmes on OSH information in Africa and the Asia-Pacific region; chemical safety information sources; CIS staff; projects. A bulletin board is included. (67054)

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CIS 96-596 Directory of sites in occupational & environmental health. Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Internet WWW pages, home-page address: http://www.ed.ac.uk/~rma/sites.html ### (In English)

Internet index to information sources on occupational safety and health on the Internet. Main sections: UK and EU departments and agencies; international and other (US, Canada) government agencies; atmospheric air pollutant emissions across Europe; air pollution information from various UK sources; weather reports from around the world and the UK; useful educational resources; other occupational and environmental resources; occupational and environmental health directories; other directories; full or partial text from relevant medical and other scientific journals; learned societies and associations; miscellaneous; conferences; information for Internet beginners; internal information on the University of Edinburgh. (67055)

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CIS 96-597 International Labour Organization World Wide Web Server. (French: Organisation internationale du Travail - Serveur World Wide Web; Spanish: Servidor de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo en la World Wide Web (WWW)) International Labour Organization (ILO), Internet WWW pages, home-page address: http://gatekeeper.unicc.org/ilo/ ### (In English, French, Spanish)

Internet pages presenting ILO activities and resources on various labour-related issues, including occupational safety and health. Major topics covered: mandate and history of the ILO; the ILO Constitution and the Declaration of Philadelphia; structure and programmes of the ILO; current issues (including child labour, equality for women, human rights, international labour standards); publications and information services; links to other ILO sites (including CIS and its Asian and African programmes). (67056)

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CIS 96-598 OSHWEB. Uusitalo T., Institute of Occupational Safety Engineering (Tampere University of Technology, Finland), Internet WWW pages, home-page address: http://turva.me.tut.fi/~oshweb/ ### (In English)

This index, furnished with hypertext links throughout, contains references to a wide range of OSH-related information on the WWW from around the world. Main topics: chemical safety; commercial resources (consulting, publishers, safety products, software); conferences; construction safety; electrical safety; emergency management; ergonomics, human factors; fire safety; government agencies; human-computer interaction; information services; international organizations; product safety; professional organizations; publications; radiation safety; research institutes; risk management; universities; USENET newsgroups; other resource lists; occupational safety and health WWWBoard. Former title: Index of occupational safety and health resources (with a different home-page address). (67058)

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[ Top of page ]

002 Occupational medicine, epidemiology

CIS 96-599 The Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) in office workers: A case-referent study of personal, psychosocial and building-related risk indicators. Stenberg B., Eriksson N., Höög J., Sundell J., Wall S., International Journal of Epidemiology, Dec. 1994, Vol.23, No.6, p.1190-1197. Illus. 38 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0599.pdf

The Office Illness Project in Northern Sweden, comprising both a screening questionnaire study of 4943 office workers and a case-referent study of Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) in 464 subjects was recently completed. The case-referent study presented in this paper used data from the questionnaire supplemented with information from a clinical examination, a survey of psychosocial factors at work and building data from inspection and measurements taken at the work sites. Personal factors such as atopy and photosensitive skin, psychosocial conditions and physical exposure factors influencing indoor air quality (IAQ), such as outdoor air flow rates and the presence of photocopiers were related to an increased prevalence of the reported SBS symptoms. The rate response relationship between actually measured ventilation rates and the prevalence of perceived SBS symptoms presents strong evidence for the association between IAQ factors and health. (66627)

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CIS 96-600 Esophageal cancer and occupation in a cohort of Swedish men. Chow W.H., McLaughlin J.K., Malker H.S.R., Linet M.S., Weiner J.A., Stone B.J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.749-757. 34 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0600.pdf

Data from the Cancer Environment Registry of Sweden were analyzed for the period 1961 to 1979. A general reduction in oesophageal cancer incidence was found among agricultural and professional workers, whereas excess incidence was found among business, sales and some craftsmen and production jobs. Elevated incidence was associated with the food, beverage and tobacco industries, vulcanizing shops within the rubber industry, and certain automotive building industries. Incidence was also increased among brewery workers and butchers and some service sector workers. The possible role of lifestyle factors (smoking and alcohol drinking) in some of the occupational associations is discussed. (66318)

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CIS 96-601 United States non-Hodgkin's lymphoma surveillance by occupation 1984-1989: A twenty-four state death certificate study. Figgs L.W., Dosemeci M., Blair A., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.817-835. 81 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0601.pdf

Death certificate data were analyzed for 23,890 male and female non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cases and 119,450 noncancer controls from 24 states in the USA for the period 1984-1989. Mortality odds ratios are tabulated according to occupational code. Associations with NHL were observed for a variety of white-collar professionals (managers, teachers), although these may in part reflect socioeconomic factors. Excess risks were also observed among some blue-collar occupations including mechanics, repairmen, welders and machine operators, where exposure to solvents and metals may occur. A positive association among central region farmers was consistent with earlier findings. (66434)

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CIS 96-602 Sick-building syndrome in a tropical city. Ooi P.L., Goh K.T., Lancet, 23 Mar. 1996, Vol.347, No.9004, 841-842. 4 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0602.pdf

This brief communication describes a morbidity survey among 2856 workers in 56 air-conditioned office buildings in Singapore. After excluding health complaints with known causes, 19% of respondents had frequent mucosal and skin irritations, neurotoxic reactions and other ailments suggestive of sick building syndrome. Building-related symptoms were not found to be reliable predictors of indoor air quality or ventilation problems. Factors associated with the syndrome included thermal comfort, lighting and noise. (66444)

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CIS 96-603 Prevalence and predictors of asthma in working groups in British Columbia. Siracusa A., Kennedy S.M., DyBuncio A., Lin F.J., Marabini A., Chan-Yeung M., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.411-423. 46 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0603.pdf

The prevalence of asthma and its predictors was evaluated by questionnaire and allergy skin tests among cedar sawmill, grain elevator, pulpmill and aluminium smelter workers. The overall prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was 4.6% and current asthma 3%. Compared with unexposed workers, the prevalence of asthma after employment in the current industry was 3.9 times higher in cedar sawmill workers, 2.2 times higher in pulpmill and aluminium smelter workers and 1.7 times higher in grain elevator workers. The relative importance of various risk factors including atopy, parental history of asthma and smoking is discussed. (66519)

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CIS 96-604 High mortality in the Thule cohort: An unhealthy worker effect. Juel K., International Journal of Epidemiology, Dec. 1994, Vol.23, No.6, p.1174-1178. 22 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0604.pdf

The cohort consists of 4322 Danish men who were employed between 1963 and 1971 at the Thule air base in Greenland. One part of the cohort was employed during a period of radiation clean-up, the other part had been employed only outside the clean-up period. After 30 years of follow-up, standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.38 for all causes (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28-1.49), 1.25 for cancer (95% CI: 1.07-1.45), 1.17 for circulatory diseases (95% CI: 1.01-1.34), 1.58 for other natural causes (95% CI: 1.35-1.84), and 1.46 for violent deaths (95% CI: 1.22-1.74). Marked excess mortality measured by SMR was found from lung cancer 1.70, AIDS 3.55, alcoholism 4.04, cirrhosis of the liver 2.45, symptoms and ill-defined conditions 1.93, and suicide 1.63. The high mortality and the mortality pattern shows strong evidence for selection and suggests these workers constitute a group in poor health probably caused by their lifestyle. (66626)

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CIS 96-605 International variation in the size of mortality differences associated with occupational status. Kunst A.E., Mackenbach J.P., International Journal of Epidemiology, Aug. 1994, Vol.23, No.4, p.742-750. Illus. 28 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0605.pdf

This study reassesses the international pattern of inequalities in mortality using an inequality index devised recently. Data on mortality by social class were obtained from longitudinal studies from seven countries. The data referred to men aged 35-64 years. The follow-up period was approximately 1971-1981. The size of mortality differences associated with occupational status was measured using a modification of the Relative Index of Inequality. The smallest inequalities in mortality are observed for Norway and Denmark. Larger inequalities are observed for Sweden (compared to Norway circa 1.5 as large), England and Wales (2 times), Finland (4-5 times) and France (6-8 times). Results of sensitivity analyses suggest that probably only a small part of this international pattern can be attributed to differences between countries with respect to occupational classification. The results of most previous international comparisons agree with the general pattern observed here. (66630)

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CIS 96-606 Diadochokinesimetry: A study of patients with Parkinson's disease and manganese exposed workers. Beuter A., Mergler D., de Geoffroy A., Carrière L., Bélanger S., Varghese L., Sreekumar J., Gauthier S., Neurotoxicology, Fall 1994, Vol.15, No.3, p.655-664. Illus. 8 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0606.pdf

Diadochokinesia, the ability to perform rapid alternating movements, is often impaired among patients with Parkinsonism or manganism. In the present study, patients (n=11) with Parkinson's disease are compared with workers formerly exposed to manganese (n=10) and control subjects (n=11) performing rapid alternating hand movements. Data recorded on a diadochokinesimeter were digitalized in real time. Significant differences were found between control subjects and patients with Parkinson's disease, but not with manganese-exposed workers, in most variables examined. However, trajectory length (a combination of movement amplitude and velocity) indicated that manganese-exposed workers and patients with Parkinsonism were significantly different from the controls in functional asymmetries between right and left hand. In addition, workers and patients tend to have marked differences between their right and left hand performance. (66645)

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CIS 96-607 Using psychological tests for the early detection of neurotoxic effects of low level manganese exposure. Iregren A., Neurotoxicology, Fall 1994, Vol.15, No.3, p.671-677. 13 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0607.pdf

Detection of early signs of manganese exposure is fundamental to the prevention of chronic neurotoxic illness in manganese-exposed populations. Five studies and preliminary data from a sixth are reviewed which reported using behavioural measures to explore possible central nervous system effects from current industrial levels of manganese exposure in asymptomatic populations. The paper also provides a discussion of some aspects that may make a test of motor function sensitive to the effects from manganese exposure, and, finally, presents a recommendation for a core set of tests that may be efficient to use while testing for the early neurotoxic effects from low level manganese exposure. (66646)

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CIS 96-608 Back pain among workers in the United States: National estimates and workers at high risk. Guo H.R., Tanaka S., Cameron L.L., Seligman P.J., Behrens V.J., Ger J., Wild D.K., Putz-Anderson V., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Nov. 1995, Vol.28, No.5, p.591-602. 34 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0608.pdf

Data from the Occupational Health Supplement to the 1988 National Health Interview Survey were analyzed. To derive national estimates, a weighting factor was applied to the data available for 30,074 respondents. In 1988, about 22.4 million back pain cases were responsible for 149.1 million lost workdays; 65% of cases were attributable to occupational activities. Among males, the risk was highest for construction labourers (prevalence 22.6%), and among females, for nursing aides (18.8%). Back pain is a major cause of morbidity and lost production for U.S. workers. Previously unrecognized high risk occupations include carpenters, automobile mechanics, maids, janitors and hairdressers. (66669)

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CIS 96-609 Respiratory cancer and other chronic disease mortality among silicotics in California. Goldsmith D.F., Beaumont J.J., Morrin L.A., Schenker M.B., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.459-467. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0609.pdf

Mortality risks were estimated for 590 silicotics claiming workers' compensation claims in California from 1946 to 1975. Findings confirmed that these claimants had an elevated risk for all causes of death, and for tuberculosis, non-malignant respiratory diseases, cancers of the trachea, bronchus and lung and malignancies of the large intestine. Mortality from heart diseases and cancers of the prostrate and lymphatic system was low. Data are tabulated for four industries: construction, mining and quarrying, metallurgy and foundries, and utilities and transportation. (66731)

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CIS 96-610 Inflammatory markers in nasal lavage fluid from industrial arts teachers. Åhman M., Holmström M., Ingelman-Sundberg H., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.541-550. 41 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0610.pdf

Inflammatory markers were examined in nasal lavage fluid sampled from 24 industrial arts teachers exposed to wood dust and other irritants and from 24 controls. The arts teachers had more nasal complaints but they did not differ significantly from the controls regarding various nasal lavage fluid parameters; no evident mucosal inflammation was detected. However, subjects reporting nasal stuffiness had a higher concentration of albumin, and there was a positive correlation between the percentage of neutrophils and the number of classes during the working week. This indicates a possibility of wood-dust-related inflammatory effects on the nasal mucosa. (66737)

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CIS 96-611 Towards causal inference in occupational cancer epidemiology - II. Getting the count right. Veys C.A., Annals of Occupational Hygiene, Apr.1993, Vol.37, No.2, p.181-189. Illus. 13 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0611.pdf

This paper assesses causal inference in occupational cancer epidemiology and highlights the importance of using the right data sources when examining the association between exposure and tumour incidence. At first the study was confined to a mortality analysis using death certificates but it became apparent that several cases had outlived the end-date of the study or had died of an unrelated cause not associated with tumours. The study was changed to include morbidity (incidence) data using cancer registration. Some guidelines, which derive from perusal of the five-year relative survival rates (RSR) and of the ratio of cancer registrations to deaths (R/D) are put forward to help researchers in deciding whether mortality or morbidity is the appropriate statistic for the analysis contemplated. (66743)

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CIS 96-612 Occupational exposure to hydrocarbons and chronic pancreatitis - A case-referent study. McNamee R., Braganza J.M., Hogg J., Leck I., Rose P., Cherry N.M., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sep. 1994, Vol.51, No.9, p.631-637. Illus. 17 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0612.pdf

The aim of the study was to investigate the hypothesis that hydrocarbon exposure is a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. 102 cases of chronic pancreatitis and 204 age- and sex-matched referents were interviewed about their occupational histories, alcohol and cigarette consumption, and diet. Results support the original hypothesis but further studies are necessary to identify responsible hydrocarbons. (66823)

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CIS 96-613 Chronothermobiologic study of Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to a past exposure to vinyl chloride. (French: Etude chronothermobiologique de phénomènes de Raynaud secondaires à une exposition ancienne au chlorure de vinyle monomère) Fontana L., Gautherie M., Albuisson E., Fleury-Duhamel N., Meyer S., Catilina P., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.9-18. Illus. 27 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0613.pdf

The evolution of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) after the end of exposure to vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is not well understood. Sixty-two patients were studied: 44 retired patients who had been exposed to VCM (time since last exposure, at least 8 years) and 18 non-exposed controls. Twelve of the retired patients reported RP affecting the fingers. In order to identify the objective causes of these complaints, a computerized chronothermodynamic examination using the standardized cold test on the 10 fingers was used. Results of exposed patients are compared with those of controls and are analyzed according to their complaints and past exposure to VCM. The authors observed: 1. In summer, a greater incidence of vasoconstriction due to cold in exposed patients with RP than in exposed patients without RP and controls. 2. No seasonal variation of cold test results in patients with RP. 3. No identification of the role of exposure levels on chronothermodynamic results. Conclusion: RP secondary to VCM exposure may persist more than 8 years after the end of exposure. Disorders are usually moderate, but present all year round. (66831)

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CIS 96-614 Effect of glove occlusion on human skin (II) - Long term experimental exposure. Ramsing D.W., Agner T., Contact Dermatitis, Apr. 1996, Vol.34, No.4, p.258-262. Illus. 21 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0614.pdf

The effect of long-term glove occlusion on normal skin (6h/day for 14 days) was studied and, in addition, the effect of a cotton glove worn under the occlusive glove. Two studies were performed: Study A comprised 19 volunteers wearing an occlusive glove on normal skin for 6h/day for 14 days on one hand only; Study B comprised 18 volunteers wearing occlusive gloves on both hands on normal skin; a cotton glove was worn under the occlusive glove on one hand only. Skin barrier function was evaluated by measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration by electrical capacitance and inflammation by erythema index. The gloves used were hypoallergenic, non-latex gloves. Results of Study A: the glove occlusion had a significant negative effect on skin barrier function, as measured by TEWL; results of Study B: the negative effect on skin barrier function from occlusive gloves was prevented by the use of a cotton glove. Gloves may be a substantial factor in the pathogenesis of cumulative irritant contact dermatitis and recommendations as to their use are important. (66842)

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CIS 96-615 The occurrence and course of skin symptoms on the hands among female cleaners. Nielsen J., Contact Dermatitis, Apr. 1996, Vol.34, No.4, p.284-291. Illus. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0615.pdf

Skin symptoms on the hands were studied in questionnaire-based studies conducted in 1989 and 1991 among female cleaning personnel employed at Danish nursing homes, schools and offices. A total of 1,166 participated in 1989, and 1,011 of them participated in 1991. The average age was 45 years and the average length of seniority was 10 years. One-fifth of the cleaners reported problems with cleaning agents. A total of 81% had wet hands for more than one-quarter of their working hours and 43% reported having at least one out of four skin symptoms during a one-year period. Among them, 70% reported improvement during weekends and holidays. A positive correlation was found between hours per week spent with wet hands and skin symptoms. During the follow up period, the risk of developing skin symptoms was higher among the women who remained cleaners than among those who left their cleaning jobs. Accordingly, the prognosis was better in the group that left their cleaning jobs. Retirement occurred more often among cleaners with skin symptoms than among the others. There is a future need to develop new work organization and cleaning methods to reduce the time spent with wet hands. (66844)

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CIS 96-616 Arguments in favour of the occupational aetiology of Dupuytren's contracture - Two epidemiologic studies. (French: Arguments en faveur d'une étiologie professionnelle de la maladie de Dupuytren: à propos de deux enquêtes épidémiologiques) Niezborala M., Le Pors N., Teyssier-Cotte C., Tropet Y., Vichard P., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.8, p.613-619. 30 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0616.pdf

Two studies were undertaken to determine a possible link between hard physical labour and Dupuytren's contracture: a case-control study by questionnaire and an exposed-non-exposed study. In total, 126 subjects who had had surgery for Dupuytren's contracture between 1981 and 1991 were compared with 101 subjects who were hospitalized between 1990 and 1991. The exposed-non-exposed study allowed to compare 191 male subjects (35yrs +), with an occupational history of hard physical labour with 133 controls who had never done physical work. As a whole, it seems highly probable that hard physical labour is a risk factor for Dupuytren's contracture. Moreover, in addition to already known confounding factors, ethnic and genetic factors might also play a role in the aetiology of the condition. (66871)

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CIS 96-617 Occupational hand dermatitis in a tertiary referral dermatology clinic in Taipei. Sun C.C., Guo Y.L., Lin R.S., Contact Dermatitis, Dec. 1995, Vol.33, No.6, p.414-418. 14 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0617.pdf

In order to identify the important industries and causal agents for occupational hand dermatitis (OHD), patients seen in the Contact Dermatitis Clinic of the National Taiwan University Medical Center were interviewed and examined. Patch testing was carried out, using the European standard series and suspected allergens on patients suspected of having allergic skin diseases. OHD was diagnosed according to medical history, work exposure, physical examination and patch test findings. Of the 448 patients with hand dermatitis seen between 1987 and 1993, 36% were diagnosed as having OHD. Electronics, hairdressing, and the medical, chemical and construction industries were the most prominent sectors associated with OHD. In the patients with OHD, 58.5% had irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and 41.5% allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Dorsal fingers, nail folds and dorsal hands were most frequently involved in patients with ACD; dorsal fingers, volar fingers and fingertips were most frequently involved with those with ICD. Patients with atopic history and palm involvement were more likely to have ICD, and those with nail fold involvement more likely to have ACD. In patients with ACD, the most important allergens were dichromate, nickel, cobalt, fragrance mix, epoxy resin, thiuram mix, and p-phenylenediamine. (66899)

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CIS 96-618 Epidemiology and prevention of work-related tumours. (Italian: Epidemiologia e prevenzione dei tumori professionali) Baldasseroni A., Bracci C., Comba P., Nesti M., Pirastu R., Scarselli R., Prevenzione oggi, Jan.-Mar. 1994, Vol.6, No.1, p.25-34. 38 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0618.pdf

This review examines a number of experiences on both international as well as at national level in Italy. Some recommendations on priorities are briefly listed, including identification of working environments at risk, environmental control measures, increasing research on suspected carcinogens and development of exhaustive information systems and prevention activities aimed at employers and workers. (66912)

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CIS 96-619 The danger of immunological contact hypersensitization in the home and job environments. (Italian: Rischio di ipersensibilizzazione immunologica da contatto nell'ambiente domestico e professionale) Bonomini V., Stefoni S., Cianciolo G, Nanni Costa A., Ceccherini R., Palmi S., Prevenzione oggi, Jan.-Mar. 1994, Vol.6, No.1, p.35-39. Illus. 14 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0619.pdf

Modifications in the profiles of the main lymphocyte populations and subpopulations were studied in the peripheral blood of subjects exposed to the risk of contact dermatitis in an occupational environment (hairdressers' shops) and in the household. No significant difference was found between the group of 35 patients (19 females and 16 males) with acute phase contact dermatitis and a control group of healthy subjects. (66913)

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CIS 96-620 Study of job-related toxic liver pathology. (Italian: Studio delle epatopatie tossiche professionali) Tomei F., Papaleo B., Leone M., Fantini S., Giuntoli P., Biagi M., Scarselli R., Palmi S., Baccolo T.P., Prevenzione oggi, Jan.-Mar. 1994, Vol.6, No.1, p.95-115. Illus. 153 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0620.pdf

Workers in industrial waste management may be exposed in a discontinuous and unpredictable way to substances toxic to the liver. Even exposures to low doses can be harmful. 53 workers (mostly males) employed in a toxic industrial waste (including arsenic) treatment plant were studied together with a non-exposed control group of 60 subjects. For all of them a clinical case history questionnaire was filled out, in presence of a doctor, and the following laboratory tests were carried out: complete blood count, GOT, GPT and gamma GT, blood bilirubin (both direct and indirect), alkaline phosphatase, blood proteins, blood creatinine and urine. The obtained results indicate that treatment of industrial wastes may have toxic effects on the liver and that it would be useful to screen workers with procedures like those adopted. (66916)

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CIS 96-621 A bibliography for occupational exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies. Stewart P.A., Dosemici M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1994, Vol.55, No.12, p.1178-1187. approx. 190 ref. ### (In English)

(67033)

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CIS 96-622 A case study of dermatitis based on a collaborative approach between occupational physicians and industrial hygienists. Percival L., Tucker S.B., Lamm S.H., Key M.M., Wilds B., Grumski K.S., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1995, Vol.56, No.2, p.184-188. Illus. 13 ref. ### (In English)

(67037)

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CIS 96-623 The effects of protective occlusive gloves on stratum corneum barrier properties. Graves C.J., Edwards C., Marks R., Contact Dermatitis, Sep. 1995, Vol.33, No.3, p.183-187. Illus. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0623.pdf

Data suggest that protection from gloves is paradoxically reduced because of effects of occlusion on the skin. The aim of this study was to characterize these effects on physical and functional properties of stratum corneum. Volunteer trials were conducted using patches of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) glove material on the skin. Impairment of barrier function was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Hydration and water sorption-desorption were assessed using skin conductance. The major finding was a short-term impairment of barrier function, measured as an increase in TEWL of 1.7g/m2/h. Temporary increases in hydration and water sorption were also observed. On this basis, the effects of wearing PVC gloves over two days on stratum corneum barrier properties on the dorsum of the hand were studied. TEWL measurements remained elevated by 1.5g/m2/h the day after occlusive glove removal, indicating a possible cumulative effect. These studies demonstrate a potential hazard resulting from the repeated use of protective gloves. (66895)

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CIS 96-624 Prevalence and risk factors for chronic bronchitis and farmer's lung in French dairy farmers. Dalphin J.C., Debieuvre D., Pernet D., Maheu M.F., Polio J.C., Toson B., Dubiez A., Monnet E., Laplante J.J., Depierre A., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1993, Vol.50, No.10, p.941-944. 15 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0624.pdf

The prevalence of chronic bronchitis and of clinical farmer's lung was studied in 30 districts of the French Doubs département in relation to individual (age, sex, smoking habits) and geographical (altitude) factors. 5,703 dairy farmers exclusively (response rate 83%) participated in the study by answering a medical questionnaire. Prevalences of chronic bronchitis and clinical farmer's lung were 9.3% and 1.4% respectively. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate risk factors for chronic bronchitis and clinical farmer's lung. A risk of chronic bronchitis was associated with the male sex (p<10-4), age (p<10-4), smoker category (p<10-4), and altitude (p<10-4). A risk of clinical farmer's lung was associated with non-smokers (p<0.05), and linearly with altitude (p<10-4). There was also a strong positive relation between chronic bronchitis and clinical farmer's lung (odds ratio 19.5 (95% CI: 12.1-31.4)) after adjustment for confounding variables. The main finding of this study was the highly significant increase of prevalence of the diseases in relation to altitude. (66750)

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CIS 96-625 Analysis of ferruginous bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage from foundry workers. Dodson R.F., O'Sullivan M., Corn C.J., Garcia J.G.N., Stocks J.M., Griffith D.E., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Nov. 1993, Vol.50, No.11, p.1032-1038. Illus. 24 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0625.pdf

Classical ferruginous bodies in tissue samples are considered to be markers of past exposure to asbestos. Recent studies have shown that the presence of ferruginous bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid correlates with past exposure to asbestos and offers a more sensitive reference than occupational history. Lavage samples from five subjects who had worked in foundries were evaluated by light microscopy for the presence of ferruginous bodies and by transmission electron microscopy for both characterization of the uncoated fibre burden and analysis of the cores of the ferruginous bodies. All samples at lower magnification (light microscopy (200 x)) contained ferruginous bodies. At higher magnification (400 x), a separate population from this group could be identified by the presence of a thin black ribbon. Transmission electron microscopy of the core materials of ferruginous bodies and comparable uncoated particulates supported the reliability of higher magnification light microscopy for distinguishing most of these non-asbestos cores. (66813)

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CIS 96-626 Endemic work-related febrile respiratory illness among construction workers. Epling C.A., Rose C.S., Martyny J.W., Zhen B., Alexander W., Waldron J.A., Kreiss K., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.193-205. Illus. 11 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0626.pdf

An outbreak of respiratory symptoms among construction workers at Denver International Airport, USA was investigated. In a questionnaire survey of 495 workers, 34% reported respiratory symptoms. Risk factors included exposure to fireproofing, work in tunnels and adjoining areas, length of employment at the airport, and preexisting bronchitis. Air sampling revealed the presence of alkaline dust and airborne Penicillium mould. It was concluded that the illness was associated with exposure to irritant dust from fireproofing and/or cement, with a possible contribution from Penicillium mould or associated bioaerosol. (66504)

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CIS 96-627 Respiratory function and immunological reactions in jute workers. Zuskin E., Kanceljak B., Mustajbegovic J., Schachter E.N., Kern J., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1994, Vol.66, No.1, p.43-48. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0627.pdf

The respiratory symptoms and ventilatory capacity of 70 female jute workers in a textile mill in Croatia and of 40 controls were determined in 1970. Of the 70 jute workers, 19 were examined again 19 years later. Although prevalence of chronic cough, phlegm, bronchitis, asthma, dyspnoea, chest tightness and nasal catarrh was higher in the jute workers than in the controls, a statistically significant difference was found only for dyspnoea. Compared with the first study a higher prevalence of all symptoms was found in the follow-up study 19 years later. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and the one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) were significantly reduced in both studies. The reductions were higher in the second study 19 years later. Only one of the 19 jute workers with occupational asthma responded positive to a patch test with jute. (66885)

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CIS 96-628 Occupational hand dermatitis in hospital environments. Stingeni L., Lapomarda V., Lisi P., Contact Dermatitis, Sep. 1995, Vol.33, No.3, p.172-176. Illus. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0628.pdf

A group of 1,301 employees (658 females and 643 males; mean age 39.3yrs) of a hospital in Perugia, Italy answered a self-administered questionnaire. The subjects with anamnestic hand dermatitis and/or atopic mucosal reactions were clinically examined and submitted to skin tests (patch and/or prick tests). Contact dermatitis of the hands and/or forearms occurred in 21.2% and was significantly more frequent in women, subjects under 31 years of age, workers in internal medicine and surgery, cleaners and nurses. In the majority of cases (94.9%), the lesions were irritant in origin and mainly related to disinfectants (especially, chlorhexidine gluconate and glutaraldehyde) and gloves (latex proteins and starch glove powder, rather than accelerators and additives of rubber). Finally, atopy seemed to favour the onset of hand dermatitis. The importance of these results for preventive measures of contact dermatitis in hospital employees is discussed. (66894)

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CIS 96-629 The special study module - A novel approach to undergraduate teaching in occupational medicine. Fletcher G., Agius R.M., Occupational Medicine, Dec. 1995, Vol.45, No.6, p.326-328. 8 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0629.pdf

Recent changes in the General Medical Council curricular framework in the United Kingdom have permitted the development of a special study module (options course) in occupational medicine in which a small number of motivated undergraduates elected to participate and which was adequately resourced. The course laid particular emphasis on changing students' attitudes towards the specialty, self-learning techniques, problem-solving and other skills such as workplace assessment. The objectives, content and teaching methods of the course are described along with a preliminary evaluation. It is suggested that other medical schools should adopt and refine this approach. (66460)

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CIS 96-630 Workers' response to risk notification. Boal W.L., Friedland J., Schulte P.A., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1995, Vol.27, No.4, p.471-483. 41 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0630.pdf

Results of epidemiological studies were sent to 15,958 workers who participated in them. Workers were notified of their increased risk of various diseases following exposure to certain chemicals. Among the seven notifications, worker feedback by telephone ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%, feedback by postcard ranged from 8.8% to 17.6%. The majority of callers enquired about their risk of disease or reported their health status; postcard replies commented on the notification materials or reported ill health. While the system was effective in producing some input from workers, respondents may not be representative of all notified workers. (66285)

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CIS 96-631 Potential genotoxic risk related to simultaneous exposure to radionuclides and cytostatics. Brumen V., Horvat D., Trošić I., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.871-876. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0631.pdf

Mutagenic testing was carried out on 12 female nurses concurrently exposed to ionizing radiation and antineoplastic drugs in a hospital nuclear medicine department. Both conventional structural chromosome aberration analysis and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) tests were carried out. Although neither the incidence of structural chromosome aberrations nor the mean SCE-frequency rate were significantly increased among the nurses compared to a control group, irreparable chromosomal damages and wide SCE-ranges were observed. Findings suggest the possibility of genotoxic implications of concurrent occupational exposure to ionizing radiation and antineoplastic drugs. (66437)

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CIS 96-632 Implementation of a quality system for the examination of occupational diseases. Antti-Poika M., Occupational Medicine, Dec. 1995, Vol.45, No.6, p.298-304. Illus. 15 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0632.pdf

A quality system in accordance with the total quality management (TQM) principles of ISO 9004-2 was introduced at the Department of Occupational Medicine of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. The system involved participation, training and guidelines and was based on the satisfaction of the customers (patients, physicians, insurance companies) and fluency of the activities. When the duration of the completed patient examinations was used as a measure of the fluency, the study demonstrated that TQM is feasible in health care. The approach may be used to complement the traditional audit approach. (66455)

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CIS 96-633 A systematic approach to health surveillance in the workplace. Bell J.G., Bishop C., Gann M., Gilbert M.J., Howe W., Lamb C.T., Leighton-Davies G., McKie N.I.P., Picton-Robinson I., Prestage A.M., Roythorne C., Turner M., Occupational Medicine, Dec. 1995, Vol.45, No.6, p.305-310. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0633.pdf

Health surveillance activities available to occupational health professionals are categorized into occupational or non-occupational, risk-based or unfocused, and as primary, secondary or tertiary preventive measures. Procedures discussed include assessing occupational risks, assessing fitness for work, routine periodical medical examinations, disease screening, and lifestyle health risk assessment. Recommendations are made for the selection of appropriate procedures. The key proposal is to establish a minimum level of periodic health surveillance for all workers based on a lifestyle health risk assessment with the addition of targeted surveillance when appropriate. (66456)

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CIS 96-634 A study of migraine and its effects in a working population. Mounstephen A.H., Harrison R.K., Occupational Medicine, Dec. 1995, Vol.45, No.6, p.311-317. 31 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0634.pdf

A questionnaire survey of 476 employees in a chemical industry research and commercial centre revealed that migraine prevalence during the previous year was 23.2% in women and 11.6% in men. Migraine sufferers reported significantly more headache-related sickness absence than non-migraine sufferers, but did not have more recorded sickness absence overall. There was no firm evidence that the working environment had any effect on the prevalence or frequency of migraine. It is recommended that occupational health departments could assist migraine sufferers with help and advice. (66457)

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CIS 96-635 Occupational risk factors for lung cancer in Tianjin, China. Wang Q.S., Boffetta P., Parkin D.M., Kogevinas M., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.353-362. 29 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0635.pdf

Occupational risk factors for lung cancer cases registered at the Cancer Registry of Tianjin, China during the period 1981-1987 were assessed; patients with cancers at other sites were used as controls. A total of 4,806 male and 3,595 female lung cancer cases were investigated. Elevated risks were found for a number of industries for both sexes, including, in particular, the textile, wood, metal and construction industries. While smoking did not explain the elevated odds ratios for lung cancer in males, a strong correlation was observed in females, suggesting a confounding effect. (66514)

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CIS 96-636 Differentiation of the ILO boundary chest roentgenograph (0/1 to 1/0) in asbestosis by high-resolution computed tomography scan, alveolitis, and respiratory impairment. Harkin T.J., McGuinness G., Goldring R., Cohen H., Parker J.E., Crane M., Naidich D.P., Rom W.N., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.38, No.1, p.46-52. Illus. 35 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0636.pdf

In a study of 37 asbestos-exposed individuals, the 1980 ILO International Classification of the Radiographs of the Pneumoconioses for asbestosis was compared with the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan using a grid scoring system to better differentiate between normal and abnormal in the ILO boundary 0/1 to 1/0 chest roentgenograph. Clinical symptoms, bronchoalveolar lavage and pulmonary function tests were used to assess the presence or absence of disease. The ILO classification and HRCT grid scores were both excellent modalities for the assessment of asbestosis and its association with impaired physiology and alveolitis; their combined use provided statistical associations with alveolitis and reduced diffusing capacity. (66614)

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CIS 96-637 ACOEM Reproductive Hazard Management Guidelines. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.38, No.1, p.83-90. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0637.pdf

This report describes the guidelines put forward by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) for the management of reproductive and developmental risks. Topics covered: reproductive and developmental toxicity (known human teratogens, limited epidemiological and toxicological data); assessment of health risks (hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response evaluation); management options (hazard elimination, exposure controls, risk communication, notification of pregnancy, temporary reassignment, medical surveillance, breast feeding policy, paraoccupational disease management). (66619)

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CIS 96-638 International business trips. Risk analysis and prevention activity in an occupational health department: Investigations of employees of an oil company travelling abroad. (French: Déplacements professionnels internationaux. Analyse des risques, actions de prévention dans un service de médecine du travail - Enquêtes dans une société pétrolière auprès de salariés se déplaçant à l'étranger) Alquier-Bouffard E., Lagisquet C., Jakubiec H., Ministère du Travail (France), Documents pour le médecin du travail, 1st Quarter 1995, No.61, p.7-15. 14 ref. (2nd article: p.17-24) (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0638.pdf

Two articles on the safety and health problems of expatriate staff. The first article deals with risk analysis (occupations and different types of business trips, lack of suitability to lead a "travelling life", health hazards); preventive action by the occupational health department of a large French oil company (in particular, primary prevention: vaccination, pre-travel advice, information, health education). The second article is a report on an investigation conducted by the occupational health department of the same company. In annex: text of two questionnaire surveys on the evaluation of the anti-malaria information campaign conducted by the company (1: retention of advice, aimed at all staff members liable to be sent on mission; 2: evaluation of the respect and impact of anti-malaria preventive action and of possible malaria-related health effects, aimed at all staff members who had actually gone on mission). (66692)

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CIS 96-639 The changing face of industrial hygiene. Vasak V., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.119-127. 8 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0639.pdf

This lecture by the winner of the 1995 William P. Yant Award covers developments in industrial hygiene during the last 40 years with emphasis on progress in the Czech Republic and Australia. Topics covered include: the development of training courses in industrial hygiene and the availability of computer databases; toxicological research and changes in toxicity rating; progress in instrumentation and analytical methods; progress in production technologies and the improvement of working conditions; international cooperation among occupational hygienists; social and ethical aspects; views on the future of industrial hygiene. (66771)

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CIS 96-640 Biological monitoring today and tomorrow. Aitio A., Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 1994, Vol.20, Special issue, p.46-58. 119 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0640.pdf

Biological monitoring is important in the assessment of both occupational exposure to chemical agents and the health risks involved. For some chemicals, data from biological monitoring can be reliably translated into health risks, while for the majority it only indicates uptake. Several workplace chemicals can be analyzed from biological specimens, but no interpretation of health risk or exposure is possible. For such chemicals, comparing the results to data from similar industries may help to determine whether smaller levels of exposure are possible. The biggest problem with most biological monitoring is that no good interpretation is immediately available. Health-based interpretation of biological monitoring will never become possible unless biological monitoring is performed (even in the absence of immediate interpretation) and the results are stored for future analysis in a retrievable and usable form. (66816)

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CIS 96-641 Prevention of lung cancer through the use of knowledge on asbestos and other work-related causes - Norwegian experiences. Langård S., Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 1994, Vol.20, Special issue, p.100-107. Illus. 59 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0641.pdf

This review attempts to estimate the contribution of different known work-related causes of lung cancer among Norwegian men in order to predict the potential of prevention of work-related cases. The presented estimates are based on data from epidemiological studies made in Norway, but may be of significance for other countries with a similar work-force structure. Over the past decade asbestos-related lung cancer appears to have contributed about two-thirds of the lung cancers that have been related to work exposure in Norway. Compounds of nickel and chromium have also contributed, although to a lesser extent, along with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, radon daughters, seafaring work, and other, less significant specific and non-specific determinants of lung cancer. Prevention would be fostered by synergic actions. (66819)

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CIS 96-642 Increased albumin excretion in industrial workers due to shift work rather than to prolonged exposure to low concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Boogaard P.J., Caubo M.E.J., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sep. 1994, Vol.51, No.9, p.638-641. 9 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0642.pdf

In order to elucidate the effect of shift work, a series of renal and hepatic variables were studied in organochlorine workers but now with two different control groups. One control group comprised shift workers and the other only workers on day duty. The exposed and both control groups had roughly equal physical workloads, although one control group comprised shift workers and the other workers who work only during daytime. There were no significant changes in the results of the liver tests between the exposed group and either of the control groups, nor between the two control groups. No significant differences for any renal test were found between the exposed workers and control shift workers, but albumin was significantly lower in the control day workers than in the exposed workers and control shift workers. The results suggest that the previously reported small increase in albuminuria in industrial workers is due to alterations in circadian rhythms due to the shift work system rather than to prolonged exposure to low concentrations of potentially nephrotoxic chemicals. (66824)

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CIS 96-643 Survey of methods and statistical models used in the analysis of occupational cohort studies. Callas P.W., Pastides H., Hosmer D.W., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oct. 1994, Vol.51, No.10, p.649-655. 61 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0643.pdf

Occupational cohort studies published in 1990-91 were located with Medline and Index Medicus, and the contents of several relevant journals were systematically reviewed. Each study was categorized by the methods of external or internal comparisons performed. Of 200 occupational cohort studies identified, 104 (52%) conducted only external comparisons, 46 (23%) conducted only internal and 50 (25%) presented both. Of those that used an external referent population, about two-thirds used a national standard. Forty of the studies that performed internal comparisons fitted multivariable models. The finding that logistic regression is used quite commonly, even though it does not directly model time-dependent data of the type frequently encountered in occupational cohort studies, was surprising. The reasons why investigators choose from among the available statistical and modelling techniques are likely to include familiarity, ease of use, restrictions in study population characteristics, especially study size, and others. Authors should be encouraged to be more explicit about the statistical methods used in the analysis of occupational cohort studies, as well as whether important assumptions about their data have been evaluated. (66825)

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CIS 96-644 French Society of Occupational Medicine and Health - Special meeting on epilepsy of 12 December 1994. (French: Société de médecine et d'hygiène du travail - Séance spéciale, consacrée à l'épilepsie, du 12 décembre 1994) Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.8, p.647-670. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0644.pdf

Papers presented at the special meeting of the French Society of Occupational Medicine and Health on epilepsy and work, held on 12 Dec. 1994: the French Foundation for Research on Epilepsy; different types of epilepsy: clinical features, treatment and monitoring; French regulations on epilepsy and work; fitness for work and convulsive disorders; psychosomatic aspects of epilepsy; patients with recurrent seizures and work. (66874)

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CIS 96-645 The European standard series. Bruynzeel D.P., Andersen K.E., Camarasa J.G., Lachapelle J.M., Menné T., White I.R., Contact Dermatitis, Sep. 1995, Vol.33, No.3, p.145-148. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0645.pdf

Changes to the European standard series which have taken place since the last officially recommended alterations in 1988, are explained. New to the series is the sesquiterpene lactone mix. The PPD black rubber mix and the quinoline mix have been replaced by single components; one of the p-hydroxybenzoates has been left out of the paraben mix. Ethylenediamine dihydrochloride has been dropped from the series. (66893)

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CIS 96-646 Back pain in the working population - Prevalence rates in Dutch trades and professions. Hildebrandt V.H., Ergonomics, June 1995, Vol.38, No.6, p.1283-1298. Illus. 27 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0646.pdf

Data from three annual health surveys conducted by the Dutch Central Statistics Office were sampled. At least 50 respondents were identified for each of 33 trades and 34 professions. Frequent back pain was reported by 26.6% of the workers; 2% reported absence from work in the preceding 2 months. Prevalence rates ranged from 12 to 41%, with the high values found in the building materials, construction, road transport and wholesale industries. Low rates were found in banking, public administration and commercial services. Occupations with high rates were construction, supervisory production work, plumbing, driving and cleaning. Chemists, scientists, bookkeepers, secretaries and administrators had low rates. As the high rates are found in non-sedentary occupations, priority should go to preventive measures in these groups. (66430)

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CIS 96-647 1,364 cases of occupational disease compensated in 1993. (French: 1.364 maladies professionnelles indemnisées en 1993) Pelé A., Bonnin C., Cahiers des Comités de prévention du bâtiment et des travaux publics, 1995, No.6, p.32-35. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0647.pdf

Statistical analysis of occupational diseases in the construction and civil engineering sector in France in 1993, with long-term comparisons provided for the period 1970-1993. Overall, there were 1364 cases of reported and compensated occupational diseases in 1993 in the construction-civil engineering industry, i.e. 21.3% of the 6417 total. There was no significant change from 1992. Three types of disease were the most common: periarticular problems, concrete-induced conditions and noise-induced diseases. Other diseases included those brought about by exposure to vibration, asbestos, wood dust and epoxy resins. A separate table presents the number of cases of newly declared occupational disease, broken down by hazard and agent (dusts; physical hazards; work attitudes, gestures and postures; chemicals; microorganisms; others), for all occupations and for the building industry (1970, 1980, 1985, 1991, 1992 and 1993). (66333)

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CIS 96-648 Job-exposure tables. (French: Les matrices emplois-expositions) Henry L., Deschamps F., Turpin J.C., Cahiers de médecine du travail - Cahiers voor arbeidsgeneeskunde, 1995, Vol.32, No.4, p.241-243. 10 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0648.pdf

Study of job-exposure tables used to evaluate occupational exposures retrospectively. These tables are a useful supplement to medical surveillance in the workplace. Their design relies on the proper collection of information concerning the hazards associated with each work station. Despite their limitations, such tables constitute the best approach to the quantification of workplace hazards. Summary in Dutch. (66335)

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CIS 96-649 Chart of occupational risks relating to the reconstitution of job histories in the Lorraine coal mines. (French: Cartographie des risques professionnels au service de la reconstitution des carrières aux Houillères du Bassin de Lorraine) Mahieu B., Mayer L., Bertrand J.P., Frache A., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.32-36. 3 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0649.pdf

Good knowledge of present and past occupational risks and estimation of workers' exposure levels allow improved prevention by occupational physicians. In France, types of work in mines requiring specific medical surveillance are regulated and cover 80% of the employees in the Lorraine coal mines. Occupational physicians have added to this list a few additional risks. To assess occupational exposure levels, two methods are used: 1) collection of occupational hazards through the telematic transmission system of daily staff checking, with automatic and individual recording of single or serial nuisances defined for a work activity; 2) creation of a chart taking into account present and former occupational risks for each worker, representing a real reconstitution of the occupational hazards history based on computerized data of the jobs and a job-exposure matrix resulting from a study of 170 activities (each activity is a job family with the same hazards). Occupational physicians can carry out personal and specific medical surveillance of a worker - or of a group of workers - exposed to detected risks and then select populations presenting the same exposure criteria for the purpose of epidemiological studies. (66834)

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CIS 96-650 A comprehensive initiative to manage the incidence and cost of occupational injury and illness. McGrail M.P., Tsai S.P., Bernacki E.J., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Nov. 1995, Vol.37, No.11, p.1263-1268. 15 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0650.pdf

A managed care programme involving an in-house preferred provider organization, medical case management and application of ergonomic principles was implemented at a large, university-based medical centre. During the period studied, 1991-1993, there was a significant decrease in injuries and illness and in average days lost per event. There was an increase in the number of restricted-duty days and an 18% reduction in workers' medical and indemnity costs. The study demonstrates the initial effectiveness of an aggressive ergonomic and managed care approach to reducing the incidence, severity and cost of occupational injury and illness. (66376)

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CIS 96-651 Assessment of exposure in occupational epidemiology. Kauppinen T.P., Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 1994, Vol.20, Special issue, p.19-29. Illus. 83 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0651.pdf

Recent progress in assessing exposure in occupational epidemiology studies is reviewed. Traditional methods based on surrogate and qualitative measures of exposure are no longer sufficient for searching for new risks, quantifying risks, and learning about their mechanisms. Prospective studies, case-referent studies within cohorts, and community-based case-referent studies applying interviews of the subjects or confirming exposures from workplaces are designs favouring exposure assessment. Job-exposure matrices have proved useful, especially in analyses of large studies, provided that they are applied so that misclassification does not significantly bias the results. Misclassification of exposure should be regularly assessed and controlled in epidemiological studies. Good documentation of the information used and studies on methodological validity and reliability are needed to develop exposure assessment. (66815)

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CIS 96-652 Calculating cancer risk due to occupational exposure to genotoxic carcinogens. (Dutch: Berekening van het risico op kanker - door beroepsmatige blootstelling aan genotoxisch carcinogene stoffen) Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1995. 54p. 11 ref., ISBN 90-5549-094-6 (In Dutch, English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0652.pdf

In February 1994 a regulation on occupational exposure to carcinogens came into force in the Netherlands. As a result, special measures have to be taken to protect workers against exposure to carcinogenic substances. Also, legally binding occupational exposure limits will be established for these substances, based on a scientific evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of substances at the workplace. In this report the Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards outlines the procedures used in deriving these values, and describes the calculation of the cancer risk resulting from occupational exposure to genotoxic carcinogens. The Committee recommends to calculate the risks using the method of linear extrapolation, unless the available scientific data would favour another method. (66400)

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CIS 96-653 Hand eczema. Menné T., Maibach H.I., CRC Press Inc., 2000 Corporate Blvd. N.W., Boca Raton, Florida 33431, USA, 1994. xiii, 334p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 89.00., ISBN 0-8493-7355-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0653.pdf

This manual comprises a series of papers on research into common varieties of hand eczema. Contents includes: definition, prevalence and classification of hand eczema; chemical skin burns; mechanical trauma and hand eczema; irritant contact dermatitis; contact allergens; risk factors for hand dermatitis in wet work; prediction of skin irritation by noninvasive bioengineering methods; general aspects of risk factors in hand eczema; epidemiological aspects; principles of occupational hand eczema; studies of eczema in hospital workers, hairdressers, fish processing workers, dental personnel, construction workers, caterers and farmers; eczema from metalworking fluids and from rubber gloves; prognosis; UV-light and X-ray treatment; selection of protective gloves. (66673)

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CIS 96-654 Compensable occupational diseases - Aetiology, prevention, therapy: Introduction to their study and treatment. (German: Die entschädigungspflichtigen Berufskrankheiten - Genese, Prävention, Therapie. Einführung für Studium und Praxis) Zerlett G., Ecomed Verlagsgesellschaft AG & Co.KG, Rudolf-Diesel-Strasse 3, 86899 Landsberg/Lech, Germany, 1995. xxiv, 263p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Price: CHF 78.00 (in Switzerland)., ISBN 3-609-63400-6 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0654.pdf

Manual on occupational diseases, aimed primarily at occupational physicians. Contents: survey of relevant legislation in Germany; lists of occupational diseases and criteria for their diagnosis, diseases caused by chemical agents (metals, asphyxiants, solvents, pesticides etc.); diseases caused by physical agents (musculoskeletal disorders, pressurized atmosphere, noise, radiation); infectious and parasitic diseases; diseases of the respiratory system (inorganic and organic dusts); obstructive disorders; skin diseases; miners' nystagmus. (66904)

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CIS 96-655 Environmental medicine. Brooks S., Gochfeld M., Herzstein J., Schenker M., Jackson R., eds., Mosby-Year Book Inc., 11830 Westline Industrial Drive, St.Louis, Missouri 63146, USA, 1995. xix, 780p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 69.00., ISBN 0-8016-6469-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0655.pdf

Contents of this manual: principles and basic science of environmental medicine (environmental hazards, risk and exposure assessment, toxicology, carcinogenesis); clinical environmental medicine (diagnosis, vision, hearing, dermatoses, respiratory disorders, liver and kidney toxicity, nervous system, immunologic disorders); susceptible populations (susceptibility, multiple chemical sensitivity, exposure of children); specific environmental exposure sources (air, water and soil pollution, asbestos, man-made mineral fibres, fire and pyrolysis products, radiation, vibration, heat stress, high-altitude and space medicine, chemical and biological agents, hazardous waste); preventive approaches (health surveillance, biomarkers, chemical disaster preparedness, health risk communication). (66935)

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CIS 96-656 Occupational health - Decennial supplement. Drever F., Office of Population Censuses and Surveys, ed., HMSO Publications Centre, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1995. xxi, 374p. Bibl.ref. Price: GBP 29.00., ISBN 0-11-691618-4 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0656.pdf

This publication presents and comments on statistics on occupational health and mortality in the United Kingdom for various periods between 1970 and 1994. Contents: data sources; demographic and employment trends; occupational mortality of men and women and by cause of death; cancer incidence in England, 1981-1987; comparison of mortality for the 1971 and 1981 census cohorts; asbestos related diseases; monitoring occupational diseases; occupational injuries; smoking, drinking and occupation; occupation and sickness absence; occupation and fertility; outline of ad hoc occupational mortality studies; international comparisons. (66675)

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CIS 96-657 International Agency for Research on Cancer - Biennial Report 1994/95. (French: Centre international de Recherche sur le Cancer - Rapport biennal 1994-1995) International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon, Cedex 08, France, 1995. xiii, 250p. Illus. 706 ref. Index., ISBN 92-832-1095-6 (En), ISBN 92-832-2095-1 (fr) (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0657.pdf

The activities of the Agency are presented under eight headings: cancer occurrence and outcome; environmental causes of cancer (occupational causes, radiation); carcinogenesis by organ site; mechanisms of carcinogenesis; prevention and early detection of cancer; development of methods for cancer research; IARC publications, education and training; scientific support activities. (66671)

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CIS 96-658 RIDDOR: Information for doctors. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Mar. 1996. 19p. 3 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0658.pdf
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/hse32.htm

This leaflet provides guidance for doctors on the requirements of the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (see CIS 95-1930). Reportable diseases and occupational activities associated with them are listed from Schedule 3 of the Regulations, and guidance is given on how doctors can help in the reporting system. (66764)

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[ Top of page ]

003 Industries and occupations

CIS 96-659 Occupational hand dermatoses of hairdressers in Tainan City. Guo Y.L., Wang B.J., Lee J.Y.Y., Chou S.Y., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oct. 1994, Vol.51, No.10, p.689-692. Illus. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0659.pdf

Hairdressers from nine establishments randomly selected in Tainan City were studied by interview, medical examination and patch testing. Patch test agents included 41 substances with common allergens, shampoo preservatives, hair dyes, and permanent waving and bleaching agents. Eighty-three percent of the 98 hairdressers examined had occupational dermatosis and 32% had scissor-induced scars or wounds. Hairdressers in Tainan City had a high prevalence of dermatosis including traumatic wounds, and allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. The rates of sensitivity to some of the common sensitizing agents were different from previous reports. (66828)

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CIS 96-660 International conference: Agricultural medicine and rural health. Zagórski J., ed., AAEM - Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine, 1995, Vol.2, No.2, p.95-206. Illus. Bibl.ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0660.pdf

Proceedings of an international conference on agricultural medicine and rural health held in Kraków, Poland, 7-8 September 1995. Papers related to agricultural operations include: evaluation of occupational exposure to noise among operators of tractors and self-propelled machines; exposure of rural inhabitants employed outside private farming to hazardous and noxious factors in the working environment; occupational risk caused by application of pesticides; contact allergy to pesticides; honey-bee venom allergy. Abstracts only: toxic substances in the rural environment; legal regulations concerning nitrates and nitrites in Poland. (66445)

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CIS 96-661 Agriculture-related sprain and strain injuries, 1985-1987. Bobick T.G., Myers J.R., International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Oct. 1994, Vol.14, No.5, p.223-232. 17 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0661.pdf

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has expanded its research programme investigating agricultural injuries. Data from the Supplementary Data System (SDS), maintained by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor, indicate that injuries to the back and lower extremities of agricultural workers are quite common. Injury data from SDS were examined for agricultural employees for the years 1985-1987 from the 21 states that consistently provided records for each year. During this 3-year period, a total of 71,098 injuries were reported to SDS for the agricultural Industry Groups included in this study. Of these, 26,450 (37.2%) were classified as sprains and strains. Analysis of the data indicate that workers in industries within the major groupings of crop production and agricultural services have an increased potential for sustaining a sprain or strain injury. (66623)

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CIS 96-662 Incidence of farm-work-related acute injury in a defined population. Nordstrom D.L., Layde P.M., Olson K.A., Stueland D., Brand L., Follen M.A., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.551-564. Illus. 48 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0662.pdf

Data on 510 farm-work-related injuries in an area of central Wisconsin during a two-year period were analyzed. One farm resident in every 31 was treated annually for such an injury; eight per cent of these cases were hospitalized. Cases are tabulated by cause of injury. Animals were the most frequent source of injury, followed by machinery and falls; severity of injury did not appear to vary by source of injury. 38% of cases occurred in nonfarm residents. Injury risk was 2.5 times greater among dairy farm residents than among nondairy farm residents. (66738)

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CIS 96-663 Farm-work hazard prevention efforts by school-based agricultural education instructors. Chapman L.J., Schuler R.T., Wilkinson T.L., Skjolaas C.A., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.565-577. 42 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0663.pdf

A questionnaire survey of high school agricultural education instructors in Wisconsin, USA, revealed that nearly all devoted some time to health and safety related activities. Only a minority of instructors agreed that modifying the work to eliminate hazards should be emphasized over training people to work safely round hazards. Instructors faced problems of time pressures, lack of student interest, and need for materials and other resources. It was concluded that safety education alone is unlikely to reduce injuries unless unsafe conditions are modified; instructors need to emphasize teaching of skills in hazard recognition, identification and control. (66739)

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CIS 96-664 Traumatic work related fatalities in commercial fishermen in Australia. Driscoll T.R., Ansari G., Harrison J.E., Frommer M.S., Ruck E.A., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sep. 1994, Vol.51, No.9, p.612-616. 27 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0664.pdf

Work-related traumatic fishing fatalities were studied as part of a larger study of all work-related traumatic fatalities in Australia from 1982 to 1984. Data on 47 cases were obtained from inspection of coroners' files. The incidence of fatality of 143/100,000 person-years was 18 times higher than the incidence of fatality for the entire workforce, and considerably higher than that of the mining and agricultural workforces. 68% of decedents drowned and 13% died from physical trauma. Rough weather, non-seaworthy vessels, inadequate use of personal flotation devices and inexperience were associated with many of the fatal incidents. Improved vessel and equipment maintenance, better training of workers, greater use of personal flotation devices and development of improved clothing and personal flotation devices are recommended. (66822)

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CIS 96-665 Mortality of a cohort of U.S. workers employed in the crushed stone industry, 1940-1980. Costello J., Castellan R.M., Swecker G.S., Kullman G.J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.625-640. 35 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0665.pdf

The mortality of 3,246 males employed for one or more years during 1940-1980 at 20 crushed stone operations in the USA was evaluated. Four deaths were attributed to pneumoconiosis; at least two of these deaths were probably due to occupational dust exposures. Mortality attributed to pneumoconiosis and other nonmalignant respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive lung disease, was significantly increased overall, and especially so for a subcohort of granite workers. Lung cancer mortality was elevated overall, significantly so among granite workers, with at least a latency of 20 years. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to respirable silica dust is a risk factor for lung cancer. (66311)

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CIS 96-666 Exposure-response analysis of mortality among coal miners in the United States. Kuempel E.D., Stayner L.T., Attfield M.D., Buncher C.R., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.167-184. Illus. 30 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0666.pdf

In a study of 8,878 coal miners in the USA, significant exposure-response relationships were observed for cumulative exposure to respirable coal mine dust and mortality either from pneumoconiosis or from chronic bronchitis or emphysema. Miners exposed at or below the current U.S. coal dust standard of 2mg/m3 over a working lifetime, have an elevated risk of dying from these diseases. No exposure-related increases in lung cancer or stomach cancer were observed. Pneumoconiosis mortality varied significantly according to the rank of coal dust to which the miners were exposed. (66502)

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CIS 96-667 Mortality of iron miners in Lorraine (France) - Relations between lung function and respiratory symptoms and subsequent mortality. Chau N., Benamghar L., Pham Q.T., Teculescu D., Rebstock E., Mur J.M., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Nov. 1993, Vol.50, No.11, p.1017-1031. 96 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0667.pdf

An increased mortality from lung and stomach cancer was found in previous studies on Lorraine iron miners. In this study the cohort included 1,178 workers selected at random from all the 5,300 working miners aged between 35 and 55 at the start of the follow-up period, which ranged from 1975 to 1985. Occupational exposures and tobacco consumption, lung function tests and respiratory symptoms were assessed for each subject in 1975, 1980 and 1985. The study confirmed the excess of lung and of stomach cancer. It is considered that the risk of lung cancer in the Lorraine iron miners was mainly due to dust, diesel engine exhaust fumes and explosives although the role of low exposure to radon daughters could not be totally excluded. (66812)

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CIS 96-668 Comparison of the health of the miners of underground mines and bituminous coal mines. Brhel P., Rybáková Z., Central European Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1995, Vol.1, No.1, p.25-30. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0668.pdf

The health of 166 underground lignite miners in the Czech Republic was compared with that of 166 age-matched bituminous coal miners in the same region. Among subjective complaints, symptoms of musculoskeletal and nervous system disorders predominated. Bituminous miners suffered a higher prevalence of dyspnoea, cough, chest pains, white finger phenomenon and hearing loss. They also showed a higher mean systolic blood pressure and lower ventilatory parameters; 12% had pneumoconiosis. Lignite miners showed no respiratory impairment but had a higher frequency of joint and back pains. The prevalence of symptoms reflects the working conditions in each type of mine. (66971)

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CIS 96-669 Mortality in a cohort of antimony smelter workers. Schnorr T.M., Steenland K., Thun M.J., Rinsky R.A., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.759-770. 29 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0669.pdf

A mortality study was carried out among 1,104 men, mainly Hispanics, employed between 1937 and 1971 in an antimony smelter in Texas, USA. When ethnic-specific Texas lung cancer death rates were used for comparison, mortality from lung cancer among the antimony workers was elevated and a positive trend in mortality was observed with increasing duration of employment. The data suggest some increased mortality from lung cancer and perhaps ischaemic heart and nonmalignant respiratory diseases in workers exposed to antimony. However, conclusions are limited by possible confounding factors and the difficulty of identifying appropriate referent groups. (66319)

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CIS 96-670 Increased variability in bronchial responsiveness in aluminum potroom workers with work-related asthma-like symptoms. Søyseth V., Kongerud J., Boe J., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.38, No.1, p.66-69. 25 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0670.pdf

The variability in bronchial responsiveness to methacholine was studied in 26 aluminium potroom workers with work-related asthma-like symptoms. Measurements of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), methacholine challenge tests and symptom assessments were carried out at regular intervals over a period of two years. Bronchial responsiveness was calculated from measurements of FEV1. Results indicated that the variability in bronchial responsiveness in these workers was positively associated with respiratory symptoms. (66616)

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CIS 96-671 Proportionate mortality among construction labourers. Stern F., Schulte P., Sweeney M.H., Fingerhut M., Vossenas P., Burkhardt G., Kornak M.F., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1995, Vol.27, No.4, p.485-509. 78 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0671.pdf

Death certificate data were analyzed for 11,685 members of the Laborers' International Union of North America (LIUNA) who died between 1985 and 1988. Elevated mortality risks were observed for all malignant neoplasms, as well as for neoplasms of the lung, stomach, and thyroid gland. The proportionate cancer mortality ratios for these malignant neoplasms were elevated among both white and non-white males, regardless of length of union membership, in most 10-year categories of age of death above 40 and for the three largest LIUNA regions examined. The occurrence of 20 mesothelioma deaths indicated previous exposure to asbestos. Elevated risks were also observed for deaths from transportation and other types of injuries. (66286)

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CIS 96-672 The safety coordinator: Extensive but logical changes. (French: Le coordonnateur de sécurité: une évolution profonde mais logique...) Travail et sécurité, Sep. 1995, No. 540, p.461-479. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0672.pdf

The law of 31 Dec. 1993 (CIS 95-1941), which is the implementation in French law of the European directive on temporary or mobile worksites, requires the coordination of safety on all sites where two or more enterprises are working. The implications of this new regulation in practice, the functions of the coordinator, his powers, difficulties that may arise and the benefits in accident reduction that will result are presented. (66304)

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CIS 96-673 Integration of safety measures and organization of coordination efforts in the field of safety and health protection during construction and civil engineering work. (French: Intégration de la sécurité et organisation de la coordination en matière de sécurité et de protection de la santé lors des opérations de bâtiment ou de génie civil) APAVE, Jan.-Feb.-Mar. 1995, No.269, p. 64-71. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0673.pdf

Law 93-1418 of 31 Dec. 1993 integrates into French legislation the provisions of Directive 92/57/EEC concerning temporary or mobile construction sites. This article provides information on the relevant regulations in effect in France and on the organization of coordination efforts concerning OSH matters in the construction and civil engineering sectors. In addition, it includes a table on the provisions of Decree 94-1159 (see CIS 95-1941) of 26 Dec. 1994. (66337)

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CIS 96-674 Self-employed builders: Factors which influence the probability of work-related injury and illness. Mayhew C., Gibson G., Journal of Occupational Health and Safety - Australia and New Zealand, Feb. 1996, Vol.12, No.1, p.61-67. Illus. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0674.pdf

Self-employed builders are not covered by workmen's compensation in the Australian state of Queensland, therefore their injuries and illnesses are not recorded in the appropriate Queensland database. This research project was designed to evaluate their occupational health and safety (OHS) status. A sample of 500 self-employed builders in the state was included in a questionnaire survey. It was found that OHS legislation was poorly understood by these builders and that the incidence of work-related illness and injury was quite high among them, particularly in areas of high population growth. On the other hand, in areas with high general OHS awareness, such as mining towns, self-employed builders also exhibited good OHS knowledge. (66383)

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CIS 96-675 Improvement of the working conditions and health protection of stonecutters. (German: Verbesserung der Arbeitsbedingungen sowie des Arbeits- und Gesundheitsschutzes für Steinmetzbetriebe) Heeg F.J., Deurer W., Feld K.H., Kleine G., Lüttke-Nymphius M., Räder K., Rodzinski H., Zeitschrift für Arbeitswissenschaft, Dec. 1994, Vol.48, No.4, p.205-216. Illus. 10 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0675.pdf

Exposure to quartz dust and noise, lighting conditions and work postures were determined in 10 stone dressing plants in Germany. A questionnaire survey of the stonecutters was conducted in order to determine the subjectively perceived conditions of work. An enclosure for drawing off the quartz dust and an adjustable table to improve work posture are described. Work organization was changed. The layout of an optimized stone dressing plant is illustrated. (66849)

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CIS 96-676 Industrial injury cost analysis by occupation in an electric utility. Dieterly D.L., Human Factors, Sep. 1995, Vol.37, No.3, p.591-595. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0676.pdf

Data on industrial injuries at the Southern California Edison Company for the period 1980 to 1987 were analyzed; cost data were converted to 1993 dollars. A cost model was developed based on medical costs, indemnity costs and lost productivity costs. The total average cost per injury for the 46 occupations was USD 5,173; the occupational total average injury cost ranged from USD 300 to USD 19,500. Occupations with high total average injury costs may be selected for special injury reduction programmes. The model provides a forecasting tool for generating future injury costs for current years. (66293)

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CIS 96-677 Sex differences in work-related injury rates among electric utility workers. Kelsh M.A., Sahl J.D., American Journal of Epidemiology, May 1996, Vol.143, No.10, p.1050-1058. Illus. 27 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0677.pdf

Injury trends were examined by type, severity and how they occurred among a cohort of 9,582 female and 26,898 male electric utility workers employed during 1980-1992. Unadjusted injury rates were higher throughout the period for male workers. However, after adjustment for occupation, job experience and age, elevated rate ratios indicate that female workers have higher injury rates. The rate ratios were slightly higher for more severe injuries. Differences between male and female workers in training, physical capacity, task assignments, as well as other factors, could explain the observed injury trends. (66923)

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CIS 96-678 Mortality patterns among women in the motor vehicle manufacturing industry. Beall C., Delzell E., Macaluso M., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.325-337. 30 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0678.pdf

The mortality experience of 11,271 women employed in a large motor vehicle manufacturing company in 1973 was evaluated. Follow-up was conducted to 1985. The overall mortality rate of the cohort was lower than the U.S. rate by 15% among whites and by 40% among blacks. Among whites, the low mortality rate was due primarily to deficits of noncancer deaths, although a 32% deficit was also observed for breast cancer. Despite evidence of a strong healthy worker effect among women in this industry, the study found excesses of lung cancer among white women in assembly jobs and of pancreatic cancer among white assembly workers in upholstery and trim operations. (66512)

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CIS 96-679 Mortality among Icelandic seamen. Rafnsson V., Gunnarsdóttir H., International Journal of Epidemiology, Aug. 1994, Vol.23, No.4, p.730-736. 30 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0679.pdf

In all 27,884 Icelandic seamen, both fishermen and sailors of the merchant fleet, who had been members of a pension fund between 1958 and 1986, were followed-up. Most standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were greater than 1: 1.26 for all causes, 1.13 for all malignant neoplasms, 1.80 for liver cancer, 1.19 for stomach cancer, 1.56 for lung cancer, and 1.21 for kidney cancer. The highest SMR was found for unknown causes, 3.16. There was no "healthy worker effect". For most causes of death latency time and mortality were strongly correlated. When analyzing the relation between duration of employment and mortality a correlation was found for all-causes and for stomach cancer; however, this was not statistically significant. The excess of stomach and lung cancer was high but it was not convincingly related to duration of employment and thus a relationship to occupation cannot be confirmed. (66628)

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CIS 96-680 Mortality among seamen with special reference to work on tankers. Moen B.E., Riise T., Helseth A., International Journal of Epidemiology, Aug. 1994, Vol.23, No.4, p.737-741. 21 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0680.pdf

Mortality was studied in 1687 men who were captains and mates during the period 1970-1987, and were registered by a Norwegian census in 1970. In all 181 deaths were found. Each case was age-matched at the time of death to three individuals from the rest of the population alive at this date. Information about the seamen's work on different ships was obtained for cases and controls. Seamen working on tankers had a higher mortality rate ratio (RR=2.43, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.65-3.60) than seamen not working on tankers. The increased risk was especially related to death from cancer and from accidents, while no significantly increased mortality due to cardiovascular disease was found. Employment as a mate on tankers showed the highest all-causes risk of death (RR=3.14, 95% CI: 2.04-4.82) as well as for cancer (RR=4.24, 95% CI: 2.02-8.88) and accidents (RR=5.85, 95% CI: 1.66-20.60). Employment as a captain on tankers showed no significantly increased mortality. (66629)

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CIS 96-681 Crashes of instructional flights. Baker S.P., Lamb M.W., Li G., Dodd R.S., Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Feb. 1996, Vol.67, No.2, p.105-110. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0681.pdf

Data on 638 crashes involving a student pilot or a flight for instructional purposes were analyzed. Factors associated with the crashes included loss of control on landing, crosswinds, stalls, trainees on solo flights, touch-and-go landings on solo flights, and running out of fuel. Simulated emergencies resulted in 49 crashes. Instructor-related factors were identified as contributing to one-third of crashes. Greater emphasis during flight training needs to be placed on avoiding stalls and midair collisions, managing crosswinds, and understanding the dynamics of takeoffs and landings prior to solo touch-and-go practice. (66676)

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CIS 96-682 Cardiovascular diseases among French train drivers. (French: Epidémiologie des maladies cardio-vasculaires parmi les conducteurs de trains français) Cothereau C., Cambou J.P., Simon S., Bailly J.C., Conso F., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.37-40. Illus. 6 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0682.pdf

A retrospective study of cardiovascular disease was carried out in 1991 among French train drivers. Cardiovascular problems were the fourth cause of sick leave exceeding 21 days and of 14% of the deaths. The principal pathology concerned was coronary heart disease. Eventual return to normal duties depends on the nature of the disease: train drivers with ischaemic heart disease cannot resume their normal work. (66835)

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CIS 96-683 A case-control study of leukemia among petroleum workers. Sathiakumar N., Delzell E., Cole P., Brill I., Frisch J., Spivey G., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Nov. 1995, Vol.37, No.11, p.1269-1277. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0683.pdf

The relationship between leukaemia and the work histories of active and retired employees of a large petroleum company was investigated. The study included 69 leukaemia cases and 284 matched controls. Employment in production-related work in the oil and gas division was associated with myelogenous leukaemia and particularly with acute myelogenous leukaemia. The association with the acute form was strongest for subjects with longest duration (32+ years) of production-related work, and there was a consistent trend of increasing risk for increasing duration of employment. No clear association was found between leukaemia and work in the refining division. (66377)

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CIS 96-684 Mortality among workers at a plastics manufacturing and research development facility: 1946-1988. Dell L., Teta M.J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.373-384. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0684.pdf

A mortality study was carried out among a cohort of 5,932 male employees at a plastics facility in New Jersey, USA. Potential exposures included asbestos, formaldehyde and polyvinyl chloride. Based on U.S. rates, mortality among hourly workers from all cancers was similar to expected. Excess mortality was seen for pancreatic cancer and for some malignancies of the respiratory system (5 deaths from pleural mesothelioma). Mortality from leukaemia among research and development workers was significantly elevated and related to assignment to process development. The study verifies the excess of pancreatic cancer among workers at the facility seen in earlier studies and highlights excesses of mesothelioma due to asbestos exposure. (66516)

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CIS 96-685 Cancer morbidity among employees in a Danish pharmaceutical plant. Hansen J., Olsen J.H., Larsen A.I., International Journal of Epidemiology, Oct. 1994, Vol.23, No.5, p.891-898. 26 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0685.pdf

The files of 10,889 people ever employed (1964-1988) at the pharmaceutical plant were followed-up in the nationwide Danish Cancer Registry. Site-specific standardized incident ratios (SIR) were estimated, based on cancer rates for the national population. Information on risk factors for breast cancer, e.g. number of children, age at menarche and first delivery, obesity, and non-occupational use of sex hormones was obtained from samples of the female employees, and compared to equivalent variables from the general population. The overall SIR for women was significantly elevated (n=5554; SIR=1.2). Excess risk was particularly seen for breast cancer (n=97; SIR=1.5). The SIR was near unity for men (n=5335); however three men with breast cancer versus 0.4 expected were found. Lifestyle components explained only about one-quarter of the excess female breast cancers. (66632)

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CIS 96-686 Mortality among employees at a plastics and resins research and development facility. Cowles S.R., Tsai S.P., Gilstrap E.L., Ross C.E., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dec. 1994, Vol.51, No.12, p.799-803. 29 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0686.pdf

This retrospective cohort study examined mortality from 1962 to 1992 for 257 men who were employed for at least one year during a 14-year period from 1962 to 1975 at a plastics and resins research and development facility (applications and process development for polypropylene, polystyrene, epoxy resins and, to a lesser extent, high-density polyethylene). The cohort was young and was followed up for an average of 26 years. Although mortality for all causes among employees who worked at least one year at this facility was low (standardized mortality ratio (SMR) 0.74), the death rate from cancer was moderately higher than that of the general population (14 observed and 0.4 expected deaths). The increased cancer mortality was entirely due to excess deaths from pancreatic and lung cancers. No causative agent or process for these cases of pancreatic cancer has been identified. This study shows no increased colorectal cancer mortality. (66876)

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CIS 96-687 Respiratory symptoms and ventilatory capacity in workers in a vegetable pickling and mustard production facility. Zuskin E., Mustajbegovic J., Schachter E.N., Rienzi N., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1993, Vol.64, No.6, p.457-461. Illus. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0687.pdf

A group of 117 women exposed to acid aerosols and spice dusts in a vegetable pickling plant in Varazdin, Croatia, was found to have significantly higher incidence of chronic cough, chest tightness, nasal catarrh and sinusitis than a control group working in a bottling plant. The prevalence of acute symptoms was greater in the pickling department than in the mustard making or packing departments. Compared with the control group, women in the pickling department with an exposure of more than one year had greater across-shift reductions of pulmonary function. (66881)

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CIS 96-688 Sale of tickets for shows - The success of a specialized team. (French: La vente de billets de spectacles - La réussite d'une équipe de spécialistes) Jarzuel Y., Hagau S., Cahiers de médecine interprofessionnelle, 1995, No.4, p.469-480. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0688.pdf

The purpose of this study was to analyze the work performed by ticket sellers in the entertainment industry in order to better understand the characteristics of the job and to find ways to reduce the increasingly heavy workload involved. Ticket selling is a complex job, requiring a thorough knowledge of constantly changing information about cultural, organizational and administrative matters. The emotional involvement of staff in the job is high, with actual selling taking up less time than the provision of advice and information and the performance of preparatory activities. Calls by telephone and MINITEL (French on-line service using the telephone network) contribute to the heavy workload by constant interruptions of regular work, particularly during rush periods. The increasing demands of this kind of work, in both quantitative and qualitative terms, tire the staff and reduce the quality of service they can provide. (66331)

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CIS 96-689 Working in paradise: Health services provided for staff at island tourist resorts. Wilks J., Walker S., Wood M., Nicol J., Oldenburg B., Journal of Occupational Health and Safety - Australia and New Zealand, Feb. 1996, Vol.12, No.1, p.41-48. Illus. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0689.pdf

Report on a study of 1123 staff visits to health clinics at three tropical island resorts off the coast of Queensland (Australia) during the period Jan.-June 1994. Medical conditions (mostly respiratory, digestive, skin and nervous system complaints) accounted for 81% of the visits, with injuries (mostly lacerations, sprains and animal bites and stings) accounting for the other 19%. Administration of first aid and medication, with or without telephone consultation of a medical practitioner on the mainland, was sufficient treatment in most cases: only seven patients had to be evacuated to the mainland for medical reasons. The unique needs of staff in remote locations and the critical role of the resident nurse are stressed. The ICD-9-CM coding system was used uniformly for the analysis of the injuries and medical conditions. (66382)

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CIS 96-690 Laboratory safety - An insurer's view. Wrightson I., Safety and Health Practitioner, Jan. 1996, Vol.14, No.1, p.20-23. Illus. 11 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0690.pdf

Employers liability insurance in the United Kingdom is discussed with particular reference to laboratory operators. The need for improved safety and health management in order to prevent accidents and ill-health and thus minimize insurance claims and costs is highlighted. A health and safety policy for laboratories is described based on risk assessment, training, and measuring and evaluating performance. A systematic management approach to the control of laboratory health and safety would be instrumental in preventing and defending claims under the employer's liability policy. (66478)

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CIS 96-691 Development of hand eczema in junior hairdressers - An 8-year follow-up study. Majoie I.M.L., Von Blomberg B.M.E., Bruynzeel D.P., Contact Dermatitis, Apr. 1996, Vol.34, No.4, p.243-247. 30 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0691.pdf

The development of hand eczema was evaluated in an eight-year follow-up study carried out in 51 junior hairdressers. Predisposing factors were investigated. Data were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire to which there was a 74% response. None of the junior hairdressers presented with hand eczema at the start of the survey. After eight years, however, 51% had developed hand eczema. No significant difference in prevalence of hand eczema was found between practising and non-practising hairdressers (58% versus 33%). Development of hand eczema was not related to atopic constitution or nickel sensitivity. Dry skin type was associated with increased risk of developing hand eczema. (66841)

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CIS 96-692 Personal radio transmitters protect employees - The life-saving call. (German: Personen-Notsignal-Anlage schützt Mitarbeiter - Der rettende Ruf) Morschheuser R., Krankenhaustechnik, Oct. 1995, Vol.21, No.10, p.29-31. Illus. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0692.pdf

An alarm system for the protection of hospital employees working in isolation is presented. A radio transmitter, worn during work in isolation, is capable of sensing unusual body movements such as a collapse. It automatically transmits a help signal to a manned receiving station. It can be combined with a cellular phone which automatically dials emergency numbers and plays a recorded call for help. This personal alarm system has been successfully in use for almost two years in a psychiatric hospital and in a large general hospital in Germany. (66851)

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CIS 96-693 Work in operating rooms and pregnancy outcome among nurses. Saurel-Cubizolles M.J., Hays M., Estryn-Behar M., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1994, Vol.66, No.4, p.235-241. Illus. 28 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0693.pdf

A survey of the outcome of 776 pregnancies among 418 nurses in 17 hospitals in Paris, France, during the period June 1987 and June 1989 revealed that the frequency of spontaneous abortions was significantly higher for nurses who worked in the operating room during pregnancy. It was also significantly higher for nurses exposed to a combination of anaesthetic gases, aqueous formaldehyde solution (Formol) and ionizing radiation during the first three months of pregnancy. (66890)

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CIS 96-694 Skin problems among Danish dental technicians - A cross-sectional study. Mürer J.L., Poulsen O.M., Roed-Petersen J., Tüchsen F., Contact Dermatitis, July 1995, Vol.33, No.1. p.42-47. Illus. 26 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0694.pdf

A cross-sectional questionnaire study among 192 dental technicians at work was performed with an expanded version of a survey questionnaire used 10 years previously. The cumulative prevalence of skin problems on the hands was 53%. The one-year prevalence was 43%. The point prevalence was 36%. These figures were much higher than the figures reported for the general population, and they did not differ from those obtained in the study 10 years previously. The point prevalence of skin problems on the hands among individuals handling acrylates was 38% higher than among those who never worked with acrylates. No difference in the occurrence of skin problems was observed between individuals using gloves and those who did not use gloves while handling acrylates. The prevalence difference of skin problems on the fingertips was 7.3% between individuals handling acrylates daily or several times per week and individuals handling acrylates less frequently. (66892)

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CIS 96-695 A descriptive study of health problems on car mechanics' hands. Moen B.E., Hollund B.E., Torp S., Occupational Medicine, Dec. 1995, Vol.45, No.6, p.318-322. Illus. 14 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0695.pdf

In a questionnaire survey of 172 car mechanics, 14% reported white finger (Raynaud's phenomenon), 24% reported paraesthesias in the hands or arms, 41% reported dry skin on the hands, 46% reported hand eczema, and 28% had experienced more than 20 cuts on the hands during the previous year. Hand eczema, white finger and cuts on the hands were all associated with employment for less than 14 years as a car mechanic. Further surveillance of the working environment of car mechanics is required. (66458)

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CIS 96-696 A detailed analysis of work-related injury among youth treated in emergency departments. Knight E.B., Castillo D.N., Layne L.A., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.793-805. 39 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0696.pdf

Telephone interviews were conducted with 146 14-16 year-olds who had incurred an occupational injury during a two-month period. 32% of the injuries occurred as a result of using equipment. Over half the workers reported not having received prior training on how to avoid injury. The injury limited normal activities for at least 1 day for 68% of the subjects, and for more than a week for 25%; employment in retail trades, equipment use, lack of training and burn injuries were associated with increased limitation of normal activities. Results highlight target areas for intervention and evaluation. (66433)

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CIS 96-697 Respiratory symptoms and lung function in wool textile workers. Zuskin E., Mustajbegovic J., Schachter E.N., Kanceljak B., Godnic-Cvar J., Sitar-Srebocan V., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.845-857. 33 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0697.pdf

A questionnaire survey of respiratory symptoms among 216 wool textile workers and 130 non-exposed controls revealed a higher prevalence of all chronic respiratory symptoms in the wool workers. A high prevalence of acute symptoms associated with the work shift was also noted in the wool workers. Measurement of the wool workers' ventilatory capacity before and after the work shift revealed significant across-shift reductions. Dust concentrations were in general higher than those allowed by current Croatian standards. Dust exposure in wool textile mills may be associated with the development of chronic respiratory symptoms and impaired lung function. (66435)

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CIS 96-698 Factors in the sociocultural environment of child labourers: A study in a small scale leather goods industry in Calcutta. Mitra S., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dec. 1994, Vol.51, No.12, p.822-825. 7 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0698.pdf

During a study of the occupational health of child workers in several small leather workshops, investigation was made of the sociocultural factors that made it necessary for the children, aged between 7 and 14 years, to work. The psychosocial effects of the same factors were also investigated. Personal interviews were carried out with a prepared questionnaire, and the findings were compared between the working children and a control group of the same number of non-working children from the neighbourhood, matched for age, sex and religion. The foremost cause of taking up employment by the children was poverty. The overall effects found were deprivation of education, lowering of expectations and a blunting of mental faculties. Prolonged, monotonous work in childhood that precludes education and healthy recreation is harmful to children. (66839)

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CIS 96-699 Temporary workers in the nuclear industry. (French: Les intermittents du nucléaire) Doniol-Shaw G., Huez D., Sandret N., Octarès Editions, 24 rue de Nazareth, 31000 Toulouse, France, 1995. 250p. Price: FRF 180.00., ISBN 2-906769-20-7 (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0699.pdf

This book presents the results of the first stage of an epidemiologic study on temporary workers directly exposed to ionizing radiation while performing maintenance work during shut down procedures in French nuclear plants. The results of this survey highlight the repercussions of the working conditions on workers from contracting firms in this industry and the influence that factors specific to work organization have on their psychological and physical health. These data as a whole constitute also a reference for future surveys as well as being a prevention instrument and a tool for immediate action to modify work situations. (66970)

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CIS 96-700 The proposed removal of outdated agricultural health and safety legislation. Health and Safety Commission, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. 24p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0700.pdf

This consultation document invites views on the repeal/revocation of certain agricultural provisions identified during the Health and Safety Commission's review of regulations as being redundant. The legislation concerns threshers and balers, ladders, field machinery, safeguarding of workplaces and poisonous substances. The provisions to be revoked are described along with measures for the maintenance of health and safety standards by the use of more modern legislation. (66297)

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CIS 96-701 Occupational health and safety performance overviews, selected industries. Issue No.9 - Agriculture and services to agriculture industries. Cole B., Foley G., National Occupational Health and Safety Commission (Worksafe Australia), Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia, Dec. 1995. viii, 38p. Illus. 5 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0701.pdf

This report highlights potential safety and health problem areas in agriculture and services to agriculture industries in Australia. Statistics on occupational injuries and diseases are based on workers' compensation data for the year 1992-93 and are analyzed by agricultural sector, jurisdiction, occupation, age group and sex, and by the nature, bodily location, mechanism and agency of the injury or disease and by the time of accident. Time lost and costs are also analyzed. Safety and health performance was significantly poorer than in Australian industry in general; most occurrences were among agricultural labourers and sheep-shearers. (66373)

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CIS 96-702 Marine medical research collection: Extracts from the Japanese Journals of Maritime Medicine. SEMPOS (The Seamen's Insurance Foundation), 5-6 Shibuya 1-chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150, Japan, 1995. xvi, 744p. Illus. Bibl.ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0702.pdf

Translation from the Japanese of 134 research papers published during the period 1958-1994. The papers are classified according to the following topics: introduction to marine medicine; studies of the effects on the health of seamen of living on a ship; statistical studies of illnesses, injuries and accidents of seamen; studies on the health conditions of seamen's insurance pensioners; studies on medical counsel for ships at sea; studies on the care of sick and injured seamen at sea; studies of infectious diseases in seamen; studies of various issues related to illnesses, injuries and accidents among seamen; clinical studies of adult diseases among seamen; studies on the health care of seamen. In annex: future maritime medicine research topics. (66381)

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CIS 96-703 Mortality patterns in chemical workers. Kielkowski D., Coombs M., Department of National Health and Population Development, P.O. Box 4788, Johannesburg 2000, Republic of South Africa, 1995. iv, 18p. 7 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0703.pdf

Mortality patterns were investigated in 231 South African chemical workers who died between 1989 and 1993. Compared to the South African general male population, overall mortality was not elevated in either blacks or whites. In white workers, overall mortality by cause was increased for genito-urinary system diseases, circulatory diseases, lymphatic and haemopoietic tissue neoplasms and brain cancer. Black workers also showed increased mortality from genito-urinary causes and circulatory diseases. The consistent finding of increased mortality from non-malignant genito-urinary causes in both race groups warrants further investigation. (66620)

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CIS 96-704 Investigation of working conditions in the dyestuff and varnish industry. (Portuguese: Avaliação de condições de trabalho na indústria de tintas e vernizes) Mayan O., Instituto de Desenvolvimento e Inspecção das Condições de Trabalho, Pr. de Alvalade 1, 1700 Lisboa, Portugal, 1995. 31p. 11 ref., ISBN 972-704-129-9 (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0704.pdf

Contents of this monograph on working conditions in the dyestuff and varnish industry: definition of the industrial sector; methodology of the investigation: choosing the sample of plants to be investigated, hazard identification (main hazards: inhalation of chemicals, noise, thermal stress, contact with chemicals capable of penetration through the skin); risk quantification; results (concentration of pollutants with and without exposure hazard; noise levels); impact of the hazards encountered on workers' health; basic preventive strategies. (66653)

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CIS 96-705 Offshore safety research and development programme - Project handbooks 1993/94 and 1994/95. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1994 and 1996. xx, 178p. and xix, 137p. Index. Price: GBP 22.00 and GBP 17.50., ISBN 0-7176-0730-5, ISBN 0-7176-1090-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0705.pdf

These two handbooks provide information on research and development projects currently in progress or recently completed by the Offshore Safety Division of the Health and Safety Executive. Projects are listed under 17 programme areas. Information provided includes status, name and address of contractor, cost, and objectives and background of the project. Project keywords are indexed. (66936)

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CIS 96-706 The proposed removal of outdated textile and anthrax prevention health and safety legislation. Health and Safety Commission, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. 38p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0706.pdf

This consultation document invites views on the repeal/revocation of certain textile and anthrax prevention provisions identified during the Health and Safety Commission's review of regulations as being redundant. The legislation concerns artificial humidification, use of kiers and cotton shuttles in the textile industry and the Anthrax Prevention Order 1971. The provisions to be revoked are described along with measures for the maintenance of health and safety standards by the use of more modern legislation. A cost benefit assessment of the proposed revocation is presented. (66296)

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CIS 96-707 Working conditions of women in the nursing services of a hospital. (Spanish: Condiciones de trabajo de la mujer en el área de enfermería de un hospital) Algarín Fiestas M.I., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, C/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1995. 55p. Illus. 33 ref., ISBN 84-7425-432-9 (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0707.pdf

After an overview of the situation of women in the workforce in Europe, and in Spain in particular (proportion of women in the workforce, regional health strategy of the WHO, risk prevention and health promotion at the workplace, factors of work load - physical, mental, psychological and social), this document reviews various aspects of the work of nurses in hospitals: ergonomics of nursing work (tasks, physical environment, socio-occupational factors, secondary factors); past research into the matter). The survey itself concerned >1000 women working in a Sevilla hospital. Data were obtained from the personnel files of the hospital, answers to a questionnaire survey distributed to the women, and information obtained from interviews with about a quarter of the women. Results are presented in function of the age, job classification, professional category, married status, number of children, commuting time and availability of household help. Environmental factors that bothered more than half the women were high temperatures, standing at work >6h per day, bending down >10 times per hour; less than half were bothered by noise, inadequate lighting, conditions of the resting room and the service areas. Other areas explored by the survey included: mental and psychological stress, lack of proper training, lack of communication with superiors, dissatisfaction with the work schedule. The study ends with a list of suggested improvements. (66655)

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CIS 96-708 A report into safety at outdoor activity centres. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. vi, 38p. Illus. 18 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1144-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0708.pdf

This report presents the results of a programme of visits to 311 outdoor activity centres in the United Kingdom. Findings are discussed in relation to safety policy, risk assessments, instructor qualifications and training, maintenance of equipment, emergency procedures, accident reporting, and monitoring of safety standards. Overall, safety was well managed and legal requirements were met by most outdoor activity providers. At follow-up visits, providers were found to have taken required remedial actions. The proposed licensing scheme for certain activities should further improve safety standards in this sector. (66809)

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CIS 96-709 Technical rules on hazardous substances TRGS 520 - Building and operating sites for the collection of hazardous substances from households, commercial and public institutions. (German: Technische Regeln für Gefahrstoff TRGS 520 - Errichtung und Betrieb von Sammelstellen für gefährliche Abfälle aus Haushalten, gewerblichen und öffentlichen Einrichtungen) Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz, Wirtschaftsverlag NW, Verlag für neue Wissenschaft GmbH, Postfach 10 11 10, 27511 Bremerhaven, Germany, 1993. 27p., ISBN 3-89429-367-5 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0709.pdf

This publication in the series "Technical Rules for Hazardous Substances" deals with the construction and operation of stationary and mobile collection stations for harmful waste, in particular safe layout and design of such installations and of related equipment. Special regard is given to fire protection and fire fighting. Required qualifications of personnel operating the collection stations and protective measures for the personnel are outlined. For example, the required protective measures for personnel include: monitoring compliance with maximum allowable workplace concentrations and the supply of personal protective equipment. (66880)

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CIS 96-710 Approved code of practice for safety and health in tree work. Part 2: Maintenance of trees around power lines. Occupational Safety and Health Service, Department of Labour, P.O. Box 3705, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb. 1996. 80p. Illus. 25 ref. Price: NZD 10.00., ISBN 0-477-03591-4 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0710.pdf

This code of practice sets out safety requirements for pruning, maintaining and removing trees and for cutting scrub near electric live power lines. Contents: electrical hazards associated with tree work near overhead power lines; training of workers; general safety precautions; protective clothing; fire protection; minimum approach distances from live power lines; safe use of tools and equipment (elevating platform vehicles, ropes, ladders, safety harnesses, pruning tools); safe working methods (competent worker zone, close working zone). In appendix: basic electrical knowledge. (66803)

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CIS 96-711 Escape and rescue from mines. Health and Safety Commission, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. iv, 60p. Illus. Price: GBP 9.50., ISBN 0-7176-0939-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0711.pdf

This approved code of practice gives practical guidance on the Escape and Rescue from Mines Regulations 1995. Contents: general duties of owners, managers and employers; escape and emergency organization (emergency plan, emergency accommodation, emergency equipment, mine plans for emergency use, warning and other communication systems, arrangements for escape, training and information); general rescue duties; rescue team and conduct of rescue operations (selection and training of rescue team members, training in use of breathing apparatus, medical examination and fitness to undertake rescue work, role of rescue officers and manager). (66299)

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CIS 96-712 High-visibility clothing. (French: Vêtements de signalisation à haute visibilité) Organisme professionnel de prévention du bâtiment et des travaux publics, Cahiers des Comités de prévention du bâtiment et des travaux publics, Nov.-Dec. 1995, No.6, 4p. Insert. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0712.pdf

Safety data sheet concerning the characteristics of high-visibility work clothing to be worn for by construction workers going about on foot on construction sites in France. Such workers are in fact "obstacles" for normal drivers as well as for the operators of construction equipment and vehicles, which is why they must wear highly visible clothing. Dimensioned designs of such clothing, based on French standard NF EN 471, illustrate the text. (66332)

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CIS 96-713 Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994: The health and safety plan during the construction phase; The health and safety file. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. 6p. 5 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0713.pdf

These two information sheets provide guidance on specific aspects of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994 (see CIS 95-13). The required content of the construction phase health and safety plan is outlined including requirements for the specification of arrangements for managing and organizing the project. The required content of the health and safety file (information for the client or end user) is also outlined along with its future use. (66342)

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CIS 96-714 Workplace design: Obligations of the contractor - Regulations. (French: Conception des lieux de travail: obligations des maîtres d'ouvrage - Réglementation) Leroy A., Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1st ed., 1994. 80p. Illus. Index., ISBN 2-7389-0328-2 (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0714.pdf

This documents contains a summary of the legal responsibilities of construction contractors, architects and others in France concerning the safe design and layout of workplaces. These responsibilities include: siting, on-site traffic, fire protection, ventilation, heating, lighting, personnel welfare facilities. (66756)

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CIS 96-715 Contractors in schools: Information for head teachers, school governors and bursars. Health and Safety Commission, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Feb. 1996. 10p. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0715.pdf

This leaflet provides guidance on health and safety aspects related to the use of contractors in schools. Duties and responsibilities of employers and contractors are outlined along with guidance on selecting the contractor, planning, organizing and controlling the work, contract completion, and the requirements of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994 (see CIS 95-13). (66762)

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CIS 96-716 Elements of a laboratory health and safety management system. Division of Workplace Health and Safety, Department of Employment, Vocational Education, Training and Industrial Relations, Forbes House, 30 Makerston Street, Brisbane, Queensland 4000, Australia, 1994. 68p. 18 ref. Price: AUD 5.00., ISBN 0-7242-5799-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0716.pdf

This guide provides advice for managers and operators of laboratories on the development of an effective health and safety management system. Contents: policies and procedures; employee consultation; quality assurance in health and safety; information and training; risk management principles; types of hazard and their control; animal handling; storage and transport of hazardous substances; waste management; emergency planning; records and documentation; safety audit principles and methods. (66666)

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CIS 96-717 Facts for freelances: Health and safety in broadcasting and the performing arts. Health and Safety Executive, Joint Advisory Committee for Broadcasting and the Performing Arts, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Jan. 1995. 19p. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0717.pdf

This leaflet provides guidance on accident prevention in broadcasting and the performing arts where much of the work is done by freelance personnel. Contents: basic safety and health guidelines; risk assessment; legal duties of employers, the self-employed, suppliers and others; responsibilities of freelances; safety checklist. (66763)

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CIS 96-718 RIDDOR offshore. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Apr. 1996. 10p. 1 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0718.pdf

This booklet outlines the requirements of the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR) (see CIS 95-1930) as they relate to offshore workers. Brief guidance is given on reportable events and the person responsible for reporting; the reporting procedure and time allowed for reporting; record keeping; types of major injuries, dangerous occurrences and diseases to be reported. A sample reporting form is included. (66806)

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CIS 96-719 Construction handbook: Prevention of occupational accidents and diseases in the construction and civil engineering sector. (French: Aide-mémoire BTP - Prévention des accidents du travail et des maladies professionnelles dans le bâtiment et les travaux publics) Voisin J.C., Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, 1995. 127p. Illus. Index., ISBN 2-7389-0380-0 (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0719.pdf

The aim of this amply illustrated handbook is to help communications among all those concerned with safety and health on construction sites in France, in part by providing an overview of relevant legislation in effect at the end of 1994, with particular attention paid to the Law of 31 Dec. 1993 on temporary or mobile construction sites. Main topics covered: general safety organization (accident and disease prevention, regulations, organizations concerned, site coordination); safety measures within the enterprise (obligations, support available to management, rules relating to employment conditions, personal protective equipment, responsibilities and penalties); technical measures (construction site organization, materials and equipment, hazards, welfare facilities, first aid). (66757)

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[ Top of page ]

004 New technologies

CIS 96-720 An ergonomic design and performance evaluation of handy scanners by males. Lee Y.H., Weng J., Applied Ergonomics, Dec. 1995, Vol.26, No.6, p.425-430. Illus. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0720.pdf

Three types of hand scanner were evaluated in terms of performance, posture used, strain on the forearm musculature and subjective ratings. The two commercially available models required a thumb-forefinger side grip or a thumb-finger grip; a proposed model, based on ergonomic design considerations, required a thumb-finger-palmar grip. Performance evaluation by 19 male subjects indicated that the proposed model resulted in a higher success rate, a shorter completion time, the smallest self-selected working area, least strain on the forearm muscles, and highest subjective ratings. Results justify the consideration of ergonomic factors in future scanner design. (66470)

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CIS 96-721 Ergonomic organization of workstations equipped with a VDU terminal or a computer. (Portuguese: Organização ergonômica do posto de trabalho com terminal ou com microcomputador) de Araújo Couto H., Revista CIPA, Feb. 1996, Vol.17, No.195, p.72-74. Illus. (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0721.pdf

Contents of this ergonomic treatment of VDU work: basic layout of VDU workstations; ergonomic issues of particular types of VDU work (data entry, word processing, computer-based information, desktop publishing); general work involving computers (e.g. managers, administrative personnel etc.). (66493)

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CIS 96-722 Compensatory rest breaks for VDT operators. Henning R.A., Kissel G.V., Maynard D.C., International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Oct. 1994, Vol.14, No.5, p.243-249, 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0722.pdf

Discomfort associated with continuous visual display terminal (VDT) use can be moderated by short rest breaks at 10 or 15-min intervals. This laboratory study evaluated an alternative break administration system in which operators only received short breaks when their spontaneous rest pauses were inadequate. Typists (n=38) were assigned to one of two conditions, regimented (20sec breaks every 5min) or compensatory (20sec breaks every 5min if spontaneous pauses totalled less than 17sec), during a 48-min period. Although the number and length of computer-administered breaks decreased in the compensatory condition, no differences in work performance, operator mood, or acceptance of the break system were found. However, back discomfort was lower in the compensatory condition. These findings suggest that a compensatory rest break system can eliminate unnecessary task interruptions and be as effective as a regimented break schedule in ensuring that operators do not perform computer work continuously. (66624)

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CIS 96-723 Computer-aided design (CAD) tasks - Physical factors and ergonomic guidelines. (French: Tâches de conception assistée par ordinateur - Environnement physique et dimensionnement du poste) Cail F., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1995, No.161, Note No.2005-161-95, p.489-496. Illus. 21 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0723.pdf

Workplaces representing different types of computer-aided design tasks were analyzed in eight firms. The data gathered concern the equipment used, data presentation, workplace dimensions and the physical environment. As a rule, the optical quality of VDU screens is good. Workplace design and layout, however, are not always suitable for CAD tasks. Specific ergonomic guidelines are proposed for CAD work. (66864)

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CIS 96-724 Techno-stress: A prospective psychophysiological study of the impact of a controlled stress-reduction program in advanced telecommunication systems design work. Arnetz B.B., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.38, No.1, p.53-65. Illus. 43 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0724.pdf

A group of advanced telecommunication systems design workers participated in one of three stress-reduction training programmes based on relaxation techniques. Psychophysiological assessments were carried out before and after the programme. Compared to a reference group, the intervention group showed a significant improvement with regard to circulating levels of the stress-sensitive hormone prolactin, an attenuation in mental strain, improvement in cardiovascular risk factors and a decrease in circulating thrombocytes. The type of programme chosen did not affect the results. While the programmes alleviated some of the stress in these workers, more attention should be paid to the design of healthy work environments. (66615)

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CIS 96-725 Internet - A must for OSH specialists. (French: Internet - Voie incontournable pour les spécialistes en SST) Richards R., Travail et santé, June 1996, Vol.12, No.2, p.53-56. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0725.pdf

This article issued following a seminar held in March 1996 in Montreal (Canada) highlights the numerous possibilities offered by the Internet for research on prevention. Three sites are presented with relevant data (addresses, access, specialty, etc.): that of Turva in Finland, SIRI of the University of Vermont in the USA, that of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) in Hamilton (Ontario) and an additional site specialized in ergonomics (ERGOWEB) of the University of Utah (USA). The advantages of the Internet for OSH specialists are outlined as are its drawbacks, including the fact that research on the net can be very time-consuming. (66969)

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CIS 96-726 Work with robots. (Portuguese: O trabalho com robots) Faria M.G.L., Instituto de Desenvolvimento e Inspecção das Condições de Trabalho, Pr. de Alvalade 1, 1700 Lisboa, Portugal, 1996. 39p. 18 ref., ISBN 972-704-132-9 (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0726.pdf

Contents of this introduction to the relationship between robots and the workplace: the position of labour unions and the attitude of workers towards automation in the workplace; types of robots and levels of automation (variations in the "teaching" of robots, principal robot control systems, characteristics of robot movement); advantages of robot use; disadvantages of robot use and methods for reducing them; safety and robot use (work areas, programming and maintenance, theoretical and practical training of workers); robots in Portugal. (66657)

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CIS 96-727 Information technology in production engineering. (German: Informationstechnologie in der Fertigungstechnik) Schreiber P., Kuhn K., Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz, Wirtschaftsverlag NW, Postfach 10 11 10, 27511 Bremerhaven, Germany, 1995. ix, 137p. Illus. 27 ref. Price: DM 27.50., ISBN 3-89429-633-X (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0727.pdf

The influence of new hardware and software technologies on production engineering and occupational safety and health is described. The following new technologies are covered: speech recognition and speech synthesis; pattern recognition; mobile robots; neuronal networks. These technologies have made the tasks of employees more intellectually complex and demanding. Employees who can cope with new tasks are of greater value to the company. Accidents and work-related illnesses have a greater impact and make safety and health promotion in companies more important. (66902)

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CIS 96-728 Computer control and human error. Kletz T., Chung P., Broomfield E., Shen-Orr C., Institution of Chemical Engineers, Davis Building, 165-189 Railway Terrace, Rugby CV21 3HQ, United Kingdom, 1995. vii, 120p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 32.00., ISBN 0-85295-362-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0728.pdf

This book describes incidents which have occurred in computer-controlled process plants and suggests actions for their prevention. Incidents are classified as: equipment faults; software faults; treating the computer as a 'black box' which will do what is required without the need to understand how; misjudging the way operators respond to the computer; errors in data entered in the computer; failure to tell operators of changes in data or programmes; and interference with hardware or software. The application of hazard and operability (HAZOP) studies to computer-controlled process plants is described and a final chapter examines reasons why computer-controlled systems fail. (66371)

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[ Top of page ]

005 Chemical safety

CIS 96-729 Neurobehavioral effects of long-term exposure to xylene and mixed organic solvents in shipyard spray painters. Ruijten M.W.M.M., Hooisma J., Brons J.T., Habets C.E.P., Emmen H.H., Muijser H., Neurotoxicology, Fall 1994, Vol.15, No.3, p.613-620. 33 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0729.pdf

A cross-sectional study was performed in shipyard painters exposed to organic solvents and age-matched referents. The work duties of the painters mainly involved spray painting with solvent-based paints containing > 50% xylene. Results indicate that complaints regarding mood changes, equilibrium and fatigue were more severe in painters than in controls, but were not related to the estimated life-time exposure index. Decreased nerve function was observed in the lower extremities and to some extent in the upper extremities. The refractory period appeared to be a sensitive parameter in motor nerves. Most neurophysiological parameters investigated were significantly related to the exposure index. Behavioural testing revealed impairment of simple visuo-motor performance and complex perceptual coding. A relationship between effects on perceptual coding and the exposure index was also demonstrated. (66644)

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CIS 96-730 Performance of painting booths equipped with down-draft ventilation. Goyer N., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Mar. 1995, Vol.56, No.3, p.258-265. Illus. 14 ref. ### (In English)

(67039)

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CIS 96-731 Lead, chromium, and cadmium emission factors during abrasive blasting operations by bridge painters. Conroy L.M., Menezes Lindsay R.M., Sullivan P.M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Mar. 1995, Vol.56, No.3, p.266-271. 26 ref. ### (In English)

(67040)

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CIS 96-732 Sampling and analysis of isocyanates in spray-painting operations. Rudzinski W.E., Dahlquist B., Svejda S.A., Richardson A., Thomas T., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Mar. 1995, Vol.56, No.3, p.284-289. 26 ref. ### (In English)

(67043)

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CIS 96-733 Occupational exposures to fibers and quartz at 19 crushed stone mining and milling operations. Kullman G.J., Greife A.L., Costello J., Hearl F.J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.641-660. Illus. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0733.pdf

Occupational exposure at 19 crushed stone operations was evaluated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) during the period 1979 to 1982. Asbestos fibres were detected at one traprock facility; most samples were below permissible limits. A variety of other silicate mineral fibres were detected in traprock operations and at one granite operation. Overexposure to crystalline silica was detected at 16 of the 19 operations studied; mill operators and labourers consistently had the highest and most frequent overexposure. It is considered that a significant silicosis risk and a potential lung cancer risk exists for workers in this industry. Glossary of terms. (66312)

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CIS 96-734 Orientation bias of the isolated 10-mm nylon cyclone at low stream velocity. Kar K., Gautam M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1090-1098. Illus. 37 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0734.pdf

The sampling efficiency of a 10-mm Dorr-Oliver nylon cyclone was determined in an open circuit wind tunnel. Polydispersed anthracite coal particles were fed into the tunnel and measurements were made for different sampler orientations and sampling flow rates. The bias was found to be maximum at the 0° orientation, followed by 90° and 180° orientations. A negative bias of -51% was found at a sampling flow rate of 2.0L/min. Results highlight the shortcomings of the sampler which is used extensively in dust compliance monitoring in US coal mines. (66324)

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CIS 96-735 Rapid determination of metal particles on air sampling filters using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Arnold S.D., Cremers D.A., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1180-1186. Illus. 17 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0735.pdf

A rapid method of analysis for metal particles is described. Thallium particles (in the form of thallic oxide) were collected by passing contaminated air through a filter or by wiping a contaminated surface with a filter. The mass of thallium particles on the filters was determined in less than one minute using a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique: a series of laser sparks was formed across the filter surface which vaporized the particles and excited the resulting atoms; thallium was detected by temporally and spectrally resolving the spark light. The method may be developed for the analysis of other types of metal particles. (66412)

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CIS 96-736 Respirable free silica: A comparison of the occupational exposure limits. Wlliams P.L., Parker M.S., Middendorf P.J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1229-1231. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0736.pdf

Three commonly used occupational exposure limits for respirable (quartz) silica are compared: the ACGIH threshold limit value (TLV), the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL), and the OSHA permissible exposure level (PEL). The significance of the differences in these values at various airborne concentrations is discussed. Silica is the only substance with an established OSHA PEL that (depending on the concentration present) can be below, exceed, or equal the ACGIH TLV or NIOSH REL values. Thus, compliance with the silica TLV or REL does not always result in compliance with the OSHA PEL. (66419)

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CIS 96-737 Airway responsiveness to methacholine, respiratory symptoms, and dust exposure levels in grain and flour mill workers in eastern France. Massin N., Bohadana A.B., Wild P., Kolopp-Sarda M.N., Toamain J.P., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.859-869. 35 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0737.pdf

A study of respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function and airway responsiveness to methacholine was carried out among 118 workers in 11 grain and flour mills in eastern France. Dust concentrations were measured by personal sampling. There was a greater prevalence of pulmonary symptoms (chronic cough/phlegm and chronic bronchitis) among the mill workers than among a non-exposed control group; the prevalence of chronic bronchitis was significantly related to cumulative dust exposure. Results of the methacholine airway challenge test revealed a significant relation between dust exposure and airway hyper-responsiveness. Mill workers exposed to grain and flour dust are at risk of developing respiratory symptoms and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. (66436)

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CIS 96-738 Asbestos-induced visceral pleural fibrosis reduces pulmonary compliance. Valkila E.H., Nieminen M.M., Moilanen A.K., Kuusisto P.A., Lahdensuo A.H.S., Karvonen J.I., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.363-372. Illus. 25 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0738.pdf

In a study of 59 asbestos-exposed construction workers with asbestos-related changes on chest radiographs, visceral pleural fibrosis (VPF) was diagnosed in 29 subjects: seven had only VPF, 17 had VPF and pleural plaques and five had VPF, plaques and asbestosis. Pulmonary function testing revealed that subjects with VPF had significantly lower static and dynamic compliance values than those without VPF. Other respiratory function variables failed to show any significant differences. It was concluded that measurement of static and dynamic compliance is a useful method in assessing pulmonary function impairment caused by visceral pleural fibrosis. (66515)

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CIS 96-739 Three cases of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia with bullae seen in schoolteachers. Ohtsuka Y., Munakata M, Homma Y., Masaki Y., Ohe M, Doi I., Amishima M, Kimura K., Ishikura H., Yoshiki T., Kawakami Y., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.425-435. Illus. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0739.pdf

Three cases are presented of Japanese school teachers with chronic interstitial pneumonia and multiple bullae throughout the lungs. Analysis of lung mineral contents revealed that the deposition of total dust, inorganic dust, non-silica inorganic dust and calcium was higher than that in four control cases with the same disease; the amount of free silica in one case and alpha-quartz in another were also higher than in the controls. Much of the chalk produced in Japan is still made from gypsum with small amounts of silica and other minerals, in addition to calcium. Findings indicate the deposition of chalk in the lungs of these patients. (66520)

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CIS 96-740 Causation, impairment, disability: An analysis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis evaluations. Prince T.S., Frank A.L., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.38, No.1, p.77-82. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0740.pdf

Impairment evaluation data for a group of 374 coal miners who filed for disability for coalworkers' pneumoconiosis were reviewed. Several pulmonary function variables declined in association with years mining, even after controlling for smoking and roentgenograph findings of pneumoconiosis. Of the 203 cases settled, 157 (77%) received some kind of disability payment, although only 49 (24%) had a roentgenograph positive for pneumoconiosis. Among 59 with completely normal roentgenographs and pulmonary function tests, 38 received some disability award. Findings support development of a more rational impairment/disability system for those with potential coal dust disease. (66618)

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CIS 96-741 Epidemiology studies of synthetic vitreous fibers: Methods used and current studies. Chiazze L., Watkins D.K., Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, Dec. 1994, Vol.20, No.3, Pt.2, p.S58-S67. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0741.pdf

Epidemiologic designs (case control, cohort, and surveillance) and measures of association are discussed in the context of studies in the synthetic vitreous fibres industry. Current investigations are described. The importance of internal validity and the need to account for confounding are demonstrated. Estimates of the prevalence of smoking have been used to adjust a previously reported statistically significant lung cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for an Owens-Corning company plant. After adjusting for the confounding effect of cigarette smoking, the Owens-Corning SMR based on national mortality rates is reduced to a statistically insignificant 107.7. While smoking does not account for all of the excess lung cancer mortality in this population compared to US mortality, these investigations show that plant exposures including respirable glass fibres are not responsible for the remaining excess. (66638)

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CIS 96-742 A multiyear workplace-monitoring program for refractory ceramic fibers. Maxim L.D., Kelly W.P., Walters T., Waugh R., Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, Dec. 1994, Vol.20, No.3, Pt.2, p.S200-S215. Illus. 46 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0742.pdf

This paper summarizes interim results of a five-year workplace monitoring programme conducted by firms belonging to the Refractory Ceramic Fibers Coalition (RCFC) pursuant to a Consent Agreement with the US EPA. This paper reviews the refractory ceramic fibre (RCF) industry, findings of animal bioassay and epidemiological investigations, and the regulatory approach used by EPA. In brief, the programme will gather 720 time-weighted average (TWA) workplace concentration measurements annually, partitioned among eight functional job classifications, both from plants that manufacture and from those that process or use RCF. Statistical analyses reveal that: workplace airborne RCF concentration data are approximately log-normally distributed; 93% of workplace TWAs are beneath the industry's recommended exposure guideline of one fibre per cubic centimetre; there are significant differences in average workplace RCF concentrations among job types. (66639)

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CIS 96-743 Dispersion of respirable aerosols in a fermenter and their removal in an exhaust system. Juozaitis A., Huang Y.L., Willeke K., Donnelly J., Kalatoor S., Leeson A., Wyza R., Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, Aug. 1994, Vol.9, No.8, p.552-559. Illus. 28 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0743.pdf

To study the potential release of aerosols from a fermenter, a measurement system was developed to explore respirable aerosol formation characteristics and controllability. The data indicated that the majority of effluent aerosol particles released were in the submicrometer range. This includes bacteria and growth products. Particle concentration counts in the exhaust system increased by a factor of 100 during the fermentation process. This dramatic increase was shown to correlate with bacterial growth, foaming, and subsequent breaking of the uppermost foam layer into small droplets by the mechanical foam breaker. The ceramic filter in the exhaust system of the fermenter removed over 98% of the aerosol particles by count larger than 0.7µm diameter, but up to 50% by count of the 0.1 to 0.3µm particles were released into the ambient air. Thus, while the exhaust removes most of the particle mass, extremely small bacteria may escape to the environment. (66649)

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CIS 96-744 Exposure to asbestos and man-made mineral fibres. Nationwide investigation in the construction and civil engineering sectors. (French: Exposition à l'amiante et aux fibres minérales artificielles. Enquête nationale dans le bâtiment et les travaux publics) Abecassis J.C., Ministère du Travail (France), Documents pour le médecin du travail, 2nd Quarter 1995, No.62, p.107-112. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0744.pdf

The purpose of this nationwide investigation conducted in France was to arrive at a better understanding of current levels of risk tied to the utilization of natural (asbestos) and artificial (rock wool, glass wool, brass, ceramic) fibres in the construction industry. Conclusions: the risk of asbestosis is present in various work situations; there is a real risk to workers near construction sites; work in enclosed spaces can be a hazard to workers, who are often unaware of the risk; there is a large number of workers who are habitually exposed, and there is an almost complete lack of environmental measurement data concerning such situations. The primary role of information and training in making workers aware of the risk is stressed. (66696)

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CIS 96-745 Asbestos bodies in lung tissue following exposure to crocidolite. Williams V., de Klerk N.H., Whitaker D., Musk A.W., Shilkin K.B., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.489-495. 11 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0745.pdf

Routine asbestos body counts in lung tissue from 206 autopsies in Western Australia were analyzed. Counts for 32 cases who had worked in the asbestos industry (mining and milling of crocidolite) correlated well with estimates of their cumulative airborne exposure to crocidolite fibres. No other exposure variables, including time since ceasing exposure or age, had any significant effects on body count. It is concluded that the relatively simple technique of light microscopy for counting asbestos bodies in lung tissue provides a reliable indication of past occupational exposure to crocidolite in subjects whose exposure has been only to crocidolite. (66733)

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CIS 96-746 Altered partition of T cell subsets in the peripheral blood of healthy workers exposed to flour dust. Kolopp-Sarda M.N., Bene M.C., Massin N., Wild P., Faure G.C., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.497-504. 24 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0746.pdf

Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets were investigated in 34 bakers and 82 millers exposed to wheat flour dust, and in 51 unexposed controls. The mill workers showed a significantly altered partition of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets. Milder differences were noted between the controls and the bakers, who were exposed to lower concentrations of flour dust. Both groups of flour-exposed workers, however, appeared to have higher white blood cell counts than controls. It is suggested that these subtle adjustments of the immune system to environmental challenges could be responsible for the overall healthy state of the workers observed. (66734)

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CIS 96-747 Industrial fibres - A technical and commercial review. Hodgson A.A., Annals of Occupational Hygiene, Apr.1993, Vol.37, No.2, p.203-210. 8 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0747.pdf

Properties, costs and availabilities are reviewed for a number of raw materials in current use, or having potential use, as replacements for asbestos fibre. These include: glass fibres and mineral wools; ceramic or refractory fibres; a number of minerals in fibrous or particulate form; some specific synthetic and natural organic fibres. The appendices summarize the comparative costs, availabilities and properties of the alternative raw materials, and a tabulation of fibrous and particulate materials used in major product groups (fibre reinforced cement, insulation materials, friction materials, reinforced plastics, etc.). (66745)

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CIS 96-748 Radiographic abnormalities and mortality in subjects with exposure to crocidolite. de Klerk N.H., Musk A.W., Cookson W.O.C.M., Glancy J.J., Hobbs M.S.T., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1993, Vol.50, No.10, p.902-906. Illus. 22 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0748.pdf

Plain chest radiographs from a one in six random sample of the workforce of the asbestos industry at Wittenoom, Western Australia, between 1943 and 1966, were classified for degree of profusion and pleural thickening by two independent observers according to the 1980 UICC-ILO Classification of Radiographs. The aim was to clarify the effect of degree of radiological abnormality on survival. A total of 1,106 subjects were selected, the age, cumulative exposure to crocidolite, and time since first exposure of each being determined from employment records. The study showed that the degree of radiographic abnormality has an independent effect on mortality from malignant mesothelioma, asbestosis, and all causes even after allowing for the effects of age, degree of exposure, and time since first exposure. (66747)

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CIS 96-749 Further evidence of human silica nephrotoxicity in occupationally exposed workers. Ng T.P., Lee H.S., Phoon W.H., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1993, Vol.50, No.10, p.907-912. Illus. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0749.pdf

It has previously been shown that granite workers with heavy exposure to silica had glomerular and proximal tubular dysfunction evidenced by increased urinary excretions of albumin. The investigation was replicated in another group of granite workers to further elucidate the exposure effect relation. The urinary excretion of albumin, α-1-microglobulin (AMG), β-2-microglobulin (BMG), and β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG) was determined in two groups of granite workers with low and high exposure to silica. Low molecular weight proteinuria and enzymuria were significantly correlated with duration of exposure in the high but not the low exposure group. These increases were most pronounced in those with 10 or more years of heavy exposure, and in those with radiological evidence of pulmonary fibrosis, particularly those with rounded small opacities denoting classical silicosis. These results provide further evidence that prolonged and heavy exposure to silica is associated with nephrotoxic effects in granite workers. (66748)

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CIS 96-750 A numerical study of dispersion and local exhaust capture of aerosols generated from a variety of sources and airflow conditions. Madsen U., Fontaine J.R., Nielsen P.V., Aubertin G., Breum N.O., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.134-141. Illus. 21 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0750.pdf

A numerical model was developed to describe the effect of aerosol source and airflow conditions on the dispersion and local exhaust capture of aerosol contaminants. Parameters discussed include particle diameter, density and initial velocity, the influence of obstacles and airflow patterns, particle relaxation time, aerodynamic diameter, and stopping distance. It was concluded that local exhaust capture of passively emitted particles can be described by particle relaxation time and the vertical air velocity at the emission point. The influence of particle initial velocity is limited compared to imposed airflow conditions. (66773)

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CIS 96-751 Aspiration efficiency and inlet wall deposition in the fiber sampling cassette. Chen C.C., Baron P.A., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.142-152. Illus. 50 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0751.pdf

Use of the 25-mm diameter sampling cassette with a 50-mm long conductive inlet may result in fibre deposits in the inlet rather than on the collection filter. A semiempirical model was used to calculate aspiration efficiency and inlet deposition for compact particles. Results of the model agreed well with laboratory measurements, but field measurements of fibres showed higher inlet deposition than predicted. Some of this additional deposition not predicted by the model may be due to extrapolation outside the model's original range, but may also be due to electrostatic effects or sample handling. Recommendations are made for sampling with this type of cassette. (66774)

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CIS 96-752 Evaluation of a chemical spot-test kit for the detection of airborne particulate lead in the workplace. Ashley K., Fischbach T.J., Song R., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.161-165. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0752.pdf

In an evaluation of a rhodizonate-based spot-test kit, more than 350 air samples were collected at abrasive blasting lead paint abatement sites. Filter samples were tested with the kit and then analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Experimental data were statistically modelled to estimate the performance parameters of the kit. The identification limit of the kit was approximately 3.6µg/filter sample. 95% confidence of a positive reading was found for lead mass values above approximately 10µg Pb/filter; 95% confidence of a negative reading was found for lead masses below approximately 0.6µg Pb/filter. The kit may be used for on-site screening of lead in workplace air. (66776)

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CIS 96-753 Exposure to airborne metals in the manufacture and maintenance of hard metal and stellite blades. Linnainmaa M., Kangas J., Kalliokoski P., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996. Vol.57, No.2, p.196-201. Illus. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0753.pdf

A study of exposure to airborne metals during blade servicing (resharpening) in 16 workplaces in Finland showed that workers grinding hard metal blades may be exposed to high levels of airborne cobalt, even when airborne total dust concentrations are low. The respirable portion of the total dust was high. Most of the airborne cobalt was water-soluble, but there were also solid particles containing cobalt and other metals in the workplace air. The mean concentration of cobalt in the grinding coolants was high. Concentrations of all other metals were low. Recommendations include enclosure of grinding machines, local exhaust ventilation and use of coolants which dissolve lower amounts of cobalt. (66801)

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CIS 96-754 Asbestos removal in an office building - Efficacy of personal protection. (French: Opérations de désamiantage dans un immeuble de bureaux - Efficacité de la protection individuelle) Villa M., Hubert G., Lima S., Kauffer E., Héry M., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1995, No.161, Note No.2002-161-95, p.463-467. Illus. 9 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0754.pdf

Workplace protection factors (WPFs) were determined for a powered respiratory protective device using four different power units in succession during the removal of sprayed asbestos in an office building. The test subjects concerned wore clothing specially designed for airtightness at the arm, leg and neck joints. The paper describes working conditions, WFP determination methods and difficulties encountered: asbestos removal methods, decontamination, air sampling (duration, flow variation, filter installation). All exposure levels measured were below the chrysotile limit value. The most conclusive test results were obtained with a power unit that gave WPFs of between 400 and 10,000, most readings being in excess of 3,000. The study highlights the importance of the right personal protection for the working conditions concerned, but no explanation was found for the poorest efficiency levels: the test procedure was identical in every case and no particular incidents were reported. (66861)

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CIS 96-755 Deposition and retention of inhaled fibres: Effects on incidence of lung cancer and mesothelioma. Lippmann M., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dec. 1994, Vol.51, No.12, p.793-798. Illus. 35 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0755.pdf

A review of the literature on chronic inhalation studies in which rats were exposed to mineral fibres at known fibre number concentrations was undertaken to examine the specific roles of fibre length and composition on the incidence of both lung cancer and mesothelioma. For lung cancer, the percentage of lung tumours (y) could be described by a relation of the form y = a + bf + cf2, where f is the concentration of fibre numbers and a, b and c are fitted constants. The correlation coefficients seemed to be independent of fibre type. By contrast, for mesothelioma, the (low) tumour yields seemed to be highly dependent upon fibre type. Combining the data from various studies by fibre type, the percentage of mesotheliomas was 0.6% for Zimbabwe (Rhodesian) chrysotile, 2.5% for the various amphiboles as a group and 4.7% for Quebec (Canadian) chrysotile. (66875)

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CIS 96-756 Malignant mesothelioma: Attributable risk of asbestos exposure. Spirtas R., Heineman E.F., Bernstein L., Beebe G.W., Keehn R.J., Stark A., Harlow B.L., Benichou J., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dec. 1994, Vol.51, No.12, p.804-811. 66 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0756.pdf

A case-control study of malignant mesothelioma was evaluated through patterns of exposure to asbestos based upon information from telephone interviews with next of kin. Potential cases, identified from medical files and death certificates, included all people diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma and registered during 1975-1980 by the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program, the New York State Cancer Registry (excluding New York City), and 39 large Veterans Administration hospitals. Cases whose diagnosis was confirmed in a special pathology review as definite or probable mesothelioma (n=208) were included in the analysis. Among men with pleural mesothelioma or peritoneal cancer, the attributable risk (AR) for exposure to asbestos was 88% and 58%, respectively. For women (both sites combined), the AR was 23%. Most of the pleural and peritoneal mesotheliomas in the men studied were attributable to exposure to asbestos. The situation in women was less definitive. (66877)

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CIS 96-757 Comparison of aerosol sampling with shrouded and unshrouded probes. Chandra S., McFarland A.R., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, May 1995, Vol.56, No.5, p.459-466. Illus. 27 ref. ### (In English)

(67052)

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CIS 96-758 Numerical simulation of unflanged rectangular exhaust openings. Kulmala I., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1099-1106. Illus. 22 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0758.pdf

The accuracy of computer simulations of turbulent airflows into exhaust hood openings is examined. Airflow fields generated by rectangular exhaust openings with aspect ratios 1:1, 4:3, 2:1, and 3:1 were calculated using the FLUENT computer code and a standard turbulence model. The effect of free-stream boundaries on the simulations was studied. The agreement between numerical simulations and experimental measurements was good for openings with aspect ratios 1:1 and 4:3 and satisfactory for the others under certain conditions. The model can be used to predict the flow into exhaust openings with reasonable accuracy if the modelling parameters are chosen correctly. (66325)

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CIS 96-759 Evaluation of capture efficiencies of large push-pull ventilation systems with both visual and tracer techniques. Woods J.N., McKarns J.S., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1208-1214. Illus. 4 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0759.pdf

The contaminant capture efficiencies of push-pull ventilation systems fitted to twenty large open-surface metal finishing tanks were tested using videotaped smoke testing and novel tracer gas methods. Real-time infrared detection of sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas permitted convenient adjustment of air flows for optimum capture efficiency. The careful control of cross-drafts was the most significant factor for contaminant capture at tank liquid surfaces. The ventilation systems were therefore modified to reduce air flow rates and redirect air flows. These modifications also reduced noise levels and system energy requirements. (66416)

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CIS 96-760 Method for the measurement of ventilation efficiency in office buildings. (French: Méthode pour la mesure de l'efficacité de ventilation dans les édifices à bureaux) Auger M., Farant J.P., Travail et santé, June 1996, Vol.12, No.2, p.S-9 to S-12. Illus. 9 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0760.pdf

Ventilation efficiency is a measure of the ability of a ventilation system to circulate air and to dilute pollutants. The ASHRAE standard recommends 10L/s/person as an acceptable value for fresh air to occupants. This rate however must be increased if the air does not circulate adequately. A new method has been developed in a test chamber to measure efficiency by simulating the CO2 generated by the occupants. The method consists of a 0.3L/minute injection of CO2 towards a CO2 monitor. This corresponds to the average production rate of CO2 from a sedentary human being. The efficiency is calculated by taking the difference between the maximum concentration obtained during the injection and the concentration before the injection. Results are presented for room/supply temperature difference of 6°C and 9°C and for air velocities of 0.07m/s and 0.45m/s. In all cases, the ventilation rate was fixed at 19L/s. Efficiencies varied by a factor of 1.5 for supply temperature changes and by a factor of 6 for air velocities. Since the method is different from existing methods, results are compared on a relative basis. This method responds to the mixing conditions in the room but additional research needs to be done by varying air flow rates. It is easy to use and can be easily applied in field conditions. (66869)

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CIS 96-761 Occupational exposure of deck crews to carcinogenic agents on crude oil tankers. Moen B.E., Hollund B.E., Berntsen M., Flo R., Kyvik K.R., Riise T., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1995, Vol.27, No.4, p.555-564. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0761.pdf

Exposure to carcinogenic agents was examined on the decks of six Norwegian crude oil tankers in harbours in Norway and the USA. Technical arrangements and the work on deck were observed during loading and unloading. Air monitoring of benzene, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and some aldehydes showed that the levels of these carcinogens were low, probably because of the closed loading systems in use on all tankers. A questionnaire survey of the crewmen revealed irritative and central nervous system symptoms which were probably due to other chemical agents. Painting with paint that contained lead chromate (a known carcinogen) was frequently carried out without protective clothing. (66289)

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CIS 96-762 Relationship between locations of chromosome breaks induced by vinyl chloride monomer and lymphocytosis. Fučić A., Hitrec V., Garaj-Vrhovac V., Barkovic D., Kubelka D., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1995, Vol.27, No.4, p.565-571. 33 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0762.pdf

The distribution of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM)-induced chromosome breaks was studied in cultured lymphocytes of 20 workers in a polyvinyl chloride plant. VCM concentration was 1ppm, periodically reaching 300ppm for a short period. The examined workers had considerably higher values of chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges than did a non-exposed control group. Exposure to VCM caused lymphocytosis together with disturbances of mitogenic activity in lymphocytes stimulated by phytohaemagglutinin. Results of G-banding showed that sites of chromosome breakpoints caused by VCM can be related to lymphatic tissue disorders. Lymphomas and leukaemias can be expected even with a VCM concentration of 1ppm. (66290)

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CIS 96-763 Benzene exposure assessment in rubber hydrochloride workers: A critical evaluation of previous estimates. Utterback D.F., Rinsky R.A., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.661-676. 35 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0763.pdf

Many risk assessments for leukaemia associated with benzene exposure have been based on a 1981 mortality study among a cohort of rubber hydrochloride workers. A re-examination of this study in 1992 resulted in retrospective benzene exposure estimates far greater than those previously reported; this suggests that calculated risk estimates for benzene were lower than previously estimated. The 1992 reanalysis is critically examined and it is concluded that the approach falls short of the claim of providing more plausible exposure estimates for the cohort. The original exposure estimates remain the most consistent with all the information available on rubber hydrochloride manufacturing. (66313)

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CIS 96-764 A transient model of mass transfer and kinetics in a passive vapor sampler. Williams C.E., Pintauro P.N., Rando R.J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1074-1082. Illus. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0764.pdf

A transient model of vapour contaminant diffusion and homogeneous reaction was formulated for a passive sampler containing two compartments: a stagnant air chamber and a chamber containing an absorbing medium. The model was evaluated using experimentally measured chlorine uptake rates in a series of samplers of different dimensions containing an aqueous sulfamic acid solution in the absorbing medium chamber. The model accurately predicted the effects of sampler diameter, stagnant air chamber path length, and sampler orientation on chlorine uptake, with an average error of less than 10%. Effects of wind speed and direction are discussed. (66322)

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CIS 96-765 Exposures while applying commercial disinfectants. Popendorf W., Selim M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1111-1120. Illus. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0765.pdf

Exposure to disinfectants was assessed for 40 workers using various methods of application in different occupational settings. Exposure estimates for each type of application are tabulated. The primary route of exposure was by skin deposition; airborne levels were low. Dermal dose rates for aerosol spray, wipe and mop applications were low compared with liquid pour and pump methods, but longer application times for wipe and mop methods resulted in higher total doses. High-pressure sprayers received the highest exposure outside their clothing, but heavy protective clothing reduced dermal dose rates. Low-pressure sprayers with no protective clothing had the highest dose rates. (66327)

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CIS 96-766 Asbestos - Recommendation No.347 of the National Health Insurance Fund concerning work on or repair of sprayed asbestos or on building components containing asbestos. (French: Amiante - Recommandations n°347 de la Caisse Nationale d'Assurance Maladie relatives aux travaux ou interventions sur flocage d'amiante ou matériaux contenant de l'amiante) Cahiers des Comités de prévention du bâtiment et des travaux publics, 1995, No.6, p.36-39. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0766.pdf

Principal features of these recommendations: scope; measures concerning demolition work; asbestos removal (choice of removal method, areal and individual methods of protection, work organization, decontamination of the work area); work on sprayed asbestos or asbestos-containing materials; commentary. A one-page document, aimed at owners and foremen, is appended on the evaluation of asbestos-related risks in a building and on how to eliminate these hazards. (66334)

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CIS 96-767 Is the European standard series suitable for patch testing in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia?. El-Rab M.O.G., Al-Sheikh O.A., Contact Dermatitis, Nov. 1995, Vol.33, No.5, p.310-314. Illus. 37 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0767.pdf

Patch testing was carried out on 240 dermatitis patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. 136 (57%) showed one or more positive results; positive reactions were found for 21 of the 22 items in the test series. Sensitization was most common to nickel sulfate, potassium dichromate, and cobalt chloride; less than 1% of patients reacted to benzocaine and none to primin. The European standard series is suitable for patch testing dermatitis patients in this region, with the exception of benzocaine and primin. The addition of three allergens that could be of local relevance is discussed. (66348)

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CIS 96-768 Permeability of commercial solvents through living human skin. Ursin C., Hansen C.M., Van Dyk J.W., Jensen P.O., Christensen I.J., Ebbehoej J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.651-660. Illus. 17 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0768.pdf

A procedure was developed for measuring the steady state rate of permeation of commercial solvents through living human skin. Variation in permeability for each skin specimen was measured using [3H]water as a calibrating permeant. Permeability was measured for 11 solvents: either highly polar solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide (known to be a rapid skin permeant), or commonly used industrial solvents such as toluene and ethanol. Data are tabulated for each solvent and for mixtures of dimethyl sulfoxide and octyl acetate. Results show a significant variation in magnitude. (66351)

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CIS 96-769 Maintenance of stellite and tungsten carbide saw saw tips: Determinants of exposure to cobalt and chromium. Teschke K., Marion S.A., van Zuylen M.J.A., Kennedy S.M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.661-669. Illus. 32 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0769.pdf

Personal air sampling among saw filers at eight lumber mills in British Columbia, Canada indicated very low exposures to cobalt and chromium. Cobalt exposure was related mainly to wet and dry grinding of tungsten carbide but not to grinding of stellite, despite the higher concentration of cobalt in the latter parent material. Chromium concentrations were associated with wet grinding of chipper knives made of chromium-containing steel, and with welding of stellite and saw steel. Airborne exposures may not be predicted by the amount of metal in the parent material and, in addition, standard hygiene measures like wet grinding may not reduce exposures. (66352)

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CIS 96-770 A field method for sampling benzene in end-exhaled air. Ljungkvist G.M., Nordlinder R.G., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.693-697. Illus. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0770.pdf

A simple and reliable field method is presented for sampling and analysis of benzene in end-exhaled air. The sample is collected directly on an adsorbent tube while the subject exhales through a sampling device consisting of a modified peak expiratory flow meter. The analytes are thermally desorbed and analyzed by gas chromatography. When the method was applied to the monitoring of benzene, the separation of benzene from other components of exhaled air was good and the detection limit was low (0.5µg/m3). The combined precision in sampling and analysis was excellent, with a coefficient of variation of 13%. (66356)

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CIS 96-771 Managing material safety data sheets world-wide. Ignatowski A.J., Weiler E.D., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.698-705. 36 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0771.pdf

The development of a centralized system for the world-wide management of material safety data sheets (MSDSs) within multinational enterprises is described. Problems related to differences in national MSDS requirements are discussed, including the definition of "hazardous chemical" and disclosure requirements for component chemicals in mixtures, treatment of trade secret information, and format and language requirements. The scheme is based on a concept of core and noncore data elements along with a centralized computer network. The system is operative in the USA, Canada, Latin America and Europe; MSDSs are provided in six languages and contain locally required data in the appropriate format for the country. (66357)

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CIS 96-772 Occupational and environmental exposure of automobile mechanics and nonautomotive workers to airborne manganese arising from the combustion of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT). Sierra P., Loranger S., Kennedy G., Zayed J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.713-716. Illus. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0772.pdf

Air sampling studies showed that the average workplace manganese concentration for a group of garage mechanics (0.45µgm-3) was 10 times higher than that of a nearby control group of nonautomotive workers (0.04µgm-3). Workplace concentrations of aluminium, iron and zinc were also higher for the mechanics. The nonautomotive workers had similar manganese concentrations at work and at home; both groups had significantly higher concentrations of the other three metals at the workplace than at home. Particle size investigation suggests that at least 90% of the manganese in garage air was from a source other than methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl. (66359)

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CIS 96-773 Dibromochloropropane (DBCP): A 17-year reassessment of testicular function and reproductive performance. Potashnik G., Porath A., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Nov. 1995, Vol.37, No.11, p.1287-1292. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0773.pdf

15 men with DBCP-induced testicular dysfunction, and whose last contact with DBCP (nemagon) was 17 to 22 years ago, were periodically evaluated since initial diagnosis in 1977. Sperm count recovery was evident within 36 to 45 months of the last exposure in 3 of the 9 azoospermic and in 3 of the 6 oligozoospermic men with no improvement thereafter. An increase in plasma follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and a decrease in testosterone level were detected in the severely affected individuals. There was no increase in the rate of spontaneous abortions and congenital malformations among pregnancies conceived during or after exposure. (66379)

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CIS 96-774 Monitoring of dinitrotoluene and its metabolites in urine by spectrophotometry of their coupled aryldiazonium salts. Smith E.F., Smith H.J., Kuchar E.J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1175-1179. Illus. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0774.pdf

A method for monitoring employee absorption of dinitrotoluene (DNT) is described. DNT and its metabolites in urine are reduced to primary arylamines and diazotized with nitrous acid. The diazo compounds are coupled with N-(1-Naphthyl)ethylenediamine to produce a coloured complex for spectrophotometric analysis. In a six-month monitoring programme at a DNT manufacturing facility, control samples from non-exposed individuals were used to define an exposure indication level. This level was used to correlate DNT exposure with job description or individual activity. Job descriptions were ranked according to a rational evaluation of exposure potential and correlated well with monitoring data. (66411)

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CIS 96-775 Autocorrelation of interday exposures at an automobile assembly plant. George D.K., Flynn M.R., Harris R.L., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1187-1194. Illus. 14 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0775.pdf

Serial 8-hr TWA exposures were obtained for six automobile assembly plant workers performing tasks involving the use of either isopropyl alcohol or hexane. Exposures were monitored for periods ranging from 20 to 110 consecutive days. Relatively little autocorrelation in the values was observed. The study highlights potential difficulties in autocorrelation analysis. In particular, nonrandom events, such as ventilation and process changes and extended down times, should be considered in any such analysis. Since exposure distributions vary over time, samples collected across the full range of procedures, activities and environmental conditions should be included when developing an exposure assessment strategy. (66413)

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CIS 96-776 Formaldehyde levels based on bulk and elevated temperature evolution rate measurements of silicone materials. Filsinger D.H., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1201-1207. Illus. 14 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0776.pdf

A method was devised to measure the evolution of formaldehyde from certain silicone materials at high temperatures. The method involves the use of a modified thermogravimetric analyzer in conjunction with a hydrazine-polarographic electrochemical test. The method is specific to formaldehyde and there is no interference from other aldehydes. Elevated temperature formaldehyde evolution rate data and their possible impact on the workplace exposure level are presented for several silicone materials. The data suggest that substances such as lubricating oils, gaskets, etc., generally considered to be innocuous, may also be sources of formaldehyde at high temperatures. (66415)

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CIS 96-777 The problem of variable ingredients and concentrations in solvent thinners. Winder C., Ng S.K., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1225-1228. 14 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0777.pdf

The contents of 20 proprietary thinner products used in automotive spray-painting establishments were identified using product material safety data sheets. Individual ingredients and their proportions were often not specifically described. The 20 products contained a total of 83 solvent ingredients consisting of 32 different solvents which came under 6 classes: alcohols, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, glycol ethers, ketones and mixtures. Users should be informed that some thinners still contain hazardous ingredients whose proportions can vary significantly. (66418)

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CIS 96-778 On strategies for comparing occupational exposure data to limits. Lyles R.H., Kupper L.L., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.6-15. Illus. 34 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0778.pdf

Methods for assessing workplace exposure are reviewed. Typical approaches are based on the probability that a single measurement exceeds a limit or on whether the long-term mean exposure for a population of workers exceeds a limit. A new procedure is developed for tests concerning the mean exposure level. Appropriate sample size calculations are emphasized and computer simulation is used to compare competing methods for assessing mean exposure. The importance of employing an exposure assessment strategy that is in accordance with aetiologic considerations is stressed. (66481)

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CIS 96-779 Variability in biological exposure indices using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation. Thomas R.S., Bigelow P.L., Keefe T.J., Yang R.S.H., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.23-32. 56 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0779.pdf

Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling coupled with Monte Carlo simulation, the interindividual variability in the concentrations of chemicals in a worker's exhaled breath and urine were estimated and compared with existing biological exposure indices. Based on model predictions incorporating interindividual variability, the percentage of population protected was derived using TLVs as the basis for worker protection. Results for six industrial solvents (benzene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, dichloromethane, methyl chloroform and trichloroethylene) showed that current biological exposure indices may not protect the majority or all of the workers in an occupational setting. (66483)

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CIS 96-780 Performance-based exposure control limits for pharmaceutical active ingredients. Naumann B.D., Sargent E.V., Starkman B.S., Fraser W.J., Becker G.T., Kirk G.D., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.33-42. Illus. 14 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0780.pdf

A performance-based approach for setting exposure limits for pharmaceutical products is described. The method involves assigning materials to one of five hazard categories according to their inherent toxicological and pharmacological properties. The criteria used to assign compounds into these control limit categories focus on the degree to which exposure impacts on human health. These assignments dictate the level of containment required to assure employee safety through the use of engineering controls and safe handling practices. Containment options for materials of low, moderate and high toxicity are summarized. (66484)

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CIS 96-781 Case study: Control of methylene chloride exposures during furniture stripping. Estill C.F., Spencer A.B., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.43-49. Illus. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0781.pdf

High exposures to dichloromethane (methylene chloride) (600 to 1150ppm) at a furniture stripping operation prompted the design and installation of a modified ventilation system. Three configurations within the modified system were evaluated. Personal exposures to methylene chloride were reduced to 34ppm for a slot hood configuration, 30ppm for a downdraft hood, and 28ppm for a combination slot and downdraft hood. Although exposures are above the proposed OSHA permissible exposure level of 25ppm, results show a substantial improvement over the original ventilation system. (66485)

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CIS 96-782 Volatile hydrocarbon exposure during in situ burning of crude oil at sea. Bowes S.M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.62-67. Illus. 14 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0782.pdf

Personal exposure of emergency response workers and other personnel to volatile hydrocarbons and benzene was monitored in a major oil spill combustion trial organized by Environment Canada. Although exposures were generally very low during the burning experiments, in situ burning of unweathered crude oil at an accidental oil spill would probably result in higher exposures if the oil had a higher benzene content than that used in the experiments, if it was less weathered or it had a larger evaporating surface area. The hazards of each oil spill scene need to be evaluated individually. (66488)

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CIS 96-783 Evaluation of personal continuous paper-tape monitors for toluenediisocyanate. Dharmarajan V., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.68-71. Illus. 8 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0783.pdf

The performance of nine personal continuous monitors (PCMs) was evaluated in dynamically generated toluenediisocyanate (TDI) atmospheres at two concentrations and at five relative humidities. The TDI concentrations were also measured using an OSHA reference method. Results are tabulated for each PCM. Compared with the reference method, the PCMs generally underestimated the higher TDI concentration at higher humidities; the lower TDI concentration was underestimated by a wider margin by the PCMs. There were significant inter-PCM differences when measuring simultaneously the same atmosphere with constant TDI concentration. (66489)

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CIS 96-784 Selenium levels in the serum of workers at a rubber tire repair shop. Sánchez-Ocampo A., Torres-Pérez J., Jiménez-Reyes M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.72-75. Illus. 21 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0784.pdf

Selenium analysis by neutron activation was performed on serum samples from 20 workers at a rubber tyre repair shop. The mean selenium level was significantly higher than that of a non-exposed control group. A high correlation was obtained between selenium level and seniority for those values higher than the control group range. None of the shop workers showed evidence of selenosis. (66490)

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CIS 96-785 Alert on benzene; The Benzene Agreement. (Portuguese: Alerta para o benzeno; Acordo Benzeno) Revista CIPA, Feb. 1996, Vol.17, No.195, p.38-56. Illus. 5 ref. (In Portuguese)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0785.pdf

The first article discusses the production and uses of benzene in Brazil, as well as its toxicology: paths of entry, absorption, poisoning symptoms, effects on the central nervous system, possible factor in the development of leukaemia, biological monitoring, effects on the environment). Other topics treated: spills; the ILO Benzene Convention and Recommendation (CIS 89-1766); the Brazilian legislative framework; statistical data on workers exposed to benzene in Brazil; utilization, storage and handling of benzene; first aid recommendations. The Benzene Agreement, signed recently by all the major employers' and workers' organizations concerned as well as by relevant government agencies, has the following roles: it assigns responsibilities regarding the prevention of risks due to exposure to benzene; it establishes a National Permanent Commission for Benzene (CNP-Benzeno) for the purpose of discussion, negotiation and implementation of this Agreement; it outlines the involvement of workers in prevention efforts; it provides deadlines for enterprises to comply with the Technical Reference Value (TRV) of 1.0ppm; the Certificate of Controlled Benzene Use; penalties. (66492)

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CIS 96-786 Balancing cost and precision in exposure assessment studies. Lemasters G.K., Shukla R., Li Y.D., Lockey J.E., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.38, No.1, p.39-45. 13 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0786.pdf

An approach to balancing two objectives in exposure assessment studies is described: increasing precision and decreasing the cost by manipulating the number and pattern of sample collections. The strategy involves: design of a small pilot study to obtain an optimum sampling scheme for exposure assessment; use of a nested random effects model to obtain variance components for each subject; estimation of the population variance components; calculation of standard errors and expenses of all possible alternative designs; and comparison of sampling cost and relative accuracy of each design. Data is provided from a study examining health effects of workers exposed to solvents. (66613)

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CIS 96-787 Unit risk estimates for airborne arsenic exposure: An updated view based on recent data from two copper smelter cohorts. Viren J.R., Silvers A., Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, Oct. 1994, Vol.20, No.2, p.125-138. Illus. 20 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0787.pdf

The current unit risk for chronic lifetime exposure to airborne arsenic 4.29 x 10-3, was established by the US EPA in 1984. Using updated results from a cohort mortality study on Tacoma, Washington, smelter workers and recent findings from a cohort study of 3619 Swedish smelter workers, new unit risk estimates were developed for the respective cohorts. Methods were analogous to those used by the EPA in 1984, and all estimates were derived under an absolute risk model. A new unit risk 1.28 x 10-3, was estimated for the Tacoma smelter cohort which was a factor of five less than the EPA's earlier estimate, and a direct result of radically revised exposure estimates. A unit risk of 0.89 x 10-3 was estimated from the Swedish study. Pooling these new risk estimates with the EPA's earlier estimates yielded a composite unit risk of 1.43 x 10-3. Based on this estimate, the present unit risk may overestimate the effects of airborne arsenic by a factor of 3. (66637)

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CIS 96-788 Measurement of perchloroethylene indoor air levels caused by fugitive emissions from unvented dry-to-dry dry cleaning units. Moschandreas D.J., O'Dea D.S., Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, Feb. 1995, Vol.45, p.111-115. Illus. 11 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0788.pdf

The large emissions of perchloroethylene (PERC), a potential carcinogen, from dry cleaning establishments led the fabricare industry to redesign dry cleaning machines. State-of-the-art facilities now employ nonvented self-contained machines that do not emit vapours directly to the outside air. However, fugitive emissions in indoor environments continue to be emitted from these new machines. An indoor air quality study was conducted in six Chicago, Illinois, dry cleaning establishments that use nonvented self-contained machines. PERC concentrations were investigated by collecting 46 air samples with 150mg charcoal tubes and subsequently conducting gas chromatograph analysis. Indoor PERC concentrations ranged from 1.7 to 52.3ppm. A relationship was developed between the weight of clothes cleaned and the emission rate of each facility. This relationship may be used to estimate PERC indoor air concentrations in other facilities. (66641)

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CIS 96-789 Acute exposure to acetone in a factory and ratings of well-being. Kiesswetter E., Blaszkewicz M., Vangala R.R., Seeber A., Neurotoxicology, Fall 1994, Vol.15, No.3, p.597-601. Illus. 11 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0789.pdf

Eight workers occupationally exposed to acetone and eight nonexposed controls were investigated on 9 shift days both during work and leisure. The mean exposure to acetone was near 1000ppm (2400mg/m3). Acetone in urine was moderately correlated to acetone in the air. Ratings on scales of well-being and acute symptoms (SPES) correlated significantly with concentrations of acetone in urine but not with concentrations of acetone in the air. (66643)

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CIS 96-790 Evaluation of the adequacy of the threshold limit value for cyclonite. James R.C., Roberts S.M., Williams P.L., Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, July 1994, Vol.9, No.7, p.485-492. 32 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0790.pdf

The current American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists 8-h, time-weighted average threshold limit value (TLV) for cyclonite (RDX) is 1.5mg/m3. The present study has reviewed the human and animal toxicity literature available for RDX for the purpose of assessing the current RDX standard. Although the only available health study of occupational exposure to RDX finds no evidence of chronic toxicity in areas where the current TLV level was achieved, the evidence for the reported effectiveness of this TLV is of a very limited nature. The animal data are more extensive, and several chronic studies have been completed. When no observed adverse effect levels identified from the chronic animal studies are used to derive a TLV for RDX, and these derivations adopt relatively standard safety factors for this type of animal-to-human dosage extrapolation, the calculations suggest permissible air exposure levels for RDX between 0.03 and 0.3mg/m3. (66648)

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CIS 96-791 Health hazards of antiviral agents. (French: Les risques pour la santé lors de la manipulation des antiviraux) Carruel F., Falcy M., Ministère du Travail (France), Documents pour le médecin du travail, 2nd Quarter 1995, No.62, p.95-102. 30 ref. (In French)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0791.pdf

The number of antiviral drugs has greatly increased in recent years. Before the middle 1980s, amantadine was the only such product on the market. Since then a number of new antiviral agents have appeared as a result of research into new therapeutic molecules as a response to the AIDS epidemic. Main points covered by this article: known toxic effects, with information for each substance on mutagenicity, reproductive effects and recommendations for safe handling. The following products are discussed: acyclovir (ACV), ganciclovir, zidovudine (AZT), 2,3-dideoxycytidine (DDC, HIVID), dideoxyinosine (DDI, didanosine), pyrophosphate derivatives, interferons and antisense oligonucleotides. (66695)

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CIS 96-792 Glycol ethers. Job-exposure matrix. (French: Ethers de glycol - Matrice emplois-expositions) Vincent R., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 1st Quarter 1996, No.162, Note No.2009-162-96, p.5-17. 18 ref. (In French)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0792.pdf

A campaign to assess exposure to glycol ethers was conducted by INRS from 1988 to 1993 in 55 firms, covering 63 workshops or work situations. Exposure was measured by atmospheric and biological sampling. A total of 944 employees took part in the survey; 1,746 atmospheric samples and 2,315 urine samples were taken. Based on the results, a job-exposure matrix for glycol ethers was drawn up. For each occupational activity the likelihood, intensity and frequency of exposure were codified. (66701)

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CIS 96-793 Approved laboratories and organizations for the assessment of benzene exposure. Results of the approval tests carried out by INRS from 1987 to 1994. (French: Laboratoires et organismes agréés pour l'évaluation de l'exposition au benzène - Bilan et résultats des essais organisés de 1987 à 1994 pour l'obtention de l'agrément) Jargot D., Oury B., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 1st Quarter 1996, No.162, Note No.2012-162-96, p.41-46. Illus. (In French)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0793.pdf

Contents include: description of testing programmes; reference values; classification of laboratories; procedure for Ministry of Labour approval. Results for the period 1987-1994: assessment of participation, test results. (66704)

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CIS 96-794 Mineral oils and the DMSO-UV method: Various applications. (French: Huiles minérales et méthodes DMSO-UV - Applications diverses) Lafontaine M., Morele Y., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 1st Quarter 1996, No.162, Note No.2013-162-96, p.47-53. Illus. 12 ref. (In French)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0794.pdf

The purpose of this paper is to define the field of application of the DMSO-UV method used to assess the potential dermal carcinogenicity of mineral oils, after consideration of the following points: influence of main additives on the UV absorbance index of DMSO extract; relevance of the recommendations of French organizations in charge of occupational risk prevention (CNAM recommendations), with the recommendations of the petroleum industry, based on the IP 346 method; relationship between the UV absorbance index and benzo(a)pyrene concentration; different types of oils and their uses. (66705)

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CIS 96-795 Development of a questionnaire in Spanish on neurotoxic symptoms. Rodezno R.A., Lundberg I., Escalona E., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.505-520. 29 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0795.pdf

A questionnaire in Spanish was developed to study the effects of neurotoxic agents in groups of workers in Nicaragua. The initial 34 questions were reduced to 16 after studying whether the questions were interpreted in the intended way, whether the answers were reasonably reproduced over a three-week period, and whether the questions discriminated between groups exposed to different neurotoxic agents (mercury, lead, organic solvents and organophosphate insecticides) and unexposed groups. In total, 851 workers participated in the evaluation. Further evaluation of the questionnaire is welcomed. (66735)

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CIS 96-796 Chromatographic characterization of adsorbents for selective sampling of organic air pollutants. Stanetzek I., Giese U., Schuster R.H., Wünsch G., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.128-133. 25 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0796.pdf

Seven adsorption materials were investigated by inverse gas chromatography for 25 different organic compounds. Specific retention volume and adsorption enthalpy were calculated. According to retention ability, the materials were characterized as follows: Amberlite XAD-4 (styrene-divinyl-benzene-copolymer) and Porapak R (N-vinyl pyrrolidine-polymer) were useful for sampling polar and nonpolar low-volatility compounds; Amberlite XAD-8 (methacrylic acid polymer) retained only polar high-melting substances. Quantitative sampling of high-melting nonpolar pollutant was possible with Tenax GC (2,6-diphenyl-p-phenylenoxide-polymer). The retention ability of these polymers for volatile compounds was very small; highly volatile polar compounds can be adsorbed on silica gel and highly volatile nonpolar compounds on activated charcoal. (66772)

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CIS 96-797 Comparison between solid sampler and impinger for evaluation of occupational exposure to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate polyisocyanates during spray painting. Maître A., Leplay A., Perdrix A., Ohl G., Boinay P., Romazini S., Aubrun J.C., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.153-160. 36 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0797.pdf

Two air sampling methods were used to monitor the level and variability of a painter's exposure to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) polyisocyanates while spraying Tolonate-based paints in a paint booth. Personal air samples were collected by midget impingers containing 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (MPP) absorber solution and by MPP-impregnated filters. Potential exposure to HDI polyisocyanates measured by impinger devices ranged from 0.25 to 3mg/m3. Impregnated filters significantly underestimated atmospheric concentrations of HDI polyisocyanates in the painter's breathing zone. Use of an appropriate half-face mask with 90% efficiency is recommended to reduce residual exposure to below the recommended STEL (1mg/m3). (66775)

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CIS 96-798 Neurotoxic effects of selected metals. Wennberg A., Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 1994, Vol.20, Special issue, p.65-71. Illus. 70 ref. (In English)

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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0798.pdf

A substance is considered to be neurotoxic if it is capable of inducing a consistent pattern of neural dysfunction or lesion in the nervous system. Several metals are known as neurotoxic. Among them, four were selected as being especially important from the occupational point of view: lead, manganese, aluminium and mercury. All four have proved to be neurotoxic even though the toxic mechanisms may be unclear or unknown. This paper reviews the recently published documentation on the neurotoxic properties of these metals, from the general as well as the occupational point of view. (66817)

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CIS 96-799 Longitudinal study of workers exposed to mercury vapour at low concentrations - Time course of inorganic and organic mercury concentrations in urine, blood, and hair. Ishihara N., Urushiyama K., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oct. 1994, Vol.51, No.10, p.660-662. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0799.pdf

Seven Japanese female workers exposed to mercury vapour at a concentration of <0.02mg Hg/m3 (8h/day, 44h/week) were examined for inorganic (I-Hg) and organic (O-Hg) mercury concentrations in urine, blood, and hair after 0, 4, 8, 17, and 23 months of exposure. Neither I-Hg nor O-Hg concentrations in urine and hair increased significantly, even after 23 months of exposure. However, the concentration of I-Hg and O-Hg in plasma and O-Hg in erythrocytes increased significantly after four months of exposure, and the high concentrations were maintained until the end of the study. Absence of a significant increase in the concentration of O-Hg in hair indicates that changes in concentrations of I-Hg and O-Hg in blood could be caused by the occupational exposure to mercury vapour. These results show clearly that mercury concentration in blood indicates the uptake of mercury compared with data from before employment with mercury contrary to urinary mercury concentration which remained unaffected, even after a 23-month exposure. (66827)

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CIS 96-800 Upper airway irritation and small airways hyperreactivity due to exposure to potassium aluminium tetrafluoride flux - An extended case report. Hjortsberg U., Ørbaek P., Arborelius M.J., Karlsson J.E., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oct. 1994, Vol.51, No.10, p.706-709. 15 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0800.pdf

Twenty-two workers, exposed to potassium aluminium tetrafluoride used as flux for soldering aluminium, were studied as clinical outpatients for symptoms of irritation of the nose, eye, skin and airways. Sixteen volunteered for spirometry with methacholine provocation test including a test for small airways function by volume of trapped gas (VTG). Symptoms of airways irritation diminished in all subjects after flux exposure ended. The FEV1 was within the normal range in 16 of 17 subjects before the methacholine provocation test. The FEV1 decreased by ≥20% in two out of 16 subjects after the 0.1% methacholine provocation and after inhalation of methacholine, eight out of 16 subjects (50%) had an abnormal increase of VTG indicating hyperreactivity in small airways. Potassium aluminium tetrafluoride flux seems to induce an increase of bronchial reactivity in small airways. A setting of an occupational standard is proposed. (66830)

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CIS 96-801 Prevalence of respiratory risk among workers exposed to enzyme-free detergents. (French: Prévalence du risque professionnel respiratoire chez les ouvriers exposés aux détergents sans enzyme) Laraqui C., Belamallem I., Harourate K., El Meziane A., Moutammil Z., Benhaymoud N., Verger C., Curtès J.P., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.19-25. 17 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0801.pdf

There is little information on respiratory hazards in the enzyme-free detergent manufacturing industry. This study (98 exposed for at least 2 years vs 54 controls) evaluates the prevalence of respiratory complaints in this industry. A standardized questionnaire, a clinical examination and a lung function test at the beginning and end of the working day showed that the physical characteristics of the 2 groups are comparable and the prevalence of coughing (35.9%), chronic bronchitis (22.4%), asthma (16.6%), dermatitis (32%), rhinitis (27.2%) and conjunctivitis (21%) was significantly higher among exposed workers. Respiratory function tests showed lower values for certain parameters among exposed subjects. FEV1 and VC were significantly lower among 32.9% and 20.4%, respectively, of the exposed versus 11.1% and 7.4% of the non-exposed. The variation in respiratory function during work showed a reduction in FEV1 among the exposed workers. Smoking is associated with increased morbidity. It is recommended that exposure limits (TWA, STEL) be introduced for enzyme-free detergents. (66832)

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CIS 96-802 Perturbations of the sense of smell caused by chemicals at work. (German: Störungen des Riechvermögens durch und für Arbeitsstoffe) Muttray A., Konietzko J., Arbeitsmedizin - Sozialmedizin - Umweltmedizin, Oct. 1994, Vol.29, No.10, p.409-413. 43 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0802.pdf

The work and exposure histories and results of the medical examinations of three victims of anosmia (loss of smell) are described. The chemicals involved in causing the loss of smell were acetone, cyclohexanone, dichloromethane and tetrahydrofuran in the case of a plumber whose work involved installing and repairing plastic pipes in water treatment plants. Mixtures of organic solvents and non-occupational factors led to loss of smell in the case of a painter. Chromates or solvents were involved in the case of a worker in the chromium plating department of a shock-absorber manufacturing plant. (66856)

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CIS 96-803 Biennial stoppage at a chemical plant - Assessment of exposure of outside contractor employees to chemical substances. (French: Arrêt biennal d'un site de l'industrie chimique - Exposition aux produits chimiques des salariés d'entreprises extérieures) Héry M., Diebold F., Hecht G., Gerber J.M., Hubert G., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1995, No.161, Note No.2004-161-95, p.477-487. Illus. 15 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0803.pdf

During the biennial stoppage of a major chemical plant producing isocyanates, chlorine, soda and other substances, a study was carried out on the exposure of employees of outside contractors to various chemicals. The highest exposures were recorded for employees of mechanical engineering firms responsible for assembling and dismantling the reactors, and employees of industrial cleaning contractors working on a toluene diisocyanate (TDI) production unit. Numerous other pollutants were measured: crystalline silica, metals (welding fumes), organic solvents (nitrotoluenes, chlorobenzenes), acids, alkalis, mineral fibres. Examples of coactivity were also detected, but in small numbers and at generally low levels. (66863)

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CIS 96-804 Determination of the emission rate of a gas source - Development of a helium tracer method. (French: Traçage à l'hélium - Mise au point d'une méthode de mesure du débit d'émission d'une source gazeuse) Bémer D., Dessagne J.M., Aubertin G., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1995, No.161, Note No.2007-161-95, p.509-518. Illus. 11 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0804.pdf

The tracer gas method for determining the emission rate of a pollutant gas source consists of using a tracer gas along with the pollutant emitted by a constant flow source in order to establish the mass flow rate. The study demonstrates the validity of the tracer gas method for determining the emission rate of a pollutant source comprising a solvent bath placed in the open air. Limitations were noted, however, when the source was placed in very still air (air velocity above the bath <10cm/s approx.). But this situation is by no means the most common in industry, where average air velocity is generally of the order of 30cm/s or more. It is planned to extend this method to particulate pollutant sources, which are very frequent in industry (wood dusts, oil mists, welding fumes, etc.). (66866)

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CIS 96-805 Assessment of benzene exposure among automobile and gardening machine repair workers by the measurement of urinary muconic acid. (French: Evaluation par le dosage de l'acide muconique urinaire de l'imprégnation par le benzène, chez les mécaniciens en réparation automobile et motoculture) Vallée P., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.8, p.620-623. 8 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0805.pdf

Evaluation of exposure to benzene among car mechanics requires a reliable analytical method in order to define specific criteria for medical supervision. Previous studies took only atmospheric exposure into account. Exposure was evaluated by measuring urinary phenol, a method that was not sensitive enough when atmospheric concentrations were at the ppm level. The measurement of urinary muconic acid, a specific metabolite of benzene, by HPLC chromatography is sensitive enough to reveal low levels of exposure. A study conducted of the exposure of employees over a one-week period showed that there was no overexposure. Only the seasonal activities of servicing and repairing garden machinery would lead to a global exposure greater than 1ppm. (66872)

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CIS 96-806 Evaluation of an exposure setup for studying effects of diesel exhaust in humans. Rudell B., Sandström T., Hammarström U., Ledin M.L., Hörstedt P., Stjernberg N., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1994, Vol.66, No.2, p.77-83. Illus. 17 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0806.pdf

Diesel exhaust fumes from an idling truck were fed into an exposure chamber through a flexible metallic tube where they were diluted with air. Evaluation of the exposure set-up revealed that predetermined constant pollutant concentrations can be created in the chamber. The exposure of eight healthy non-smokers to diluted exhaust fumes for one hour produced the same acute symptoms as those reported by workers occupationally exposed to exhaust fumes from idling diesel vehicles. All subjects experienced irritation of the mucous tissue of the eyes, nose and throat, dizziness, nausea, cough, unpleasant odour, fatigue and headache. The median concentrations of the major components of diesel exhaust were: nitrogen dioxide 1.6ppm, nitrogen oxide 3.7ppm, carbon monoxide 27ppm, formaldehyde 0.5mg/m3 and particles 4.3 x 106/cm3. (66887)

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CIS 96-807 Respiratory and other hazards of isocyanates. Baur X., Marek W., Ammon J., Czuppon A.B., Marczynski B., Raulf-Heimsoth M., Roemmelt H., Fruhmann G., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1994, Vol.66, No.3, p.141-152. Illus. 131 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0807.pdf

Isocyanates have various applications including those in the production of plastics, polyurethane foams and insecticides. Recent results of experimental, immunological and clinical studies of the respiratory diseases caused by isocyanates are summarized. Special consideration is given to findings among 1,780 workers exposed to isocyanates. The case histories and clinical data of 625 of these workers who were exposed during the production of polyurethanes revealed that 247 had respiratory symptoms. The majority of these were diagnosed as suffering from bronchial asthma. Chronic bronchitis, rhinitis, conjunctivitis and allergic alveolitis followed. The risk of developing chronic airway disorders such as bronchial asthma was found to depend on the concentration of isocyanates. Immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization and irritative effects were identified as the main pathophysiological mechanisms. (66888)

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CIS 96-808 Risks connected to mineral oil exposure in working environments. (Italian: Rischi connessi all'esposizione ad oli minerali negli ambienti di lavoro) Rimatori V., Salerno A., Di Pietro M., Benvenuti F., Prevenzione oggi, Jan.-Mar. 1994, Vol.6, No.1, p. 3-10. Illus. 15 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0808.pdf

Procedures to sample and analyze mineral oils in working environments and to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are described. The results, obtained in the Italian textile, mechanical and printing industries, show that the levels allowed by ACGIH can be controlled by the described methods. The TLV-TWA (5mg/m3) assigned by ACGIH in 1991-92 was not reached in the monitored environment. (66911)

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CIS 96-809 Risk control in activities linked to battery charging. (Italian: Il controllo dei rischi nell'attività di carica batterie) Baracco A., D'Allio G., Mercurio G., Leante E., Berra A., Prevenzione oggi, July-Sep. 1992, Vol.4, No.3, p.13-24. Illus. 10 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0809.pdf

Occupational exposure of 158 male workers assigned to the charging of lead batteries was monitored and their health was compared with 295 controls (285 men + 10 women), in order to evaluate the risks connected with lead as required by Italian Decree No.277/91 (CIS 93-1404). No environmental lead pollution was observed, these activities being performed in conformity with CEI (Comitato Elettrotecnico Italiano) Regulations 21-4 and 64-2. Since blood lead levels in the exposed workers was below the OSHA (U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration) standard, it was suggested to re-evaluate the hazard values of various activities listed in the Italian Decree and to delete the "battery handling" work category as a hazardous occupational activity. (66917)

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CIS 96-810 Biological indices of exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons. (Italian: Indici biologici di esposizione ad idrocarburi aromatici) Colombi A., Buratti M., Benvenuti F,, Spagnoli G., Salerno A., Prevenzione oggi, Oct.-Dec. 1994, Vol.6, No.4, p.3-67. Illus. 165 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0810.pdf

Biological exposure indices of the most widespread organic solvents, namely, toluene, xylene, styrene, benzene and ethylbenzene are provided. For each of these hydrocarbons, professional exposure sources, absorption pathways, metabolism and excretion are shown, besides the most common dose and effect indexes adopted in biological monitoring. Possible criteria of choice of listed indices together with their limitations of use are also presented. For each solvent, chemical/physical characteristics and analytical methods for their determination in biological fluids are fully described and reported. (66925)

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CIS 96-811 The highest permissible values for chemical pollutants in the work environment. (Italian: I valori limite degli inquinanti chimici negli ambienti di lavoro) Benvenuti F., Giambattistelli S., Scarselli R., Palmi S., Prevenzione oggi, Oct.-Dec. 1994, Vol.6, No.4, p.69-84. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0811.pdf

This survey reviews the history of various Italian legislative proposals to define the highest acceptable levels for concentrations of chemical substances used in industrial production processes. In recent years the Italian Superior Institute for Prevention and Work Safety (ISPESL), in collaboration with various Italian universities, planned a series of research projects resulting in the definition of the highest acceptable levels for about 70 substances. A comparison with ACGIH values has shown either an overlapping or even a lower level of values proposed in Italy. A new described ISPESL initiative aims at continuing this research with university institutes, coordinating it with programmes of the European Community. (66926)

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CIS 96-812 An evaluation of toxic and genotoxic risk from work-related exposure to chemical compounds. (Italian: Valutazione del rischio tossico e genotossico da eposizione professionale a composti chimici) Scassellati Sforzolini G., Moretti M., Villarini M., Angeli G., Pasquini R., Monarca S., Scarselli R., Crea M.G., Leonardis C., Prevenzione oggi, Oct.-Dec. 1994, Vol.6, N°4, p.125-138. Illus. 45 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0812.pdf

A series of investigations was conducted to test the genotoxic and enzyme-inducing activity of deltamethrin (decamethrin), in order to contribute to its risk assessment in occupational exposure to pesticides. Using in-vitro methods, its mutagenic activity was tested on procaryotic cells (Ames test) and eucaryotic cells (cytogenetic tests, DNA damage). With in-vivo experiments on rats, various enzyme activities were determined to investigate the capability of deltamethrin to act as "co-mutating/co-cancerogenous" agent and/or "promoter" of carcinogenic processes. The results allow to state that pure deltamethrin, while negative in the Ames test, is capable of damaging the DNA and increasing the frequency of micronuclei in human lymphocytes, requiring therefore the monitoring of such an indicator in the exposed workers. Both the pure and commercial product are able to alter cell metabolism in various ways, with a potential "indirect" genotoxic risk. (66927)

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CIS 96-813 Short and long-term respiratory effects of exposure to low concentrations of diphenylmethane diisocyanate in the production of expanded polyurethane. (Italian: Effetti respiratori, a breve e lungo termine, della esposizione a basse concentrazioni di MDI, difenilmetan diisocianato, nella produzione di manufatti in poliuretano espanso) Sulotto F., Romano C., Chiesa A., Piolatto G., Coggiola M., Botta G., Serra A., Scarselli R., Palmi S., Scansetti G., Prevenzione oggi, Oct.-Dec. 1994, Vol.6, No.4, p.163-175. 17 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0813.pdf

Spirometric parameters (FVC, FEV1 and FEF25-75) readings were assessed in a group of 27 foam skimmers with a low environmental exposure level to diphenylmethane diisocyanate (DMD) at the beginning and at the end of their work shifts. A control group consisted of workers not exposed to DMD of similar age. The observed decrease in the parameters at the end of the shift overlapped in the two groups, but a greater weekly decrease in FEF25-75 was observed in the skimmer group. In 11 of the 27 skimmers, for whom previous spirometric data were available, a higher decrease was observed for FVC. Smoking in either group did not have a clear influence on the results. (66929)

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CIS 96-814 Safe handling of asbestos. (French: Dossier: La prévention face à l'amiante) Gout D., Laforest J.C., Brochard P., Le Bacle C., Huré P., Travail et sécurité, Dec. 1995, No.543, p.640-672. Illus. Bibl.ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0814.pdf

This round-up is intended for anyone involved with asbestos. It includes a review of asbestos-related disease, an interview with a specialist from the French Research and Safety Institute (INRS) on three kinds of hazard due to asbestos, an article on the INRS asbestos laboratory, advice to occupational physicians together with a list of the principal operations that can liberate asbestos, the recommendation of the French National Health Insurance Fund concerning removal of sprayed asbestos, a bibliography of relevant INRS publications and a summary of the most important legal texts regarding asbestos. (66951)

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CIS 96-815 Combined effects of binary solvent mixtures. Frantík E., Vodičková L., Central European Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1995, Vol.1, No.1, p.31-37. 13 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0815.pdf

Experimental rats were exposed to vapours of the following solvent mixtures and to the individual solvents: trichloroethylene and styrene; toluene and ethyl acetate or 1-butanol; and m-xylene and ethylbenzene. Neurotropic effects and blood and brain levels of solvents were measured. In no case was a more than additive effect or an atypical interaction of solvents reproduced. Strong or atypical interactions previously reported for these types of mixtures, which would invalidate the summation formula for the assessment of hazard, appear not to be specific for these particular combinations. (66972)

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CIS 96-816 Biological monitoring in lead exposure. Timár M., Groszmann M., Hudák A., Náray M., Szépvölgyi E., Central European Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1995, Vol.1, No.1, p.53-62. 31 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0816.pdf

Blood lead levels (PbB) and erythrocyte zinc-protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentrations were measured in populations living in residential areas and/or working in factories differently polluted by lead. Reference values for rural and urban populations were established. Based on the relationship between PbB and ZPP, different ZPP values may be used for pre-screening of workers (i.e. selection of those workers in whom PbB determination is necessary), depending on the PbB value chosen as a limit or action level. A system for periodical health surveillance of lead exposed workers is outlined. (66973)

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CIS 96-817 Contact allergy to colophony and hand eczema: A follow-up study of patients with previously diagnosed contact allergy to colophony. Färm G., Contact Dermatitis, Feb. 1996, Vol.34, No.2, p.93-100. 30 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0817.pdf

A follow-up study of 83 individuals in whom contact allergy to colophony had been diagnosed 9-13 years earlier showed that at least 30% had current hand eczema. 72% still showed positive results on patch-testing with colophony, and more than 50% had additional positive reactions to other allergens. 12 subjects reported occupational exposure to wood, paint, lacquers, soaps or soldering flux; 24 reported intense exposure to paper. Factors influencing the prognosis of hand eczema in individuals with contact allergy to colophony include intervention, onset location of dermatitis, patch test results, sex, occupational exposure to colophony and atopy. (66978)

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CIS 96-818 ELPAT Program Report: Background and current status (July 1995). Schlecht P.C., Groff J.H., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Oct. 1995, Vol.56, No.10, p.1034-1040. 22 ref. ### (In English)

Progress report on the US Environmental Lead Proficiency Analytical Testing (ELPAT) Program, administered by the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) in cooperation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), NIOSH and the EPA. (67015)

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CIS 96-819 Characterization of gas mixing in an exhaust stack. Wood G.O., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Aug. 1995, Vol.56, No.8, p.788-793. Illus. 4 ref. ### (In English)

(67018)

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CIS 96-820 Evaluation of optical source-detector configurations for tomographic reconstruction of chemical concentrations in indoor air. Todd L., Ramachandran G., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1994, Vol.55, No.12, p.1133-1143. Illus. 11 ref. ### (In English)

(67031)

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CIS 96-821 Acute exposure to acid fog: Influence of breathing pattern on effective dose. Bowes S.M., Francis M., Laube B.L., Robert F., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1995, Vol.56, No.2, p.143-150. Illus. 42 ref. ### (In English)

(67035)

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CIS 96-822 Desorption isotherms of volatile organic compounds adsorbed on activated charcoal. Pérez Ballesta P., González Ferradás E., Miñana Aznar A., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1995, Vol.56, No.2, p.171-177. Illus. 20 ref. ### (In English)

(67036)

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CIS 96-823 Sample size formulae for estimating the true arithmetic or geometric mean of lognormal exposure distributions. Hewett P., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Mar. 1995, Vol.56, No.3, p.219-225. 18 ref. ### (In English)

(67038)

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CIS 96-824 A solid sorbent personal air sampling method for aldehydes. Wu L.J., Que Hee S.S., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Apr. 1995, Vol.56, No.4, p.362-367. 26 ref. ### (In English)

(67048)

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CIS 96-825 Blood lead surveys of communities in proximity to lead-containing mill tailings. Danse I.H.R., Garb L.G., Moore R.H., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Apr. 1995, Vol.56, No.4, p.384-393. 124 ref. ### (In English)

Literature survey. (67049)

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CIS 96-826 Substitution of dangerous chemicals - The solution to problems with chemical health hazards in the work environment?. Antonsson A.B., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Apr. 1995, Vol.56, No.4, p.394-397. Illus. 8 ref. ### (In English)

(67050)

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CIS 96-827 Irritant dermatitis among workers cleaning up a pesticide spill - California 1991. Koo D., Goldman L., Baron R., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1995, Vol.27, No.4, p.545-553. Illus. 17 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0827.pdf

Among a group of 42 county jail inmates who removed dead fish from a river following a spill of metam sodium, 27 had dermatitis involving the feet and ankles. Dermatitis was associated with lower extremity water contact; attack rate increased with time spent in the water. Workers who changed to dry clothing after the clean-up did not report dermatitis. The river concentration of methylisothiocyanate (the decomposition product of metam sodium and a known skin irritant) measured 20-40ppb at the time of exposure. It is suggested that prolonged wetness, occlusive boots, friction and heat contributed to the irritation at this low concentration. (66288)

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CIS 96-828 Reduced fertility among women exposed to organic solvents. Sallmén M., Lindbohm M.L., Kyyrönen P., Nykyri E., Anttila A., Taskinen H., Hemminki K., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.699-713. 39 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0828.pdf

A questionnaire survey was carried out among 197 women biologically monitored for exposure to organic solvents between 1965 and 1983. Time to pregnancy was used a measure of fertility. The women were classified into exposure categories on the basis of work descriptions and the use of solvents and on biological monitoring measurements. Daily or high solvent exposure was significantly associated with reduced fertility. Risks were observed among shoe factory, dry cleaning and metal workers. Women exposed to tetrachloroethylene or highly exposed to aliphatic hydrocarbons seemed to have prolonged times to pregnancies. (66315)

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CIS 96-829 Occupational allergic contact dermatitis and contact urticaria caused by polyfunctional aziridine hardener. Kanerva L., Estlander T., Jolanki R., Tarvainen K., Contact Dermatitis, Nov. 1995, Vol.33, No.5, p.304-309. Illus. 22 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0829.pdf

Two case studies of allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to a polyfunctional aziridine (PFA) hardener are described. Positive allergic patch test reactions to the PFA hardener and negative reactions with other chemicals in the product (acrylates, propyleneimine and dimethylethanolamine) indicated that PFA caused the allergic contact dermatitis. Skin prick tests on one of the subjects indicated contact urticaria. For patch testing, 0.5% PFA hardener in pet. is recommended; skin prick tests may be of help in detecting contact urticaria. (66347)

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CIS 96-830 Warts in aquarium industry workers. Tong D., Contact Dermatitis, Nov. 1995, Vol.33, No.5, p.348-349. Illus. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0830.pdf

Case studies of two marine aquarium shop workers with common warts on the hands are described. Both workers handled aquarium gravel and sharp-edged coral skeletons, and the hands were frequently wet with cuts and abrasions. Possible causes of the warts in these workers and workers in other industries are discussed. (66350)

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CIS 96-831 Lead-induced nephropathy: Relationship between various biological exposure indices and early markers of nephrotoxicity. Chia K.S., Jeyaratnam J., Lee J., Tan C., Ong H.Y., Lee E., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.883-895. 37 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0831.pdf

Current blood lead levels were determined in 128 lead-exposed workers and in 93 non-exposed controls. For the exposed workers, time-integrated blood indices were derived from serial blood lead measurements taken during the years of exposure. Urinary α1-microglobulin, urinary β2-microglobulin and urinary retinol-binding protein were also measured as markers of lead-induced kidney damage. In the exposed workers, all the effect markers had better correlation with the time-integrated blood lead indices than with current blood lead levels; urinary α1-microglobulin was the only marker that was significantly higher in the exposed group, with a good dose-response and dose-effect relationship with the time-integrated blood lead indices. (66439)

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CIS 96-832 Bronchiolitis obliterans in an animal feed worker. Spain B.A., Cummings O., Garcia J.G.N., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.437-443. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0832.pdf

A case study is presented of a nonsmoking animal feed production worker who developed severe irreversible airflow obstruction during a 2-year occupational exposure to organic matter, microorganisms, proteolytic enzymes and both amorphous and synthetic silicates. Open lung biopsy demonstrated findings consistent with bronchiolitis obliterans; silicate particles in biopsy specimens suggested a potential link between silicate exposure and pathologic findings. Findings should be considered when evaluating symptomatic patients with occupational exposure to animal feed dusts, in particular amorphous and synthetic silicates. (66442)

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CIS 96-833 Wood dust and sino-nasal cancer: Pooled reanalysis of twelve case-control studies. Demers P.A., Kogevinas M., Boffetta P., Leclerc A., Luce D., Gérin M., Battista G., Belli S., Bolm-Audorf U., Brinton L.A., Colin D., Comba P., Hardell L., Hayes R.B., Magnani C., Merler E., Morcet J.F., Preston-Martin S., Matos E., Rodella S., Vaughan T.L., Zheng W., Vainio H., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.151-166. 36 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0833.pdf

Data from 12 case-control studies conducted in seven countries were pooled and reanalyzed. A high risk of adenocarcinoma among men was associated with employment in wood-related occupations; there was also some evidence of an increased risk among women in these jobs. Women in wood dust-exposed jobs appeared to have an excess of squamous cell carcinoma; an increased risk of this disease in men was seen only among those employed for 30 or more years in jobs with exposure to fresh wood. Results support the association between exposure to wood dust and the risk of sino-nasal adenocarcinoma. Evidence regarding squamous cell carcinomas is ambiguous. (66501)

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CIS 96-834 Occupational respiratory cancer and exposure to asbestos: A case-control study in a cohort of workers in the electricity and gas industry. Imbernon E., Goldberg M., Bonenfant S., Chevalier A., Guénel P., Vatré R., Dehaye J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.339-352. 36 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0834.pdf

In a study of male workers in the French electricity and gas industry between 1978 and 1989, cases of cancer of the pleura (12), lung cancer (310) and cancer of the larynx (116) were matched with controls from within the same company. Exposure to asbestos and other substances was estimated using a job-exposure matrix specific to the company. There was a clear association between asbestos exposure and pleural cancer. Some association between asbestos exposure and lung cancer was observed in the two highest cumulative exposure categories. Occupational exposure to asbestos could increase the risk of pleural and lung cancer even at relatively low exposure levels. (66513)

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CIS 96-835 Postural stability assessment in sewer workers. Kuo W., Bhattacharya A., Succop P., Linz D., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.38, No.1, p.27-34. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0835.pdf

In a study to assess central nervous system effects in workers at a wastewater treatment plant, postural stability was measured in 28 workers performing postural sway tests on a microcomputer-based force platform. Exposure to airborne organic solvents was determined by means of a photo-ionization detector. A positive correlation was demonstrated between postural sway and organic solvent exposure. The workers also had increased postural sway compared with a nonexposed population. Given the very low exposures measured, it is possible that solvent exposure may not be the causative agent, but that the solvent levels may correlate with some other causative exposure. (66612)

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CIS 96-836 Occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the risk of bladder cancer: A French case-control study. Clavel J., Mandereau L., Limasset J.C., Hémon D., Cordier S., International Journal of Epidemiology, Dec. 1994, Vol.23, No.6, p.1145-1153. 30 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0836.pdf

A hospital-based case-control study of 658 male cases of bladder cancer and 658 male controls was carried out in 5 areas of France from 1984 to 1987. For each subject, occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was determined through questionnaires. The overall odds ratio for PAH exposure, adjusted for smoking, coffee drinking and occupational exposure to aromatic amines was estimated at 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-1.7, p<0.05). A slight but clear dose-response relationship was observed, and the trend remained significant after adjustment for cumulative smoking, with odds ratios of 1.2 (95% CI: 0.9-1.7), 1.4 (95% CI: 0.9-2.2) and 1.8 (95% CI: 0.8-3.9) for low, medium and high average exposures respectively compared to subjects unexposed to PAH (p<0.05). Moreover, a stronger association between bladder cancer and PAH exposure was detected in a heavy-smoker group. (66625)

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CIS 96-837 Effects of occupational lead exposure on motor and somatosensory evoked potentials. Lille F., Margules S., Fournier E., Dally S., Garnier R., Neurotoxicology, Fall 1994, Vol.15, No.3, p.679-683. Illus. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0837.pdf

In order to determine the exact effects of inorganic lead compounds on the nervous system, 17 occupationally exposed men were tested for Motor Electric Potentials (MEPs) of the abductor policis brevis muscles with transcranial, cervical root and peripheral electrical stimulations, for Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs) of the median and tibial posterior nerves, and for electromyography (EMG). Sixteen of the 17 subjects exhibited electrophysiological abnormalities, occurring at both peripheral and central levels for the somatosensory as well as for the motor systems. Lead exposure was also related to decreased sensory and motor peripheral conduction velocities, increased motor central conduction time, and delayed cortical P22 SEPs component that could be interpreted as a sensory-motor cortical dysfunction. The respective contributions of MEPs and SEPs are compared to clinical, biological and EMG examinations in the evaluation of the neurotoxic effects of inorganic lead compounds. (66647)

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CIS 96-838 Silica exposure and autoimmune diseases. Steenland K., Goldsmith D.F., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Nov. 1995, Vol.28, No.5, p.603-608. 24 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0838.pdf

Epidemiologic evidence of an association between silica exposure and autoimmune diseases is summarized and some plausible mechanisms are briefly discussed. Diseases considered include sclerosis, scleroderma, arthritis, lupus and chronic renal disease. The link between silica exposure and autoimmune disease may have been missed in cohort mortality studies because such diseases are rarely underlying causes of death. Similarly, case-control studies of autoimmune diseases have often failed to consider occupational exposure to silica. Further research is required to verify this association. (66670)

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CIS 96-839 Cross-sectional follow-up of a flu-like respiratory illness among fiberglass manufacturing employees - Endotoxin exposure associated with two distinct sequelae. Milton D.K., Amsel J., Reed C.E., Enright P.L., Brown L.R., Aughenbaugh G.L., Morey P.R., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.469-488. 60 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0839.pdf

Employees at a glass fibre manufacturing plant experienced sporadic flu-like symptoms following exposure to a recirculated washwater mist containing high concentrations of gram-negative bacteria and endotoxins. Among 20 subjects reporting a history of severe flu-like episodes, diffusion capacity was significantly lower than for other workers; the illness was more common among workers with intermittent exposure (19 cases) rather than daily exposure (1 case). Asthma was prevalent in the study population, particularly among employees with daily rather than intermittent exposure. Endotoxin exposure was associated with two distinct sequelae depending on the temporal pattern of exposure. (66732)

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CIS 96-840 Incidence of cancer and exposure to toluene diisocyanate and methylene diphenyldiisocyanate - A cohort based case-referent study in the polyurethane foam manufacturing industry. Hagmar L., Strömberg U., Welinder H., Mikoczy Z., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Nov. 1993, Vol.50, No.11, p.1003-1007. Illus. 15 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0840.pdf

The aim of this study was to assess the association between occupational exposure to toluene diisocyanate or methylene diphenyldiisocyanate and the risk of cancer. The study group comprised 7,023 subjects employed during the period 1958 to 1987 in nine Swedish polyurethane foam manufacturing plants. The tentative associations, derived from a previous cohort study, between isocyanate exposure and excess risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rectal cancer were not confirmed. Instead, non-significant associations with prostate cancer, and possibly colon cancer, were observed. (66811)

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CIS 96-841 Study of occupational lung cancer in asbestos factories in China. Huilan Z., Zhiming W., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Nov. 1993, Vol.50, No.11, p.1039-1042. 7 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0841.pdf

A retrospective cohort study (1972-81) of occupational cancers in asbestos (chrysotile) factories was previously published. In this paper the results of continued tracing and interviewing of members of this cohort, comprising 5,893 persons, between 1982 to 1986, is reported. Malignant tumours played an important role in causes of death (36.9%). There were 183 cancers and 67 lung cancers among 496 deaths. The mortality due to lung cancer had a tendency to increase. By comparison with a control group, the RR of lung cancer was 5.32 (p<0.01), and the SRR of lung cancer was 4.2 (p<0.01), significantly higher than those of the control group. Among 148 cases of death from asbestosis there were 33 cases complicated with lung cancer (22.3%). The dose-response relations between exposure to asbestos and incidence of asbestosis and lung cancer were also studied in one asbestos factory. There was a positive correlation. A synergistic effect was found between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. (66814)

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CIS 96-842 Dental health in workers previously exposed to mercury vapour at a chloralkali plant. Holland R.I., Ellingsen D.G., Olstad M.L., Kjuus H., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oct. 1994, Vol.51, No.10, p.656-659. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0842.pdf

The dental health of 73 workers previously exposed to mercury vapour at a chloralkali plant was studied and compared with that of 51 non-exposed referents. A record of oral, periodontal, gingival and mucosal conditions, including teeth, restorations, prostheses and oral hygiene, was established during a 30min examination. There was no significant difference between the exposed workers and the referents with respect to the number of remaining teeth, amount of amalgam restorations, crowns, bridges, or endodontically treated teeth. The oral hygiene among the exposed workers was significantly better than among the referents, but the periodontal health conditions did not significantly differ between the two groups, nor from those of another Norwegian population. The present results seem to contradict previous reports claiming tooth loss as a possible result of exposure to mercury vapour. (66826)

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CIS 96-843 Outcome of job change in patients with occupational chromate dermatitis. Lips R., Rast H., Elsner P., Contact Dermatitis, Apr. 1996, Vol.34, No.4, p.268-271. Illus. 9 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0843.pdf

Patients with allergic contact dermatitis due to dichromate are reputed to have a bad prognosis. Under the Swiss Law on Accident Insurance, the Swiss National Accident Insurance Organization may issue a declaration of medical incapacity (DMI) in cases of severe occupational dichromate dermatitis. With such a DMI, an employee is not allowed to perform any further work bringing him into contact with dichromate or cement. In this study, medical records from 88 construction workers with such DMIs between 1986 and 1989 were reviewed. Follow-up was performed by standardized questionnaire: 63 patients (72%) recovered in the first few years after DMI. The majority of these patients had changed industry and strictly avoided all contact with cement or chromium salts and a few had retired early. The outcome of the study was favourable in comparison with studies from other countries without the DMI mechanism. Strict allergen avoidance, enforced by authorities, and financial support in the case of job change are crucial in improving the prognosis in occupational dichromate dermatitis. (66843)

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CIS 96-844 Use of biologic markers for toxic end-points in assessment of risks from exposure to chemicals. Mercier M.J., Robinson A.E., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1993, Vol.65, No.1 (supplement), p.S7-S10. Illus. 7 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0844.pdf

The National Research Council in the US defines biological markers as "indicators signalling events in biological systems or samples". Examples of biological markers are carboxyhaemoglobin in carbon monoxide exposure, pulmonary function change in response to exposure to the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen or to formaldehyde, cholinesterase inhibition due to exposure to organophosphorus compounds and measurement of DNA- or haem-adducts to assess the effects of exposure to carcinogens. The factors which influence the selection of a biological marker are discussed. Recommendations for use in quantitative risk assessment are given. (66884)

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CIS 96-845 Ethylene glycol ethers and risks of spontaneous abortion and subfertility. Correa A., Gray R.H., Cohe R., Rothman N., Shah F., Seacat H., Corn M., American Journal of Epidemiology, Apr. 1996, Vol.143, No.7, p.707-717. 38 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0845.pdf

Occupational exposures to ethylene glycol ethers (EGE) are of concern since their reproductive toxicity has been well documented in animal studies. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among workers at two semiconductor manufacturing plants in the eastern United States in 1980-1989. Assessment of potential exposure to mixtures containing EGE was based on reported processes and company records. Among female workers potential exposure to mixtures containing EGE was associated with increased risks of spontaneous abortion and subfertility. Both of these risks exhibited a dose-response relation. Among spouses of male worker potentially exposed to mixtures containing EGE, there was no increased risk of spontaneous abortion, but a nonsignificant increased risk of subfertility was ascertained. (66924)

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CIS 96-846 Contribution to the definition of neurobehavioural methods for occupational medicine: From a rigid physiognomy to a variable geometry structure. (Italian: Contributo ad una definizione di metodi neurocomportamentali per la medicina del lavoro: da una fisionomia rigida ad una struttura a geometria variabile) Camerino D., Cassito M.G., Fanelli C., Fattorini E., Giglioli R., Prevenzione oggi, Oct.-Dec. 1994, Vol.6, No.4, p.139-162. 43 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0846.pdf

The International Network for Computer-Based Neurobehavioural Evaluation of Toxicity (INCNET), working since many years in the field of behavioural neurotoxicology, has developed a questionnaire software, based on a string of neurobehavioural tests called EUNES (European Neurobehavioural Evaluation System). The target is the multi-centre evaluation of the effects on the central nervous system of subjects occupationally exposed to solvents. (66928)

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CIS 96-847 Acute and subchronic neurotoxicity studies with tri-N-butyl phosphate in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Healy C.E., Beyrouty P.C., Broxup B.R., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Apr. 1995, Vol.56, No.4, p.349-355. Illus. 17 ref. ### (In English)

This study showed that tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), a liquid phosphate ester used as a component in the production of airline hydraulic fluids, has no appreciable neurotoxic effect on rats. (67046)

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CIS 96-848 Development of a new qualitative test for fit testing respirators. Mullins H.E., Danisch S.G., Johnston A.R., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1068-1073. Illus. 27 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0848.pdf

A qualitative fit test was developed using Bitrex¿ (denatonium benzoate) as the test agent. It was validated by running a series of paired fit tests on subjects wearing NIOSH-approved half mask respirators fitted with high efficiency filters. Quantitative tests were conducted with a small corn oil aerosol. Qualitative fit tests were run with Bitrex and saccharin, following the established protocol for the saccharin fit test. The Bitrex and saccharin tests were found to have virtually the same performance. Bitrex is a good alternative to consider for qualitative fit testing. (66321)

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CIS 96-849 The assigned protection factor of 10 for half-mask respirators. Nelson T.J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.717-724. Illus. 29 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0849.pdf

Studies on the performance of half-mask air purifying respirators were analyzed. Using data from seven selected studies, 1.5% of the workplace protection factor (WPF) values were less than 10, the best estimate of the fifth percentile was 13, with a 95% confidence interval of 10 to 18. This appears to support the assigned protection factor of 10 for this class of respirators. Differences between the mean WPF based on the type of filter were found, but no difference was found between the mean performance of elastomeric and disposable respirators equipped with dust/mist and dust/fume/mist filters. (66360)

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CIS 96-850 Evaluation of proposed methods to update human testing of self-contained breathing apparatus. Turner N., Beeckman D., Hodous T., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1195-1200. Illus. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0850.pdf

Proposed use test protocols for the human testing of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) were evaluated. Unlike the current NIOSH tests, the proposed tests use a continuous monitoring technique and provide the ability to test apparatus at consistent absolute work rates regardless of the body weight of the subject. The proposed tests were evaluated for four different SCBAs worn by seven subjects in three body weight categories. The proposed test protocols could form the basis for eventual recommendations to revise the current tests for SCBA performance evaluation. (66414)

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CIS 96-851 Field performance measurements of half-facepiece respirators - Paint spraying operations. Zhuang Z., Myers W.R., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.50-57. Illus. 11 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0851.pdf

Workplace protection factors were measured for three half-facepiece respirators fitted with combination high-efficiency filter/organic vapour cartridge air-purifying elements. Exposures to aluminium, chlorine, chromium, silicon, strontium and titanium were estimated during aircraft paint-spraying operations. Ambient and in-facepiece concentrations of all elements combined and of titanium and chromium are tabulated along with workplace protection factors by shift, location, worker, respirator and type of paint application. When these respirators were conscientiously worn, used in conjunction with existing controls, and were properly maintained, they ensured an effective protection of workers. (66486)

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CIS 96-852 Field measurements of half-facepiece respirators - Foundry operations. Myers W.R., Zhuang Z., Nelson T., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.166-174. 13 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0852.pdf

Workplace protection factors provided by elastomeric and disposable half-facepiece respirators were calculated from the ratio of ambient and in-facepiece concentrations of dust and fume exposures at three foundries. The main components of the airborne exposures were zinc, lead and silicon. The main components of the in-facepiece samples were zinc, chlorine and lead. While significant differences were observed in ambient zinc and lead concentrations among foundries, no significant difference was observed in the in-facepiece concentrations of these elements among foundries. The in-facepiece penetration data clearly indicate that these respirators, when conscientiously used and maintained, and in conjunction with existing controls, provide effective worker protection. (66777)

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CIS 96-853 Self-reported use of respiratory protection among a cohort of underground bituminous coal miners. Jennison E.A., Odencrantz J.R., Sembower K., Petsonk E.L., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.191-195. 17 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0853.pdf

Patterns of self-reported respirator use were analyzed in a cohort of 193 underground bituminous coal miners who were followed for five years. Based on 1370 responses, the mean percentage of time that a respirator was worn was 18.9% for all subjects; 39.8% reported no respirator usage. Face workers reported wearing respirators a mean of 28.1% of the time compared with 9.8% for nonface workers and 3.0% for supervisors. Higher tenure was associated with lower respirator use. Further studies are needed to relate patterns of respirator use to temporal changes in coal mine dust exposure. (66780)

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CIS 96-854 Welding helmet airborne fume concentrations compared to personal breathing zone sampling. Liu D., Wong H., Quinlan P., Blanc P.D., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Mar. 1995, Vol.56, No.3, p.280-283. Illus. 14 ref. ### (In English)

(67042)

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CIS 96-855 Characterization of emission sources in buildings and HVAC systems: Quantification and uncertainty. Batterman S.A., Luoma M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1083-1089. Illus. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0855.pdf

The use of in situ mass balance techniques to characterize emission sources in buildings and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems is described. The techniques use flow and concentration measurements taken in the building or HVAC system from which contaminant fluxes and emissions are computed. Uncertainties in results caused by measurement errors and variability in observed concentrations and flows are discussed, and the accuracy of emission estimates derived in this way is evaluated. Results show the required measurement accuracies for various source and building conditions. (66323)

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CIS 96-856 The sensitive individual and the indoor environment: Case study. Martin J.R., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1121-1126. Illus. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0856.pdf

An environmental investigation was carried out in an office building following occupant reports of health problems suspected of being associated with the indoor environment. No conditions likely to cause the reported health problems were indicated. One occupant was experiencing a fairly severe reaction only upon entering the building but no specific explanation was identified; a possible allergic reaction to materials within the building was suggested. The case highlights the role of the occupational physician in environmental investigations and the need to consider the possible presence of sensitive individuals. (66328)

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CIS 96-857 Evaluation of chemical exposures in the hazardous waste industry. Pedersen B.A., Higgins G.M., Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, Feb. 1995, Vol.45, p.89-94. Illus. 6 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0857.pdf

The assessment of personnel exposure to volatile solvent vapours is an important aspect in any comprehensive health and safety programme. This is particularly true at Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDFs) and for industries dealing with volatile solvents. This paper presents organic vapour monitoring data from seven TSDFs and from several routine small business and household activities. It shows that proper controls at TSDFs effectively reduce personnel vapour exposure. Through an examination of data from a specialized business such as a TSDF, along with data from more routine activities, a different perspective arises regarding potential hazards associated with hazardous waste disposal activities. (66640)

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CIS 96-858 Sensory irritation in mice exposed to emissions from indoor products. Muller W.J., Black M.S., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Aug. 1995, Vol.56, No.8, p.794-803. Illus. 22 ref. ### (In English)

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CIS 96-859 Urinary excretion of tetrahydropht[h]alimide in fruit growers with dermal exposure to captan. de Cock J., Heederik D., Hoek F., Boleij J., Kromhout H., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.245-256. Illus. 29 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0859.pdf

Uptake of captan by pesticide applicators was measured by urinary monitoring of its metabolite, tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI). Respiratory and dermal exposures were estimated by personal air sampling and skin patches. Dermal exposure showed a clear relation to THPI in urine when exposure was estimated from skin pads on the ankles and neck. No relation was found for total dermal exposure or for respiratory exposure. Protection of the skin by using a cabin on the tractor and wearing rubber boots resulted in a lower uptake of captan. Results indicate that the skin is the major route of absorption and that there is an apparent contribution of specific body areas. (66508)

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CIS 96-860 Determinants of disability in illnesses related to agricultural use of organophosphates (OPs) in California. Weinbaum Z., Schenker M.B., O'Malley M.A., Gold E.B., Samuels S.J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.257-274. Illus. 29 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0860.pdf

Data on reported occupational illness related to organophosphate (OP) exposure in California were examined for the period 1984-1988. 878 cases of systemic illness and 199 cases of skin disease or eye injury were identified. Factors associated with severe systemic illness were identified as: contact with OP residue on commodities or in the field; mixing, loading and application activities; increased numbers of OPs per exposure; exposure to diethyl rather than dimethyl compounds. Results highlight factors to be targeted in the prevention or reduction of OP exposures. (66509)

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CIS 96-861 Pesticide exposure during greenhouse applications. Part I: Dermal exposure reduction due to directional ventilation and worker training; Part II: Chemical permeation through protective clothing in contact with treated foliage. Methner M.M., Fenske R.A., Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, Aug. 1994, Vol.9, No.8, p.560-574. Illus. 49 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0861.pdf

Workers conducted benchtop handgunning spray operations in commercial greenhouses with the ventilation system either on or off. Both video-imaging analysis and patch sampling indicated that when spray painting occurred with ventilation on rather than off, dermal exposure was reduced for experienced applicators, but increased for inexperienced applicators. No difference was observed between the two groups with ventilation off. Protective clothing performance was evaluated with particular reference to the hazard of contact with wet or treated foliage. Breakthrough times for four commercially available garments are reported. It was concluded that none of the garments can be considered chemical resistant under the use conditions observed. Contact with treated foliage represents a special hazard during greenhouse applications, and many chemical protective clothing products in current use are inadequate for worker protection. These products should be redesigned and field-tested. (66650)

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CIS 96-862 Time to pregnancy and occupational exposure to pesticides in fruit growers in the Netherlands. de Cock J., Westveer K., Heederik D., Te Velde E., Van Kooij R., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oct. 1994, Vol.51, No.10, p.693-699. Illus. 29 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0862.pdf

This explorative study investigates the relation between exposure of the fruit grower to pesticides and fecundability (probability of pregnancy) in a population of fruit growers. The analysis was based on self-reported data and included 91 pregnancies during 1978-1990 of 43 couples. Cox' proportional hazards model was used to analyze time to pregnancy after correction for gravidity and consultation with a physician for fertility problems. Application of pesticides solely by the owner was associated with a long time to pregnancy, resulting in a fecundability ratio of 0.46. Similarly a low spraying velocity resulted in a fecundability ratio of 0.47 and was associated with the use of older spraying techniques and tractors without a cabin. The effect of high exposure was mainly apparent if the couple had intended to become pregnant in the period from March-November (fecundability ratio 0.42). In the high exposure group 28% of the pregnancies had been preceded by consulting a physician because of fertility problems, compared with 8% in the low exposure group. These findings indicate that an adverse effect of exposure to pesticides on fecundability is likely. (66829)

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CIS 96-863 Contact dermatitis due to a new fungicide used in the tulip bulb industry. Bruynzeel D.P., Tafelkruijer J., Wilks M.F., Contact Dermatitis, July 1995, Vol.33, No.1, p.8-11. Illus. 6 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0863.pdf

An outbreak of contact dermatitis in a tulip bulb processing company is described. Shortly after the introduction of a new pesticide, the fungicide fluazinam, employees started to complain of dermatitis of the arms and the face. Eight employees were investigated and showed positive patch tests to fluazinam. The dermatitis disappeared quickly when they stopped work, but returned as soon as they restarted. Subsequent investigations showed that the fungicide had not been used according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Fluazinam was shown to be a strong sensitizer under these circumstances. (66891)

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CIS 96-864 Longitudinal and cross sectional analyses of exposure to coal mine dust and pulmonary function in new miners. Seixas N.S., Robins T.G., Attfield M.D., Moulton L.H., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1993, Vol.50, No.10, p.929-937. 30 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0864.pdf

The association between exposure to dust and pulmonary function was studied by longitudinal and cross-section analyses in a group of US underground coal miners beginning work in or after 1970. The cohort included 977 miners examined both in round two (R2)(1972-75) and round four (R4)(1985-88) of the National Study of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis. The results indicated a rapid initial (at R2) loss of FVC and FEV1 in association with cumulative exposure of the order of 30mL per mg/m3-years. After some 15 years since first exposure (at R4), a statistically significant association of cumulative exposure with FEV1 of about -5.9mL per mg/m3-years was found. These results indicate a significant non-linear effect of exposure to dust on pulmonary function at dust concentrations present after regulations took effect. The initial responses in both the FVC and FEV1 are consistent with inflammation of the small airways in response to exposure to dust. (66749)

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CIS 96-865 Lead exposure during removal of old paint from wood. (German: Bleigefährdung bei der Entfernung älterer Holzanstriche) Elliehausen H.J., Böhm R., Feikert G., Gross D., Arbeitsmedizin - Sozialmedizin - Umweltmedizin, Oct. 1995, Vol.30, No.11, p.499-502. Illus. 8 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0865.pdf

Lead-containing paint on wooden window frames and doors is usually removed with pressurized hot air or by propane gas flame cleaning followed by sanding. Following a case of acute lead intoxication during this kind of work, the lead concentrations in personal air samples taken at the workplace of 17 workers were determined as well as the lead concentrations in the blood of some of these workers. Lead concentrations exceeded the exposure limit regardless of the paint removal method used. It is recommended that respirators be worn for this kind of work. (66855)

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CIS 96-866 Occupational allergic contact dermatitis in construction workers. Congé-Salazar L., Guimaraens D., Villegas C., Romero A., Gonzalez M.A., Contact Dermatitis, Oct. 1995, Vol.33, No.4, p.226-230. Illus. 29 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0866.pdf

The patch test results of 449 construction workers who came as patients to the Occupational Dermatology Service of the Instituto Nacional de Medicina y Seguridad del Trabajo in Madrid between 1989 and 1993 are reported. Of these, 90.8% were patch tested because they had cutaneous lesions or a clinical history suggestive of occupational dermatitis. Of those patch tested 65.5% (268) showed one or more reactions connected with their work. Chromate at 41.1% was the main allergen, followed by cobalt: 20.5%, nickel: 10%, and epoxy resin: 7.5%. 25.9% (106) of patients showed sensitization to rubber components, the majority at 23.7% to thiuram mix, with TETD being the main allergen. (66897)

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CIS 96-867 Pancreatic cancer among workers processing synthetic resins. Selenskas S., Teta M.J., Vitale J.N., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.385-398. Illus. 41 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0867.pdf

An excess of pancreatic cancer identified at a plastics facility in New Jersey, USA was investigated. Workplace exposures were compared for 28 male pancreatic cancer cases and 140 controls. Workers assigned to a work area that processed vinyl resins and polyethylene were at increased risk. Men assigned more than 16 years to this department had a significantly increased risk; no excess was seen with shorter duration assignments. Average latency was 32 years. It is likely that the pancreatic cancer is associated with prolonged exposure to the products of vinyl processing. (66517)

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CIS 96-868 Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide in the sour gas industry - Some unresolved issues. Guidotti T.L., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1994, Vol.66, No.3, p.153-160. Illus. 54 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0868.pdf

This literature survey deals with the effects of exposure to hydrogen sulfide in the natural gas industry. It is stressed that the acute toxicity of hydrogen sulfide is well known. However, exposure-response data are confined to lethal doses. There is some evidence that long-term exposure to hydrogen sulfide causes eye irritation. Further studies are needed for confirmation. (66889)

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CIS 96-869 Investigative industrial hygiene: Airborne lead concentrations during arc gouging in confined spaces. Harris M.K., Carter S.R., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1994, Vol.55, No.12, p.1188-1192. 10 ref. ### (In English)

Determination of airborne lead concentrations during arc gouging in confined spaces in a petroleum refinery. (67034)

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CIS 96-870 Upper airway symptoms and function in wood surface coating industry workers. Holmström M., Granstrand P., Nylander-French L.A., Rosén G., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.207-220. 55 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0870.pdf

Respiratory and ocular symptoms were investigated in workers employed in the surface coating of wood products using either ultraviolet radiation curing (UV) or acid curing (AC). Symptoms were investigated by questionnaire and medical examination among surface coating line workers, finishing workers and a control group. Nasal, pharyngeal and ocular symptoms of discomfort were common among all exposed groups. Symptoms were most frequent in UV line workers and finishers of UV coated wood products. Mucociliary clearance was significantly slower in UV line workers. Low levels of organic solvents and coating dusts were measured in the workers' breathing zones. (66505)

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CIS 96-871 Neurobehavioral effects of acute and chronic mixed-solvent exposure in the screen printing industry. White R.F., Proctor S.P., Echeverria D., Schweikert J., Feldman R.G., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.221-231. 32 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0871.pdf

Neuropsychological assessments were carried out on 30 workers in a screen printing business. Air sampling indicated the presence of toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, mineral spirits, β-ether, methylene chloride and acetic acid. Exposure levels varied throughout the plant but were all were below recommended threshold limit values. Workers with higher acute exposure demonstrated impaired test performance on tasks involving manual dexterity, visual memory and mood. Those with chronic exposure demonstrated poorer performance on visual memory tasks and mood. Results suggest that the mixed solvents used in the screen printing industry have an effect on central nervous system functioning in the absence of obvious clinical disease. (66506)

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CIS 96-872 Autonomic and central nervous system effects of lead in female glass workers in China. Murata K., Araki S., Yokoyama K., Nomiyama K., Nomiyama H., Tao Y.X., Liu S.J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.233-244. Illus. 47 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0872.pdf

Autonomic and central nervous system functions were measured in 36 female lead-exposed workers and in a nonexposed control group. Measurements included electrocardiographic R-R interval variability (CVRR) and visual and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (VEP and BAEP). All parameters of autonomic nervous system function except heart rate were significantly depressed in the exposed workers compared with the nonexposed group. The exposed group also had more complaints of subjective symptoms. No significant differences in either VEP or BAEP latencies were found between the two groups. It is suggested that autonomic nervous function is more susceptible to lead than are visual and auditory nervous functions; lead affects sympathetic activity more strongly than parasympathetic activity. (66507)

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CIS 96-873 Contact sensitization to organosilane solution in glass filament production. Heino T., Haapa K., Manelius F., Contact Dermatitis, Apr. 1996, Vol.34, No.4, p.294. Illus. 2 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0873.pdf

Following recent reports of sensitization to silanes used as bonding agents between glass and resin in the coating of glass filaments, 61 workers in a glass fibre factory were exposed to a new coating mixture which contained polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, acetic acid and organosilane solution. At the same time, six other coating solutions were also in use. Eight workers developed an itchy erythematous papular dermatitis on parts of the body directly in contact with coating solutions. All had dermatitis on the hands, wrists and forearms, and, in addition, three on the face and the neck. All eight patients were patch tested with the standard series, a series of plastics and glues, and 20 substances in the coatings. Six out of eight patients tested were positive to one or more substances and, in all of these, occupational allergic contact dermatitis was confirmed. Five reacted to epoxy resin and two to formaldehyde, present in one coating solution as preservative. Organosilane solution is an important source of contact sensitization in the production of glass filaments. (66845)

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CIS 96-874 Immediate allergic reaction to latex. (German: Soforttypallergie auf Naturlatex) Fuchs T., Dermatosen in Beruf und Umwelt, Sep.-Oct. 1995, Vol. 43, No.5, p.230. 4 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0874.pdf

The following immediate allergies have been reported to be caused by protective gloves made of latex: contact dermatitis, urticaria, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma and anaphylactic shock. The frequency rates of immediate allergic reactions to latex among medical personnel are between seven and 10%. Protective gloves made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) rarely cause any immediate allergies. However, due to its carcinogenic properties and for ecological reasons, protective gloves made of PVC are not recommended for use as a substitute for latex gloves. Protective gloves made of synthetic rubbers such as neoprene are recommended instead for use by medical personnel. (66852)

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CIS 96-875 High exposures to organic solvents among graffiti removers. Anundi H., Lind M.L., Friis L., Itkes N., Langworth S., Edling C., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1993, Vol.65, No.4. p.247-251. Illus. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0875.pdf

The average 8h exposure to dichloromethane of 12 graffiti removers in underground stations in Sweden ranged from 18 to 1,200mg/m3. For 50% of the workers, the average exposure was above the limit of 120mg/m3. The breathing zone concentrations of other solvents such as glycol ethers, trimethylbenzenes and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone were low or not detectable. While irritative symptoms of the eyes and upper respiratory tract were more prevalent than in the general population, neither exposure-related deviations of the indicators of liver damage nor acute effects on the central nervous system were found. The workers were advised to use half-mask respirators and to avoid skin contact by wearing protective clothing. (66882)

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CIS 96-876 Guidelines for management of health care wastes in Hungary. Horváth A., Central European Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1995, Vol.1, No.1, p.87-99. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0876.pdf

Guidelines for the management of health care waste in Hungary are outlined: definition and classification of different waste types; requirements for collection, packaging, marking, storage and transport of wastes; incineration; pretreatment (disinfection); accident prevention and use of personal protective equipment; contents of a waste management plan for hospitals. (66975)

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CIS 96-877 Occupational skin diseases in dental laboratory technicians. (I) Clinical picture and causative factors. Rustemeyer T., Frosch P.J., Contact Dermatitis, Feb. 1996, Vol.34, No.2, p.125-133. 39 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0877.pdf

In a questionnaire survey of 173 dental technicians, 29% reported work-related skin symptoms. Among the 55 technicians who were examined, allergic contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 63.6%, and irritant contact dermatitis in 23.6%. Most of the allergens identified were found in plastic materials, in particular, acrylates and methacrylates. A computer data base of dental materials was developed with information on product ingredients. The main irritant factors included wet work, contact with plaster, mechanical friction and thermal changes. Strategies for prevention should focus on reduction of irritant factors and safer use of (meth)acrylates. (66979)

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CIS 96-878 Tumor markers in serum, polyamines and modified nucleosides in urine, and cytogenic aberrations in lymphocytes of workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Buchet J.P., Ferreira M., Burrion J.B., Leroy T., Kirsch-Volders M., Van Hummelen P., Jacques J., Cupers L., Delavignette J.P., Lauwerys R., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1995, Vol.27, No.4, p.523-543. 60 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0878.pdf

The concentration of several tumour markers in blood, the excretion of polyamines and modified nucleosides in urine, and the presence of cytogenic aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes (sister-chromatid exchanges, high frequency cells (HFC), and micronuclei) were measured in 149 workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results were related to PAH exposure parameters. HFC was the biomarker most consistently associated with the intensity of current exposure to PAHs. Based on the prevalence of abnormal HFC values, it is suggested that the concentration of PAHs in air should be kept below 6.4µg/m3 and the concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene in postshift urine below 2.7µg/g creatinine. Associations between other biomarkers and exposure parameters were weak. (66287)

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CIS 96-879 Work-site clinical and neurobehavioral assessment of solvent-exposed microelectronics workers. Broadwell D.K., Darcey D.J., Hudnell H.K., Otto D.A., Boyes W.K., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.677-698. Illus. 83 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0879.pdf

Clinical and neurobehavioural assessments were carried out among 25 microelectronics workers and a matched control group. Retrospective exposure assessments in the study group suggested chronic low-level exposure to solvents, with intermittent acute exposures. Results of neurobehavioural tests indicated that the exposed group had measurable deficits in sensory, motor and cognitive function. They also reported more medical symptoms and altered mood states. Three workers had findings consistent with a solvent-induced encephalopathy. Results support an association between chronic low-dose solvent exposure and measurable neurobehavioural changes. (66314)

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CIS 96-880 Patch test results in hairdressers with contact dermatitis in Greece (1985-1994). Katsarou A., Koufou B., Takou K., Kalogeromitros D., Papanayiotou G., Vareltzidis A., Contact Dermatitis, Nov. 1995, Vol.33, No.5, p.347-348. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0880.pdf

Hairdressers referred to a contact dermatitis clinic were patch tested with the European standard series and with a hairdressers' series. One or more positive reactions to hairdressers' allergens were seen in 50 (47%) of the 106 patients. 32 (30%) were reactive only to non-hairdressers' allergens, and 24 (23%) were negative to all allergens tested. The predominantly young female hairdressers studied had a high frequency of nickel sensitivity compared to other females at the clinic. Of the hairdressers' allergens, the most positive patch test reactions were to p-phenylenediamine and ammonium persulfate. (66349)

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CIS 96-881 Decreases of CD4- and CD8-positive T lymphocytes in retired chromate workers. Tanigawa T., Araki S., Araki T., Minato N., Yokoyama K., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.877-882. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0881.pdf

To investigate the effects of chromates on the human immune system, total T lymphocytes and their two major subpopulations (CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes) were measured in the peripheral blood of 19 retired chromate-exposed chemical workers. The numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were significantly lower than in a non-exposed control group; total T lymphocytes and total lymphocytes were also lower. Results indicate significant decreases in T lymphocytes in this population considered to be at high-risk of occupational lung cancer, prior to clinical diagnosis of the disease. (66438)

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CIS 96-882 Effect of lead on blood pressure in occupationally nonexposed men. Wolf C., Wallnöfer A., Waldhör T., Vutuc C., Meisinger V., Rüdiger H.W., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.897-903. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0882.pdf

In a survey of 507 males with no occupational exposure to lead, the effects of age, weight, height, alcohol intake, nicotine consumption and blood lead on blood pressure were investigated. Both the diastolic and systolic blood pressure were significantly influenced by the body mass index, age and alcohol. A significant effect of lead could only be found for diastolic blood pressure. Results indicate that even in low concentrations, the influence of lead on diastolic blood pressure may be significant in this group of middle-aged men. (66440)

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CIS 96-883 Immunological reactions and respiratory function in wool textile workers. Zuskin E., Kanceljak B., Mustajbegovic J., Godnic-Cvar J., Schachter E.N., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.445-456. 31 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0883.pdf

Immunological status and respiratory function were studied in a group of 64 wool textile workers and in 46 unexposed controls. Skin testing was performed with different wool allergens and with common allergens. Compared to the control group, the wool workers showed a higher prevalence of positive skin tests to all allergens, increased serum IgE levels and a higher prevalence of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms. Significant across-shift reductions in ventilatory capacity were recorded in the wool workers, as well as abnormal baseline lung function. In general, the prevalence of symptoms and the lung function abnormalities did not correlate with the results of specific (wool) skin tests. (66443)

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CIS 96-884 Cancer risk due to occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Nadon L., Siemiatycki J., Dewar R., Krewski D., Gérin M., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.303-324. 52 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0884.pdf

In a study of 3,730 cancer patients and 533 controls in Montreal, Canada, associations were analyzed between 14 cancer types and exposure to six types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A detailed job history was obtained from each subject along with information on potential confounders. For most types of cancer evaluated, there was no evidence of excess risk due to PAHs at the levels encountered. For a few cancer sites (oesophagus, pancreas and prostate gland), there were suggestions of excess risk. For lung cancer, there appeared to be an increased risk due to PAHs among nonsmokers and light smokers, but not among heavy smokers. Limitations of the study are discussed. (66511)

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CIS 96-885 Update of the mortality experience of employees with occupational exposure to 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP). Olsen G.W., Bodner K.M, Stafford B.A, Cartmill J.B., Gondek M.R., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Sep. 1995, Vol.28, No.3, p.399-410. 36 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0885.pdf

The mortality experience of a cohort of 548 workers involved in the production of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane from 1957 to 1975 was followed to 1989. There were 68 total observed deaths (compared with 72.1 expected), 19 deaths from all malignancies (19 expected), and seven deaths from lung cancer (6.6 expected); among the 81 workers with direct exposure direct for one or more years, there were three lung cancer deaths (0.9 expected). While the study does not suggest an increased risk for all malignant neoplasm mortality, conclusions are limited by the size of the cohort and duration of follow-up. (66518)

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CIS 96-886 Bronchial symptoms and respiratory function in workers exposed to methylmethacrylate. Marez T., Edmé J.L., Boulenguez C., Shirali P., Haguenoer J.M., British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1993, Vol.50, No.10, p.894-897. 21 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0886.pdf

This study aimed to investigate the pulmonary effects of methylmethacrylate (MMA) in a group of occupationally exposed workers. In the exposed group 20% had chronic cough compared with 1% in controls. Spirometric values at the beginning of the workshift were similar in both groups, but a mild airways obstruction appeared during the workshift. The maximum expiratory flow when 50% of the forced vital capacity remained to be exhaled (MEF50) and the ratio of MEF50 to maximal expiratory flow (MEF50/MEF) decreased significantly during the workshift among exposed workers compared to controls (p = 0.04 and 0.01 respectively). Results remained unaffected after adjustment for smoking. Exposure to MMA seems to be responsible for a mild airways obstruction but further study on a larger population would be useful. (66746)

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CIS 96-887 Primary sensitization to a single accidental exposure to a flame retardant and subsequent allergic contact dermatitis. Parslew R., King C.M., Evans S., Contact Dermatitis, Oct. 1995, Vol.33, No.4, p.286. Illus. 3 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0887.pdf

Case report of a worker who suffered blistering of the skin after contact with a flame retardant containing 2,3-dibromocresylglycidyl ether. Corticosteroid treatment was effective. Patch testing verified sensitization to this compound. Primary sensitization resulting from a single exposure has been reported for several other substances, but not for this compound. (66898)

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CIS 96-888 Man made mineral fibers (MMMF): Health based recommended occupational exposure limits. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1995. 152p. approx. 210 ref., ISBN 90-5549-085-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0888.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the effects of occupational exposure to man-made mineral fibres (MMMF). The committee distinguishes six groups of MMMF depending on composition: continuous filament fibre glass, glass wool fibres, rock wool fibres, slag wool fibres, refractory ceramic fibres (RCF), and special purpose glass fibres. Attention is given to: identity, physical and chemical properties, monitoring; sources of exposure; environmental levels and human exposure; occupational guidelines and standards; toxicokinetics; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, chronic toxicity, mutagenicity/genotoxicity, reproduction toxicity, carcinogenicity); previous evaluations by (inter)national bodies; evaluation of human health risk. Based on the data available the committee recommends the following health-based occupational exposure limits: continuous filament fibre glass: reduction of skin and mucous membrane contact as far as possible; glass wool, rock wool, slag wool and special purpose glass fibres: for all types a HBR-OEL of 3 respirable fibres/mL, 8h TWA; refractory ceramic fibres: based on a non-genotoxic mechanism for their carcinogenicity a HBR-OEL of 1 respirable fibre/mL, 8h TWA. Summary in Dutch. (66403)

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CIS 96-889 The asbestos hazards handbook - A guide to safety at work, in the community and at home. London Hazards Centre, Interchange Studios, Dalby Street, London NW5 3NQ, United Kingdom, Dec. 1995. 144p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 12.00 (GBP 5.00 to trade unions and community groups)., ISBN 0-948974-13-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0889.pdf

This guide describes the health hazards of asbestos exposure, explains current regulations and urges further action to improve awareness of the risks and to control exposure. Contents: asbestos-related disease in the United Kingdom; exposure among construction workers and other high risk groups; health hazards (asbestosis, cancer); types of asbestos and their uses; legal requirements, employers' responsibilities and prosecutions for asbestos offences; safe removal of asbestos; waste disposal and contamination; compensation for asbestos victims; international activities. (66281)

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CIS 96-890 Update on benzene. Imbriani M., Ghittori S., Pezzagno G., Capodaglio E., eds., Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri Edizioni, PI-ME Press, Viale Sardegna 64, Pavia 27100, Italy, May-Aug. 1995. xi, 265p. Illus. Bibl.ref., ISBN 88-7963-038-5 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0890.pdf

Collection of 22 papers concerning benzene exposure and monitoring. Among the topics covered: literature survey of recent studies on benzene exposure in various workplaces; factors influencing biological levels of benzene in humans; benzene-induced leukaemia; haematological changes due to benzene exposure; biological monitoring of low levels of benzene exposure; benzene determination in blood by gas chromatographic headspace analysis; biomarkers of benzene exposure in blood and urine; effect of smoking on biological monitoring of benzene exposure; investigation of benzene residues in chemical products. (66388)

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CIS 96-891 Chlorine dioxide: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1996. 57p. 41 ref., ISBN 90-5549-099-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0891.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the consequences of occupational exposure to chlorine dioxide and recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit. Attention is given to: identity, physical and chemical properties, monitoring; sources of exposure; environmental levels and human exposure; guidelines and standards; toxicokinetics; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, short-term toxicity, long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproduction toxicity); previous evaluations by other national and international bodies; hazard assessment. Based on the data available the committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit for chlorine dioxide of 0.3mg/m3 (0.1ppm). Since the gas's critical effects are related to its locally corrosive characteristics, the committee recommends that this limit be applied to the concentration averaged over a fifteen-minute period. Summary in Dutch. (66401)

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CIS 96-892 Formamide and dimethylformamide: Health based recommended occupational exposure limits. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1995. 128p. Illus. 84 ref., ISBN 90-5549-098-9 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0892.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the consequences of occupational exposure to formamide and dimethylformamide (DMF) and recommends health-based occupational exposure limits for these substances. Attention is given to: identity, physical and chemical properties, monitoring; sources of exposure; environmental levels and human exposure; toxicokinetics; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, short-term toxicity, long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproduction toxicity); previous evaluations by national and international bodies; evaluation of human health risk. Based on the data available the committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit for formamide of 16mg/m3 (9ppm) as an 8h TWA concentration. For dimethylformamide the committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit of 15mg/m3 (5ppm) as a 8h TWA concentration. Since skin absorption can contribute substantially to total body burden, a skin notation is recommended. Summary in Dutch. (66402)

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CIS 96-893 Cadmium and inorganic cadmium compounds: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1995. 92p. 98 ref., ISBN 90-5549-092-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0893.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the consequences of occupational exposure to cadmium (Cd) and its inorganic compounds. This assessment is an update of the criteria document published by the committee in 1980 (RA 5/80). Attention is given to: present guidelines and standards; chemical and physical characteristics; environmental and biological monitoring; toxicodynamics (including: non-tumorigenic effects on the respiratory tract, lung cancer risks, effects on the kidneys, and miscellaneous effects); previous evaluations by national and international bodies; evaluation of human health risk; recommendations for research. Based on the data available the committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit for cadmium and its inorganic compounds of 5µg/m3 (as Cd) as an eight-hour TWA. Epidemiological data show that below this level no increased lung tumour incidence is to be expected. For biological monitoring purposes, the committee recommends to use a concentration of 4µg Cd/g creatinine in urine as an upper limit. Summary in Dutch. (66404)

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CIS 96-894 Acetone cyanohydrin: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1995. 96p. Illus. 88 ref., ISBN 90-5549-093-8 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0894.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the consequences of occupational exposure to acetone cyanohydrin (ACNH) and recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit for this substance. Attention is given to: identity, physical and chemical properties, monitoring; sources of exposure; environmental levels and human exposure; guidelines and standards; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, short-term toxicity, long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproduction toxicity); previous evaluations by national and international bodies; evaluation of human health risk. Based on the data available the committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit for acetone cyanohydrin of 3.5mg/m3 (1ppm) as an eight-hour TWA. For short-term exposure a fifteen minute health-based occupational exposure limit of 35mg/m3 (10ppm) is recommended. A skin-notation is recommended. Summary in Dutch. (66405)

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CIS 96-895 1,1,1-Trichloroethane: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1995. 62p. 44 ref., ISBN 90-5549-084-9 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0895.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the consequences of occupational exposure to 1,1,1-trichloroethane and recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit. The report is an update of the committee's report on the same substance that was published in 1981 (RA 3/81). Attention is given to: existing guidelines, standards and evaluations; biological limit values; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, subchronic toxicity, chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproduction toxicity); evaluation of human health risk. Based on the data available the committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit for 1,1,1-trichloroethane of 555mg/m3 (100ppm, 8 hours TWA). A biological exposure limit based on the 1,1,1-trichloroethane concentration in urine of 235µg/L urine is recommended. However, this BAT value should be interpreted with caution and be used as an indication only, as corroboration (and validation) is needed. Summary in Dutch. (66406)

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CIS 96-896 1- and 2-Propanol: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1994. 117p. approx. 160 ref., ISBN 90-5549-061-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0896.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the effects of exposure to 1-propanol and 2-propanol (isopropyl alcohol). Attention is given to: identity, physical and chemical properties, monitoring; sources of exposure; environmental levels and human exposure; guidelines and standards; toxicokinetics; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproduction toxicity, irritation and sensitization); previous evaluations by (inter)national bodies; evaluation of human health risk. The committee concludes that it cannot recommend a health-based occupational exposure limit for 1-propanol based on the available data. Based on an animal study in which no effects were observed at a concentration of 1925mg/m3 (770ppm) the committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit of 650mg/m3 (250ppm) for 2-propanol, to be averaged over an 8-hour working day (8h TWA). Summary in Dutch. (66407)

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CIS 96-897 Methyl-t-butylether: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1994. 75p. 34 ref., ISBN 90-5549-062-8 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0897.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the effects of exposure to methyl-t-butylether (MTBE). Attention is given to: identity, physical and chemical properties, monitoring; sources of exposure; environmental levels and human exposure; guidelines and standards; toxicokinetics; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproduction toxicity, irritation and sensitization); previous evaluations by (inter)national bodies; evaluation of human health risk. The assessment of health risk of occupational exposure to MTBE is difficult because of the limited human data available and the lack of long-term animal exposure studies. Three organ systems are found to be a target in exposure by inhalation: the upper respiratory tract, the central nervous system and the liver. Based on the data available the Committee recommends a health-based occupational exposure limit for MTBE of 180mg/m3 (50ppm), to be averaged over an 8-hour working day (8h TWA). Also, a short term exposure limit of 360mg/m3 (100ppm), 15min TWA is recommended. Summary in Dutch. (66408)

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CIS 96-898 Methyl chloride: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1995. 70p. 3 ref., ISBN 90-5549-082-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0898.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the effects of exposure to methyl chloride (chloromethane). The committee has worked closely with the Nordic Expert Group, a body which advises the governments of the Scandinavian countries. The joint report of the health implications of exposure to methyl chloride published in Sweden in 1992 is included in its entirety in Part 2 of this document (Arbete och hälsa 1992:27, see also CIS 93-2003). In part 1, various other data are discussed; based on the data available a health-based occupational exposure limit is recommended of 52mg/m3 (25ppm), averaged over an eight-hour working day (8h TWA). Summary in Dutch. (66409)

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CIS 96-899 1,2,3-Trichloropropane: Health based recommended occupational exposure limit. Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards (Werkgroep van Deskundigen ter Vaststelling van MAC-waarden), Gezondheidsraad, Postbus 90517, 2509 LM Den Haag, Netherlands, 1994. 91p. 88 ref., ISBN 90-5549-065-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0899.pdf

In this report the Dutch Committee on Occupational Standards discusses the effects of exposure to 1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TriCP) and presents a risk estimate of the chance of cancer on exposure to the substance. Attention is given to: identity, physical and chemical properties, monitoring; sources of exposure; environmental levels and human exposure; guidelines and standards; toxicokinetics; effects in animals and man (acute toxicity, long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproduction toxicity); previous evaluations by (inter)national bodies; evaluation of human health risk. The committee uses linear extrapolation to calculate the additional risk of tumour development. It takes as starting point a study in which rats were exposed orally to 1,2,3-TriCP. Based on the tumour incidence in the lowest dose group and using linear extrapolation, a life-long risk for exposure at work was estimated. An additional incidence of tumours can be expected: 0.00004 at a 1,2,3-TriCP concentration of 1.08µg/m3 (0.18ppb), and 0.004 at a 1,2,3-TriCP concentration of 108µg/m3 (17.7ppb). The committee recommends a skin notation. Summary in Dutch. (66410)

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CIS 96-900 Proposals for amendments to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1994 and the Approved Code of Practice: Control of substances hazardous to health (General ACOP). Health and Safety Commission, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Mar. 1996. 117p. Bibl.ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0900.pdf

This consultative document sets out proposals by the Health and Safety Commission for amendments to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) 1994 (see CIS 95-19) and to the supporting Approved Code of Practice. The main proposals relate to 18 new and revised maximum exposure limits (MELs). A cost benefit assessment methodology for these proposals is presented along with toxicity data and proposed MELs for each substance. Other proposals relate to presentational changes, updating cross-references to COSHH in other regulations, and consequential amendments to the General ACoP. Comments on the proposals are invited. (66450)

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CIS 96-901 Existing chemicals of environmental relevance III - Priority setting and classified existing chemicals of the third priority list. Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1996. 119p. Price: DEM 72.00., ISBN 3-7776-0689-8 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0901.pdf

This document, translation of a report finalized in June 1992, describes the German Chemical Society's procedure for the classification and priority setting of existing chemicals requiring toxicity evaluation and presents summary toxicity data for some 130 substances in the third priority list. The substances are arranged in four chemical groups: sulfonic acid compounds, phosphoric acid esters, acrylic acid and acrylic acid esters (acrylates), and methacrylic acid and methacrylic acid esters (methacrylates). Data relate to acute toxicity, irritation, sensitization, repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. (66461)

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CIS 96-902 Monochloroacetic acid, sodium monochloroacetate. Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1996. xiii, 125p. Bibl.ref. Price: DEM 72.00., ISBN 3-7776-0705-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0902.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in August 1993: monochloroacetic acid causes irritation, burning (with blister formation) and corrosion on contact with human skin; similar damage is to be expected on contact with the eyes. The substance is rapidly absorbed through the skin and, if a sufficiently large area of the skin is contaminated, can lead to breathing difficulties, convulsions, vomiting, shock and death. (66462)

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CIS 96-903 Supplementary reports II - m-Dichlorobenzene; Bromomethane; 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene; N,N-Diethylaniline; Styrene; Biphenyl; o/m-Chloroaniline; Nitrobenzene. Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1996. xxiv, 157p. Bibl.ref., ISBN 3-7776-0706-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0903.pdf

This document comprises translations of supplementary reports, finalized between June 1993 and April 1994, relating to eight substances evaluated in earlier BUA reports. The new data relate mainly to the results of animal studies carried out following recommendations in the original reports. No human effects are reported. (66463)

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CIS 96-904 The assessment of respiratory and dermal exposure to pesticides: A review of current practice. Findlay A., National Occupational Health and Safety Commission (Worksafe Australia), Australian Government Publishing Service, GPO Box 84, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia, Oct. 1995. xiii, 67p. Illus. 126 ref., ISBN 0-642-23521-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0904.pdf

This literature survey reviews current pesticide application technology and methods for the assessment of respiratory and dermal exposures. Contents: properties and behaviour of airborne particulates; particulates generated by different methods of pesticide application; particulates generated during harvesting; factors likely to increase the inhalation hazard; sampling of airborne particulate matter; assessment of dermal exposure to pesticides; the process of skin absorption; assessing dermal exposure. (66480)

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CIS 96-905 Dichloromethane. Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1993. xiv, 82p. 334 ref., ISBN 3-527-28559-8 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0905.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in November 1986: the main effects of acute exposure to dichloromethane in humans are central nervous system depression and an increase in the carboxyhaemoglobin level in the blood; these affects are reversible. Chronic exposure also causes central nervous system depression. Carcinogenic effects have been observed in experimental animals, but there is no indication of carcinogenicity in humans. (66521)

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CIS 96-906 Chloromethane. Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1993. xiv, 55p. 177 ref., ISBN 3-527-28558-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0906.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in November 1986: chloromethane causes depression of the central nervous system; in higher concentrations it can also affect the liver, kidneys, heart and the haemopoietic system. Numerous cases of poisoning due to chloromethane have been described. A small cohort study among chloromethane-exposed workers at a rubber factory gave no indication of an increased tumour rate. (66522)

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CIS 96-907 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene. Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany 1993. xii, 90p. 200 ref., ISBN 3-527-28557-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0907.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in December 1987: 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene has a low acute toxicity. Very little data is available on the effects of the substance in humans. Mild irritation of the skin, eyes and respiratory tract has been reported. (66523)

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CIS 96-908 3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine (3,3'-dichloro-biphenyl-4,4'-diyldiamine). Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1993. xiii, 79p. 179 ref., ISBN 3-527-28590-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0908.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in March 1989: dermal absorption is the principal route of uptake of 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine; occupational exposure has been monitored by determination of the substance in urine. Most frequent health effects include gastrointestinal problems, infections of the upper respiratory tract, caustic burns and allergic dermatitis. While genotoxic and carcinogenic effects have been observed in animals, epidemiological studies have so far provided no firm evidence of a carcinogenic effect in humans; the substance is classified as one which may cause cancer. (66524)

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CIS 96-909 Benzenedicarbonitriles. Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1993. xii, 38p. 44 ref., ISBN 3-527-28606-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0909.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in December 1988: the main effects of phthalodinitrile (o-PDN) are on the central nervous system. The isomers isophthalodinitrile (m-PDN) and terephthalodinitrile (p-PDN) appear to be less toxic than o-PDN. Cases of acute human intoxication have been reported following dust inhalation and skin absorption; symptoms may be delayed for up to 48 hours after exposure. Reported effects include skin and mucous membrane irritation, nausea, unconsciousness and epileptoid convulsions. (66525)

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CIS 96-910 Triethyl phosphate (phosphoric acid triethyl ester). Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1993. xii, 60p. 106 ref., ISBN 3-527-28555-5 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0910.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in March 1989: no data are available on the effects of triethyl phosphate in humans. Animal studies indicate that the substance has a low acute toxicity; at high doses it affects mainly the central nervous system. The substance may cause eye irritation. (66526)

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CIS 96-911 N,N-Diethylaniline (N,N-diethylaminobenzene). Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1993. xi, 40p. 56 ref., ISBN 3-527-28556-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0911.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in October 1989: no data are available on the effects of N,N-diethylaniline in humans. Animal studies indicate that it is a strong methaemoglobin-forming agent, with cyanosis being the predominant symptom of acute poisoning. It is a slight skin irritant. (66527)

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CIS 96-912 Nitrotoluenes (methylnitrobenzenes). Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1993. xv, 104p. 146 ref., ISBN 3-527-28591-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0912.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in April 1989: no reliable data are available on the effects of nitrotoluenes in humans; there are some reports of poisoning among workers exposed to mixtures of nitrotoluenes and other substances. Animal studies indicate that nitrotoluenes have a low level of acute toxicity; main effects are methaemoglobin formation and central nervous system depression. No reliable data are available on mutagenic or carcinogenic effects. (66528)

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CIS 96-913 Styrene (ethenylbenzene). Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh) - Advisory Committee on Existing Chemicals of Environmental Relevance (BUA), S. Hirzel Verlag, P.O. Box 10 10 61, 70009 Stuttgart, Germany, 1993. xvii, 161p. 288 ref., ISBN 3-527-28608-x (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0913.pdf

Conclusions of this criteria document, translation of a report finalized in March 1980: the main effects of styrene reported in humans are irritation of the mucous membranes and disorders of the central nervous system. Styrene is metabolized to styrene-7,8-oxide, which has proved to be mutagenic and carcinogenic both in vitro and in animal experiments. Studies of industrial workers exposed to mixtures including styrene have revealed an increased incidence of leukaemia and lymphomas. (66529)

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CIS 96-914 Cancer and workplace chemicals. Duffus J.H., H and H Scientific Consultants Ltd, P.O. Box MT27, Leeds LS17 8QP, United Kingdom, 1995. v, 75p. 69 ref. Index. Price: GBP 18.00., ISBN 0-948237-26-0 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0914.pdf

This handbook reviews current thinking relating to the role of workplace chemicals in causing cancer and the regulation and control of known carcinogens. Contents: list of established human carcinogens and their target organs; list of industrial processes classified as carcinogenic in humans; carcinogenesis; identification and classification of carcinogens; assessment of carcinogenic potency. In annexes: United Kingdom and European legislation; list of substances which may be carcinogenic in humans. Glossary. (66663)

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CIS 96-915 Surface and dermal monitoring for toxic exposures. Ness S.A., Van Nostrand Reinhold, 115 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003, USA, 1994. x, 561p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 52.50., ISBN 0-442-01465-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0915.pdf

This manual is in three parts. Part I - chemical hazards: identifying chemicals as hazards; factors affecting chemical permeation; chemical protective clothing. Part II - developing strategies for sampling: assessment of workplace exposures and community exposures. Part III - surface monitoring: surface sampling for chemicals, microorganisms and low level radiation; decontamination. Part IV - dermal sampling techniques: skin sampling; pad dosimetry methods; clothing for dosimetry and protection. In appendices: monitoring of amines, metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, tetrachlorodibenzodioxins and pesticides. (66674)

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CIS 96-916 Review of exposure to carcinogenic substances at the workplace. (German: Zur Expositionssituation krebserzeugender Gefahrstoffe am Arbeitsplatz) Bock W., Breuer D., Hahn J.U., Kleine H., Pfeiffer W., Pflaumbaum W., Stückrath M., Blome H., Berufsgenossenschaftliches Institut für Arbeitssicherheit, Hauptverband der gewerblichen Berufsgenossenschaften, Alte Heerstasse 111, 53754 Sankt Augustin, Germany, 1996. 68p. Illus. 14 ref., ISBN 3-88383-397-5 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0916.pdf

Exposure concentrations were determined for 16 carcinogenic substances in 3,576 industrial enterprises in Germany between 1989-1992. On this basis three groups of substances could be established with respect to exposure levels: 1 - no measurement exceeded the exposure limit (1,3-butadiene, 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane, acrylonitrile and chloroethylene); 2 - 90% of the measurements were below the exposure limit (arsenic compounds, benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, chromium VI compounds, diantimony trioxide, nickel and its compounds); 3 - 50% of the measurements were below the limit (all other substances analyzed). There has been a significant reduction in exposure levels since the period 1981-84. Detailed summary in German, English, French and Spanish. (66687)

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CIS 96-917 Acid anhydrides - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Ridgway P., Morris L., Ogunbiyi A.O., Brown R.H., Cocker J., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 73p. 160 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1059-4 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0917.pdf

Main conclusions of this criteria document: phthalic, trimellitic and maleic anhydride are all irritating to the skin, eyes and respiratory tract. Phthalic anhydride may cause skin sensitization, asthma and rhinitis in some exposed individuals. Clinical syndromes associated with exposure to trimellitic anhydride dust or fume include asthma and rhinitis, late onset respiratory system syndrome, and a pulmonary disease/anaemia syndrome; late asthma and late arthralgia-myalgia may also occur. Maleic anhydride may cause asthma. Proposed maximum exposure limits: phthalic anhydride 4mg.m-3 (8h TWA), 12mg.m-3 (15min reference period); trimellitic anhydride 0.04mg.m-3 (8h TWA), 0.12mg.m-3 (15min reference period); maleic anhydride 1mg.m-3 (8h TWA), 3mg.m-3 (15min reference period). (66783)

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CIS 96-918 Antimony and antimony compounds - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Ball E., Smith A., Northage C., Smith M.M., Bradley S.D., Gillies C., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 63p. 81 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1054-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0918.pdf

Main conclusions of this criteria document: antimony (III) oxide is known to cause skin lesions in exposed workers; cases of skin sensitization have been reported. On the basis of animal studies and physico-chemical characteristics, it is expected that the chlorides will be corrosive on contact with the skin or eyes. Investigations among antimony-exposed workers are inadequate, although several studies have reported respiratory tract inflammation and pneumoconiosis. Other effects include conjunctivitis, and gastrointestinal disturbances. Antimony metal and antimony compounds are known to be carcinogenic in experimental animals. Proposed maximum exposure limit: 0.5mg.m-3 (8h TWA). (66784)

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CIS 96-919 Azodicarbonamide - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Ball E.M., Saleem A., Oogunbiyi A.O., Wiley K., Groves J.A., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 34p. 41 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1092-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0919.pdf

Main conclusions of this criteria document: the health effects of azodicarbonamide in humans have not been fully evaluated. The most frequently reported effects of repeated exposure are respiratory symptoms. There is evidence that the compound can cause both respiratory and skin sensitization in humans. There are no reports of other systemic effects. Proposed maximum exposure limit: 1.0mg.m-3 (8h TWA); 3.0mg.m-3 (15min reference period). Notation: sensitizer. (66785)

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CIS 96-920 Hydrazine - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Brooke I., Cain J., Topping M., Groves J., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 57p. 139 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1099-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0920.pdf

Main conclusions of this criteria document: exposure to hydrazine, even for short periods, can have local irritant and severe systemic effects. Inhalation of the vapour affects the nervous system; drinking small amounts of hydrazine solution rapidly damages the nervous system, liver and kidneys. The substance causes irritation of the skin, eyes and respiratory tract and is a skin sensitizer. Little information is available on the effects of repeated exposure. The carcinogenic potential has not been adequately investigated. Proposed maximum exposure limit: 0.02ppm (8h TWA). Notation: skin. (66786)

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CIS 96-921 Platinum metal and soluble platinum salts - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Meldrum M., Northage C., Howe A., Gillies C., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 41p. 89 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1055-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0921.pdf

Main conclusions of this criteria document: no data are available on the potential human health effects arising from exposure to platinum metal. There is clear evidence that exposure to platinum chloride salts leads to skin and respiratory sensitization. Symptoms include scaly erythematous dermatitis on the hands, face and neck, conjunctivitis, rhinitis and cyanosis; some individuals have shown extreme sensitivity. Proposed maximum exposure limit: 0.002mg.m-3 (8h TWA). (66787)

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CIS 96-922 Propylene oxide - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. James D., Cain J., White J., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 38p. 83 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1056-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0922.pdf

Main conclusions of this criteria document: there is evidence that propylene oxide can produce severe eye irritation and skin sensitization in humans. No other conclusions can be drawn regarding toxicity, mutagenicity or carcinogenicity. Proposed maximum exposure limit: 5ppm (8h TWA). (66788)

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CIS 96-923 NIOSH Alert - Request for assistance in preventing asthma and death from diisocyanate exposure. Publications Dissemination, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA, Mar. 1996. 13p. 33 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0923.pdf

This data sheet describes the health effects of diisocyanates (irritation, sensitization and asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, cancer) and current exposure limits. Seven case reports of disease and death following occupational exposure to diisocyanates are presented. Recommendations to reduce worker exposure include product substitution, closed systems and ventilation, worker isolation, protective clothing and equipment, respiratory protection, worker and employer education, and exposure monitoring. (66810)

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CIS 96-924 Simple toxicological laboratory methods in cases of acute poisoning. (German: Einfache toxikologische Laboratoriumsuntersuchungen bei akuten Vergiftung) Gibitz H.J., Schütz H., DFG Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, eds., VCH Verlagsgesellschaft mbH, 69451 Weinheim, Germany, 1995. xxviii, 553p. Illus. approx. 500 ref. Index. Price: DEM 172.00., ISBN 3-527-27562-2 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0924.pdf

Simple, rapid methods for identifying the substance and amount involved in cases of acute poisoning are described. Methods which determine the effects of poisons, for example on the activity of the enzyme cholinesterase, are included. Most substances implicated in accidental or suicidal poisonings, such as antihistamines, analgesics, tranquillizers, stimulants, salicylates, hydrocyanic acid, iron, thallium and ethanol, are covered. (66907)

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CIS 96-925 IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans - Printing processes and printing inks, carbon black and some nitro compounds. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), IARC Press, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69732 Lyon Cedex 08, France, 1996. v, 578p. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: CHF 90.00., ISBN 92-832-1265-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0925.pdf

This monograph presents the views and expert opinions of an IARC Working Group which met in Lyon, France, 10-17 October 1995. Overall evaluation: occupational exposures in printing processes, carbon black, 3,7-dinitrofluoranthene, 3,9-dinitrofluoranthene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitroanisole, nitrobenzene and tetranitromethane are possibly carcinogenic in humans (Group 2B); printing inks, chloronitrobenzenes, 3,5-dinitrotoluene, musk ambrette, musk xylene, nitrotoluenes and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene are not classifiable as to their carcinogenicity in humans (Group 3). (66933)

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CIS 96-926 Safe handling of cytostatic drugs - Criteria document: Working papers for safety at work specialists. (French: Sécurité dans la manipulation des cytostatiques. Documentation de base: documents de travail destinés aux fonctionnels de sécurité; German: Sicherer Umgang mit Zytostatika. Grunddokumentation: Arbeitspapier für Spezialisten der Arbeitssicherheit) Ahrens R., Beaudoin L., Eickmann U., Falcy M., Jost M., Rüegger M., International Social Security Association (ISSA), Internationale Sektion für die Verhütung von Arbeitsunfällen und Berufskrankheiten im Gesundheitswesen (IVSS-Sektion Gesundheitswesen), Pappelallee 35/37, 22089 Hamburg, Germany, 1996. 93p. 23 ref., ISBN 92-843-2100-X (fr), ISBN 92-843-7100-7 (deu) (In French, German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-0926de.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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Consensus document produced by a working group that studied the hazards related to the use of cytostatic drugs (anaesthetics, disinfectants and aerosoltherapy agents, with particular attention to pentamidine and ribavirine). (66681)

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CIS 96-927 Introduction to respiratory protection. (German: Grundlagen des Atemschutzes) Eulenburg P.R., W. Kohlhammer Druckerei GmbH & Co., 70549 Stuttgart, Germany, 1995. 158p. Illus. 30 ref. Index. Price: DEM 38.00., ISBN 3-17-013070-6 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0927.pdf

Contents of this introduction to respiratory protection: physiology of the respiratory system; toxic substances; respiratory protection in general (including standards for respiratory equipment EN 133 and for masks EN 136); filter and self-contained breathing apparatus; when should respiratory protection equipment be used; training of users; maintenance and care. (66903)

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CIS 96-928 Benzene. Department of the Environment, Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards, HMSO Books, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1994. vii, 20p. 17 ref. Price: GBP 5.95., ISBN 0-11-752859-5 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0928.pdf

This booklet briefly discusses the sources of exposure to benzene, methods of monitoring atmospheric concentrations, and evidence for its harmful effects on health, with particular attention paid to leukaemia. The recommended Air Quality Standard for benzene in the United Kingdom is 5ppb as a running annual average. (66931)

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CIS 96-929 Ullmann's encyclopedia of industrial chemistry. Vol.B8. Environmental protection and industrial safety II. VCH Verlagsgesellschaft mbH, P.O. Box 10 11 61, 69451 Weinheim, Germany, rev.ed., 1995. xv, 770p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Price: DEM 625.00., ISBN 3-527-20138-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0929.pdf

Continuation of the collection abstracted under CIS 93-953, 95-265, 95-693 and 96-297. Contents of this volume: wastewater treatment; raw materials and energy; products (toxicological properties, classification schemes, risk assessment and management); production-integrated environmental protection; plant and process safety (safety problems, hazardous substances, design and construction of safe plants, safe plant operation, hazard control); occupational health and safety (legal requirements, safety and health organization, occupational medicine); transport, handling and storage (dangerous goods, regulations and standards, packaging, bulk transport, pipelines); waste management. (66770)

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CIS 96-930 Center for Chemical Process Safety - 1994 Annual report. Center for Chemical Process Safety, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 345 East 47th Street, New York, New York 10017-2395, USA, 1995. 24p. Illus. ### (In English)

Description of the 12 elements of the CCPS process safety management system, and of the publications and activities intended to help enterprises implement the system. (66989)

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CIS 96-931 Safety in laboratories - From risk analysis to operating procedures. (French: La sécurité dans les laboratoires - De l'analyse des risques aux règles d'exploitation) Guibert J., AFNOR, La Médiathèque du Risque, 5, rue Daunou, 75002 Paris, France, 2nd ed., 1993. 274p. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: FRF 400.00. ### (In French)

Main contents of this document on safety in laboratories: terminology; risk types; design, layout, equipment; specific measures; ventilation; compressed/liquefied gases; supplies; residues; hazard labels; organization; equipment use; handling of chemical substances; involvement of outside personnel; incidents, accidents; operating and layout changes; terminology; regulatory texts and standards; dangers associated with chemical substances. (67027)

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CIS 96-932 Substitute fibres for asbestos: General considerations. (Spanish: Las fibras alternativas al amianto: consideraciones generales) Freixa Blanxart A., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 6p. 7 ref. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0932.pdf

This information note presents criteria for the selection of asbestos substitute fibres, taking into account their health hazards. Subjects covered are: types of substitute materials, availability; advantages and disadvantages; health hazards, in particular carcinogenicity. (66716)

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CIS 96-933 Softwood dust - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Minty C., Saleem A., Wagg R., Gillies C., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 28p. 77 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1087-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0933.pdf

There is good evidence that occupational exposure to dust from cedars and redwoods is associated with the development of work-related asthma. Since immunological and/or pharmacological effects are involved, these dusts are considered to have the potential to be respiratory sensitizers. Alveolitis, fibrosis and allergic contact dermatitis have also been observed in woodworkers exposed softwood dusts. There is evidence that exposure to these dusts has produced an increased incidence of sinonasal cancer (predominantly squamous cell carcinomas). Proposed maximum exposure limit: 5mg.m-3 8-hour TWA (total inhalable dust). Notation: sensitizer. (66795)

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CIS 96-934 Anaesthetic agents - Controlling exposure under COSHH. Health and Safety Commission, Health Services Advisory Committee, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. v, 17p. Illus. 15 ref. Price: GBP 6.50., ISBN 0-7176-1043-8 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0934.pdf

This document provides guidance on compliance with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 1994 (see CIS 95-19) and with Occupational Exposure Standards for four anaesthetic agents: nitrous oxide, halothane, enflurane and isoflurane. Contents: effects of exposure to anaesthetic agents; key aspects of the COSHH Regulations (risk assessment, exposure measurement, implementation, use and maintenance of control measures, exposure monitoring, air sampling, health surveillance, personnel training); recommended control measures for general anaesthesia (gas scavenging, ventilation), paediatric anaesthesia and inhalation analgesia in obstetrics and dentistry. (66298)

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CIS 96-935 1,3-Butadiene. Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards, HMSO Publications Centre, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1994. vii, 24p. Illus. 16 ref. Price: GBP 5.95., ISBN 0-11-753034-4 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0935.pdf

1,3-Butadiene is a substance that is a gas at normal ambient temperatures. Trace amounts, mostly derived from the combustion of petroleum and other fuels, can be found in the atmosphere. In industry, it is used in the production of synthetic rubber and is also present in some liquid petroleum gases. There is some epidemiological evidence that workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene have a slightly higher than expected risk of developing certain cancers (lymphoid system, bone marrow, lymphomas, leukaemias). Its genotoxic and carcinogenic effects have also been shown in animal experiments. After reviewing measurement methods and the evidence for health risks, this document recommends an Air Quality Standard of 1ppb as a running annual average for 1,3-butadiene, a level not normally exceeded in urban air in the United Kingdom. (66384)

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CIS 96-936 Carbon monoxide. Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards, HMSO Publications Centre, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1994. vii, 23p. Illus. 11 ref. Price: GBP 5.95., ISBN 0-11-753035-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0936.pdf

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas produced by the incomplete combustion of organic substances (e.g. in automobile engines). It is highly toxic, as it interferes with the transport of oxygen by red blood cells. Its lethal nature is enhanced by the fact that it is both colourless and odourless, and the first sign of severe poisoning is loss of consciousness. Fatal consequences of exposure to CO are, however, restricted to people exposed to very high concentrations (generally in confined atmospheres). The main risk of exposure to CO at low concentrations indoors, or in an outdoors environment, is an increased risk of health problems in persons with ischaemic heart disease. After reviewing measurement methods and the evidence for health risks, this document recommends an Air Quality Standard of 10ppm as a running 8h average for CO, a level rarely exceeded in urban air in the United Kingdom (8h average levels of up to 15.8ppm, and max. 1h levels of up to 18.7ppm, have been measured in London, but the 10ppm level is not normally exceeded more than 5 days per year). (66385)

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CIS 96-937 Sulphur dioxide. Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards, HMSO Publications Centre, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1995. vii, 27p. Illus. 13 ref. Price: GBP 5.95., ISBN 0-11-753135-9 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0937.pdf

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is an irritant gas under normal atmospheric conditions. It dissolves in water to produce an acidic solution which is readily oxidized to sulfuric acid. Though SO2 in the atmosphere has some natural sources (volcanic activity and metabolic release by marine organisms), its principal sources are from the combustion of sulfur-containing fossil fuels (coal and heavy oils). The main hazards of exposure to SO2 are breathing difficulties, with particularly serious consequences in asthma sufferers. After reviewing measurement methods and the evidence for health risks, this document recommends an Air Quality Standard of 100ppb (measured over a 15min averaging period) for SO2, a level often exceeded in urban air in the United Kingdom (max. level recorded in 1993: 614ppb). (66386)

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CIS 96-938 Mercury and its inorganic divalent compounds. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, Mar. 1996. 6p. 21 ref. Price: GBP 4.00., ISBN 0-7176-1127-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0938.pdf

Contents of this guidance note: occurrence, properties and use of mercury and its inorganic divalent compounds; effects on health following inhalation or skin contact (neurotoxic effects, kidney damage, irritation of the eyes, skin and respiratory tract, allergic skin reactions); risk assessment; prevention and control of exposure (substitution, engineering controls, work planning and housekeeping, personal protective equipment, skin protection, respiratory protection); maintenance, examination and testing of control measures; monitoring exposure; health surveillance; information and training; emergency procedures. (66446)

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CIS 96-939 Guidelines for the evaluation of chemicals for carcinogenicity. Department of Health, Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment, HMSO Books, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, United Kingdom, 1991. x, 80p. Bibl.ref. Price: GBP 7.30., ISBN 0-11-321453-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0939.pdf

Contents of these guidelines: general issues in chemical carcinogenesis; epidemiologic studies in the assessment of cancer risk; major classes of carcinogenic chemicals and the mechanisms by which they exert their carcinogenic effects; use of short-term predictive tests for screening the carcinogenic potential of chemicals; design of carcinogenicity tests; interpretation of carcinogenicity studies; assessment of the hazards and risks from exposure to chemical carcinogens. Glossary. (66664)

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CIS 96-940 Nitric oxide. (French: Monoxyde d'azote) Baud F.J., Levy D., Geye P.N., Encyclopédie médico-chirurgicale, Toxicologie-Pathologie professionnelle, 1st Quarter 1996, No.110. 8p. 56 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0940.pdf

Nitric oxide (NO) is a potentially toxic, reactive compound. Its acute toxicity is essentially due to its dose-dependent induction of methaemoglobinaemia, leading to a reduction in oxygen transport by blood and the consequent reduction in oxygen uptake by tissues. In the case of chronic exposure, NO induces haemolysis. After NO exposure, short-term hyperleucocytosis in mice was noted in several experiments. There is evidence for the mutagenicity, but not the carcinogenicity, of NO. Exposure limits: in the US, 25ppm for 8h TWA; ceiling value for NO2 is 5ppm (9mg/m3). In France, the 8h TWA exposure limit for NO is also 25ppm (30mg/m3), while for NO2 it is 3ppm (6mg/m3). (66760)

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CIS 96-941 Handbook of pharmaceutical additives. Ash M., Ash I., eds., Gower Publishing Ltd., Gower House, Croft Road, Aldershot, Hampshire GU11 3HR, United Kingdom, 1995. xiv, 1118p. 41 ref. Price: GBP 225.00., ISBN 0-566-07596-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0941.pdf

This handbook describes approximately 3,600 trade name products and 2,500 pharmaceutical additives. Part I contains an alphabetical listing of trade name pharmaceutical additives and Part II an alphabetical listing of pharmaceutical chemicals with cross-references to part I where applicable. Information is provided on manufacturer, chemical composition, synonyms, identity numbers, properties, functions and applications, toxicology, precautions, usage levels and regulatory information. Part III contains an alphabetical listing by functional category and Part IV is a directory of manufacturers. Numerous cross-references are provided. Also available in electronic format. (66791)

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CIS 96-942 Ortho-toluidine - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Gregg N., South D., Brown R., Cocker J., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 45p. Illus. 168 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1057-8 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0942.pdf

With the exception of carcinogenicity studies, little useful information is available on the effects of single or repeated exposure to o-toluidine in humans. Exposure to mixtures of chemicals including o-toluidine in the dyestuff and rubber industries appears to be associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer. However, it is not possible to link this observation specifically to o-toluidine. Proposed limit: 0.2ppm (0.89mg.m-3) 8-hour TWA. Notation: skin. (66794)

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CIS 96-943 Iodomethane - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Davies C., Cain J.R., Evans S., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 19p. 37 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1052-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0943.pdf

Very little data is available on the effects of iodomethane in humans. Reported health effects following repeated exposure include headache and nausea with neurological and psychological abnormalities. There is no information on mutagenicity, carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity of iodomethane in humans. Proposed maximum exposure limit: 2ppm (8-hour TWA). Notation: skin. (66796)

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CIS 96-944 Dimethyl and diethyl sulphates - Criteria document for an occupational exposure limit. Cartlidge G., Cain J., Brown R.H., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 31p. 59 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1058-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0944.pdf

Inhalation of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) causes irritation of the mucosal linings of the eyes, nose, mouth and upper respiratory tract along with dizziness and headache. Dermal exposure to undiluted DMS causes skin burns after a latent period. Similar, though less severe, acute effects may be anticipated from exposure to diethyl sulfate (DES). Animal studies suggest that both DMS and DES should be regarded as potential human mutagens/carcinogens. Proposed maximum exposure limit for both substances: 0.05ppm (8-hour TWA). Notation: skin. (66797)

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CIS 96-945 The manager's guide to control of hazardous substances. British Occupational Hygiene Society, H and H Scientific Consultants Ltd, P.O. Box MT27, Leeds LS17 8QP, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 58p. Illus. 20 ref. Index. Price: GBP 14.00 UK; GBP 17.00, USD 34.00, CAD 40.00 overseas., ISBN 0-948237-28-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0945.pdf

Contents of this guide: legal requirements for the control of hazardous substances and compliance with exposure limits; choice of control measures; prevention of exposure (elimination, substitution); controlling exposure (containment, ventilation for removal at source, controlling the spread of the contaminant, control of access, control of skin exposure and ingestion); personal protective equipment (respirators, protective clothing); safety during maintenance, repair and emergencies; monitoring of control measures; information of personnel. Includes 21 case studies providing solutions to various exposure problems. (66800)

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CIS 96-946 Threshold limit values for chemicals in the workplace. (Italian: Valori limite di esposizione ad agenti chimici negli ambienti di lavoro) Maroni M., Prevenzione oggi, July-Sep. 1992, Vol.4, No.3, p.39-73. 69 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0946.pdf

Data sheets and toxicological profiles are presented for benzene, pentachlorophenol, arsenic, vanadium, tetraethyllead, tetramethyllead, xylene, toluene and cadmium. The information includes teratogenicity, mutagenicity, carcinogenic effects and threshold limit values (including those for the US and Italy) taken from the reviewed literature. (66919)

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CIS 96-947 Determination of toxicity of a gas or gas mixture. (French: Détermination de la toxicité d'un gaz ou d'un mélange de gaz) International Organization for Standardization, Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1995. iv, 17p. Illus. 43 ref. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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This International Standard specifies a test method to determine whether or not a gas is toxic or very toxic, in order to eliminate difficulties involved in the application of ISO 5146. A calculation method is given to enable the toxicity of gas mixtures to be determined in the absence of valid experimental data. Main contents: definitions; determination of toxicity. Annexes: LC50 values for different groups of gases (non-flammable, toxic, corrosive, non-corrosive, spontaneously flammable, oxidant, subject to decomposition or polymerization, etc.); testing guidelines; selection of an LC50 value for a particular gas. (66965)

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CIS 96-948 Weed control manual. Foster R., Knake E., McCarty R.H., Mortvedt J.J., eds., Meister Publishing Company, 37733 Euclid Avenue, Willoughby, OH 44094-5992, USA, 30th ed., 1996. 538p. Illus. Indexes. Price: USD 54.00. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0948.pdf

The main part of this manual consists of a directory of herbicides commercially available in the US, with guidance on their use, toxicity and protective clothing requirements. Products are arranged by crop to be protected: field corn, soybeans, cotton, small grains, other field crops, vegetables, fruits and nuts, lawns and turf, and aquatic uses. An introductory section provides an overview of weed identification and management, types of pesticide formulations available, environmental aspects and regulatory compliance. (66372)

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CIS 96-949 Diesel engine pollution during tunnel construction - Bulletin 2. Particle filters. (Dutch: Abgasschadstoffe von Dieselmotoren im Tunnelbau: Bulletin 2. Dieselpartikelfilter; French: Pollution par les moteurs diesel lors de la construction de tunnels - Bulletin 2. Filtres à particules; Italian: Gas inquinanti dei motori Diesel nella costruzione di gallerie: Bolletino 2. Filtro per particelle) Allgemeine Unfallversicherungsanstalt (AUVA); Schweizerische Unfallversicherungsanstalt (SUVA); Tiefbau-Berufsgenossenschaft (TBG), VERT, Schweizerische Unfallvericherungsanstalt, Kundendienst, Postfach, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, Dec. 1995. 8p. Illus. 12 ref. (In Dutch, French, German, Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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This information note describes the particle filters that constitute the only equipment capable of reducing the concentration of diesel particles to a level below 0.2mg/m3 of air. Five such filters were selected and tested on two machine engines as part of project VERT jointly conducted by AUVA in Austria, SUVA in Switzerland and TBG in Germany. The filtration efficiency of all the filters was >90%, with pressure losses and costs at an acceptable level. The size of most of the filters will also make them suitable for eventual use. Once installed on construction sites, these filters will be subject to regular tests as to their filtration efficiency and periodic cleaning. (66338)

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CIS 96-950 Recommendations on the safe use of pesticides in ships. (Portuguese: Recomendações sobre segurança no uso de pesticidas a bordo dos navios) Direcção-Geral de Portos, Navegação e Transportes Marítimos, Inspecção de Navios e Segurança Marítima, Lisboa, Portugal, 1995. 41p. Illus., ISBN 972-8020-08-2 (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0950.pdf

Contents of this guidance document, translation of a publication by the International Maritime Organization (IMO): prevention of infestation by insects aboard ships; chemical insecticides and their utilization; prevention of infestation by rodents; national and international regulations of the use of pesticides in ships; safety precautions (pesticides; spaces and surfaces where pesticides have been sprayed; fumigation; particular precautions when insecticides are sprayed in cargo and cereal storage areas; exposure to toxic pesticides). In annex: appropriate pesticides for use in ships; TLVs for fumes of certain pesticides; warning sign for fumigation. (66499)

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CIS 96-951 Chemical safety data. University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Internet WWW pages, home-page address: http://cortex.uchc.edu/~safety/ehs/msds-1.html ### (In English)

Guide to Internet resources on chemical safety. Hypertext links are provided throughout. Contents: general chemical safety information (including that available to UCHC registered users only, some in hard copy); links to material safety data sheet (MSDS) databases available to the public; restricted-access MSDS databases available commercially. (67057)

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CIS 96-952 HazDat: ATSDR's Hazardous Substance Release / Health Effects Database. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Internet WWW pages, home-page address: http://atsdr1.atsdr.cdc.gov:8080/hazdat.html#A3.1 ### (In English)

This US database on the Internet is a scientific and administrative database developed to provide access to information on the release of hazardous substances from Superfund sites or from emergency events and on the effects of hazardous substances on human populations. The following information is included for each site (approx. 1300 in 1996): site characteristics; activities and site events; contaminants found; contaminant media and maximum concentration levels; impact on the population; community health concerns; ATSDR public health threat categorization; ATSDR recommendations; environmental fate of hazardous substances; exposure groups; physical hazards at the site/event. Substance-specific information (approx. 150 substances in 1996) is provided on: ATSDR Priority List of Hazardous Substances; health effects by route and duration of exposure; metabolites; substance interactions; susceptible populations; exposure and effect biomarkers. There are also data from the database Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) maintained by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sophisticated relational database search techniques may be used to access information in HazDat. (67059)

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[ Top of page ]

006 Fires, explosions and major hazards

CIS 96-953 Selection and use in the enterprise. Gas detectors. (French: Choix et utilisation en entreprise. Les détecteurs de gaz) Zdanévitch I., Huré P., Travail et sécurité, May 1996, No.548, p.20-31. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0953.pdf

Gas detectors are of great help to both workers and safety specialists in the enterprise, especially for risk assessment at the workplace. This article describes the principles of operation of explosimeters and oxygen level meters, their use in various situations and their maintenance. It also reviews applicable French legislation. (66953)

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CIS 96-954 The concept of safety barriers and their reliability in an oil well operation. (Portuguese: O conceito de barreira de segurança e sua confiabilidade em um poço de petróleo) Takashina N.T., Revista CIPA, Feb. 1996, Vol.17, No.195, p.83-92. Illus. 7 ref. (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0954.pdf

Survey of the theory and practice of safety barriers as they are used in oil exploration, in the operation of oil wells, in drilling operations and in well completion activities. Several fault trees illustrating the use of safety barriers are given. (66495)

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CIS 96-955 Two men in a boat. (French: Deux hommes dans un bachot) Richez J.P., Caisse régionale d'assurance maladie Ile-de-France (CRAMIF), Travail et sécurité, Dec. 1994, No.531, p.837-840. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0955.pdf

Fast rescue is essential for people who fall accidentally into a river. Victims are often injured and/or in shock because of sudden contact with cold water. As such, they are in danger of losing consciousness. In order to be able to save them, it is essential for potential rescue personnel to learn the techniques practised by professional diving personnel. In addition, rescue equipment must be kept up-to-date and in good condition. (66758)

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CIS 96-956 The Hazardous Incidents Ordinance and occupational safety and health - First evaluation of notifiable events for 1993. Poppendick K.E., Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz, Newsletter of the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Mar. 1995, p.6-8. Illus. 2 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0956.pdf

This document provides a breakdown for 1993 of major accidents notifiable under the German Ordinance on major accidents (see CIS 81-293 - Major Accident Hazard Control Ordinance) and involving persons. Accidents are classified as follows: accidents by type of damage; accidents by groups of persons; accidents by groups of persons and type of damage; number of cases and type of damages to persons; procedure at the time of accident; primary causes of reported accidents. (66742)

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CIS 96-957 Fire protection yearbook 1995/6. Gale M., Loss Prevention Council, ed., Fire Protection Association, Melrose Avenue, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire WD6 2BJ, United Kingdom, 2nd ed., 1995. 160p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 25.00., ISBN 0-902167-22-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0957.pdf

This revised yearbook (see CIS 95-1475 for previous edition) provides basic reference information on fire safety in the United Kingdom. Contents: fire safety structure in the UK (government departments, standards, professional organizations, research and testing); fire services in the UK; fire legislation; fire test facilities; analysis of fire statistics for 1993 with 10-year trends; code of practice for occupational fire brigades; directory of occupational fire brigades; the Fire Protection Association (FPA) and its services. Includes names and addresses of fire brigades and organizations and fire consultancy services. (66282)

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CIS 96-958 Development of pool fire thermal radiation model. Rew P.J., Hulbert W.G., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. iv, 99p. Illus. 85 ref. Price: GBP 20.00., ISBN 0-7176-1084-5 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0958.pdf

Recent developments in modelling the effects of external radiation from pool fires were reviewed and relevant improvements were incorporated into the current HSE (POOLFIRE5) model. Software for the improved model (POOLFIRE6) was developed and validated. The model incorporates correlations for calculating the radiation from the pool surface in two zones: a high emissive power, clean burning layer at the base with a smoky, obscured layer above. A detailed technical specification of the new model is presented along with validation results and an illustration of its use for a typical scenario. (66295)

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CIS 96-959 Safe disposal of vented reacting fluids. Singh J., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. iv, 98p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Price: GBP 30.00., ISBN 0-7176-1107-8 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0959.pdf

This report concerns the design of equipment placed downstream of chemical reactors for the safe disposal of chemicals following emergency relief of runaway reactions. The objective of the disposal units is to eliminate the release of toxic and/or flammable chemicals into the environment. The procedure for selecting a disposal unit is presented along with the basic equations governing the design, and the methodology for experimentally obtaining the data needed. Four different exothermic chemical reactions are presented as examples to illustrate the procedures involved. (66790)

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CIS 96-960 Review of flash fire modelling. Rew P.J., Deaves D.M., Hockey S.M., Lines I.G., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. iv, 65p. Illus. 127 ref. Price: GBP 15.00., ISBN 0-7176-1041-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0960.pdf

This research report discusses the present understanding and modelling of flash fires and presents a proposed framework for the modelling of flame propagation within flash fires. Current methodologies are reviewed with emphasis on the interaction between dispersion and flame propagation, with the aim of identifying conditions under which propagation is retarded or halted. A review is also presented of the way in which flash fires are treated in risk assessments. Examples of risk calculations are given. (66799)

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CIS 96-961 Development of a software model for missile impact damage - Final report. Beard A., Lines I.G., Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. iii, 24p. Illus. 29 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-1027-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0961.pdf

This research report considers potential loss of containment in pipework or vessels initiated by rupture or perforation due to the impact of flying debris. A missile of specified mass and velocity is assumed to impact on a target of steel, concrete or pipework. Current methods for addressing this problem were reviewed and a selection of appropriate formulae were incorporated into a missile impact model. A sample calculation is presented along with possibilities for further development. (66798)

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CIS 96-962 Physiological evaluation of work areas heated by radiators. (German: Physiologische Bewertung von Strahlungsheizungen) Gebhardt H., Müller B.H., Hettinger T., Pause B., Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz, Wirtschaftsverlag NW, Verlag für neue Wissenschaft GmbH, Postfach 10 11 10, 27511 Bremerhaven, Germany, 1995. vi, 107p. Illus. 27 ref., ISBN 3-89429-953-3 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0962.pdf

Radiators are used for heating in various workplaces, such as factories, construction sites etc. In order to derive a uniform system for the physiological evaluation of work areas where radiators are used for heating, a method was developed in a series of laboratory tests to measure the combined effect of heat transmission by convection and radiation in the case of asymmetric radiation. These tests were conducted at air temperatures between -5°C et +15°C, under varying conditions of work task, heat intensity and heat distribution. Objective and subjective physiological effects were included in the evaluation. Based on tolerated conditions, the maximum recommended radiation intensity asymmetry depended largely on the actual air temperature. Considering the perceived temperature levels, good correlation was found between the physiological effects and the black bulb and operating temperatures in the room (ISO 7730, DIN 1946, part 2). On the other hand, no evidence was found for justifying the present-day size requirements for gas-burning radiators, as the thermal radiation they generate seems to have been significantly overestimated. Summaries in German, English and French. (66710)

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CIS 96-963 Concentration fluctuations and averaging time in vapor clouds. Wilson D.J., Center for Chemical Process Safety, American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), 345 East 47th Street, New York, NY 10017-2395, USA, 1995. xvii, 181p. Illus. 132 ref. Index. Price: USD 90.00 (USA and Canada); USD 125.00 (elsewhere)., ISBN 0-8169-0679-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0963.pdf

This manual discusses the following topics related to concentration fluctuations in vapour clouds: averaging time (event duration for an accidental release); estimating the probability of ignition or of receiving a dangerous toxic load; intermittency (periods of zero concentration interspersed with non-zero fluctuating concentration); threshold crossing probability; source size; source density; jet momentum; terrain roughness and atmospheric stability; effects of buildings and obstacles; vertical wind shear; compatibility with mean concentration models. Modelling techniques are discussed along with unresolved issues. (66453)

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CIS 96-964 Prevention and control of accidental releases of hazardous gases. Fthenakis V.M., Van Nostrand Reinhold, 115 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003, USA, 1993. xii, 532p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 65.00., ISBN 0-442-00489-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0964.pdf

Contents of this manual: process and design options for inherently safer plants; hazardous gas detection and monitoring systems; principles of accident prevention; discharge rates through holes in process vessels and piping; passive near-field mitigation; vapour barriers; foam blanketing of spilled volatile chemicals; foam scrubbing; water fog applications for unconfined ammonia releases; mitigation of hydrogen fluoride aerosol clouds with water sprays; modelling of water spraying of toxic gas releases; containment and separation equipment for multi-phase confined releases; containment enclosures; reduced storage temperature of pressurized liquids; control of liquefied toxic gas releases; safety and control systems; legal requirements and guideline; emergency planning. (66934)

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CIS 96-965 Understanding atmospheric dispersion of accidental releases. DeVaull G.E., King J.A., Lantzy R.J., Fontaine D.J., Center for Chemical Process Safety, American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), 345 East 47th Street, New York, NY 10017-2395, USA, 1995. xii, 44p. Illus. 37 ref. Price: USD 50.00 (USA and Canada); USD 70.00 (elsewhere)., ISBN 0-8169-0681-5 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0965.pdf

Contents of this manual: introduction to the processes involved in accidental releases and the resulting downwind transport and dilution of gases, vapours and aerosols; meteorology and turbulence; estimates of release rates from leaks and ruptures; liquid pool evaporation; buoyant and dense-gas jet releases; low-velocity dense-gas releases; passive dispersion; complex flow considerations; toxic vapour hazard evaluations; computer models. (66451)

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CIS 96-966 Expert systems in process safety. Rodgers B.R., Petry F.S., Center for Chemical Process Safety, American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), 345 East 47th Street, New York, NY 10017-2395, USA, 1995. 51p. Illus. 34 ref. Price: USD 50.00 (USA and Canada); USD 70.00 (elsewhere)., ISBN 0-8169-0680-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0966.pdf

Contents of this manual: introduction to expert systems; the tools of expert systems (knowledge-based reasoning, knowledge representation, expert systems shells, programming languages); safety related applications in chemical engineering (automated process hazard analysis, explosion vent design, reporting environmental releases, process hazard review, training in emergency procedures, hazard analysis for process design); building an expert system; case study of an expert system for reporting environmental releases; annotated list of selected software. (66452)

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CIS 96-967 Emergency incident risk management - A safety and health perspective. Kipp J.D., Loflin M.E., Van Nostrand Reinhold, 115 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003, USA, 1996. xvii, 311p. Illus. 11 ref. Index., ISBN 0-442-01926-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0967.pdf

This manual focuses on protecting the health and safety of fire fighters and other professionals who respond to emergencies. Contents: introduction to risk management; collection and analysis of accident, injury and illness data; law, codes and standards; development of a comprehensive risk management plan (the management of risk, identification, evaluation and control of risk, establishing priorities, programme monitoring, training of personnel); emergency risk management (pre-emergency risk management, incident safety officer, personnel accountability, incident management system, post-incident analysis); benefits of effective risk management. (66769)

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CIS 96-968 IMO/ILO guidelines for packing cargo in freight containers of vehicles for use in practice and training. (Portuguese: Normas IMO/OIT para acondicionamento de carga em contentores de carga ou veículos para uso na prática e na instrução) Direcção-Geral de Portos, Navegação e Transportes Marítimos, Inspecção de Navios e Segurança Marítima, Lisboa, Portugal, 1995. 32p. Illus., ISBN 972-8020-07-4 (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0968.pdf

This publication, translation of guidelines jointly produced by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the ILO, is aimed at all those potentially affected through their work by the transportation of dangerous goods (whether the transportation is by road, rail, ship, and including those working in harbours and those involved in loading and unloading operations). Contents: general safety recommendations; visual inspection before loading; safe configuration of the storage area; additional information on storage areas, loading of cargo and the safe handling of dangerous goods; information at the receiving of containers or vehicles transporting cargo. In annex: problems with condensation and other changes produced by temperature variation; labels, warning signs and sign for marine pollution; measures aimed at reducing excessive loads in containers. (66500)

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CIS 96-969 Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres - Part 10: Classification of hazardous areas. (French: Matériel électrique pour atmosphères explosives gazeuses - Partie 10: Classement des régions dangereuses) International Electrotechnical Commission, International Electrotechnical Commission, 3 rue de Varembé, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 3rd ed., Dec. 1995. 111p. Illus. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0969.pdf

This part of IEC 79 concerns the classification of hazardous areas where flammable gas or vapour risks may arise, in order to permit the proper selection and installation of electrical apparatus. Contents: definitions and terms; principles of safety and area classification; area classification procedure (sources of release, type of zone, parameters affecting the extent of the zone); ventilation; documentation. Examples of sources of release, effects of ventilation and hazardous area classification are included. (66420)

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CIS 96-970 Flammable and combustible liquids: Storage in mobile containers. (Spanish: Líquidos inflamables y combustibles: almacenamiento en recipientes móviles) Piqué Ardanuy T., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 10p. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0970.pdf

This information note gives details on the storage of flammable and combustible liquids in mobile containers (third section of Spanish standard ITC-MIE-APQ-001 dated 18.07.91). Subjects covered are: product classification, scope (mobile containers of less than 3m3), general aspects, storage classification and fire protection. Tables are included. (66717)

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CIS 96-971 Chemical reactivity and instability: Preliminary thermodynamic analysis. (Spanish: Reactividad e inestabilidad química: análisis termodinámico preliminar) Bestratén Belloví M., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 7p. 4 ref. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0971.pdf

This information note deals with hazardous chemical reactions. Thermodynamic criteria of risk evaluation, classification of reactive materials, instable molecular structures and preliminary analysis of reactivity are discussed. Tables are included. (66712)

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CIS 96-972 Road transport of dangerous goods: Hazard identification and information. (Spanish: Transporte de mercancías peligrosas por carretera: identificación e información de peligros) Piqué Ardanuy T., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 6p. Illus. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0972.pdf

This information note on the road transport of dangerous goods is based on the text of the Spanish Royal Decree 74/1992. Aspects covered: product hazard identification, including labelling; training and information on hazards and preventive measures (safety instructions). (66719)

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CIS 96-973 Dealing with offshore emergencies. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. iv, 32p. Illus. Price: GBP 7.50., ISBN 0-7176-1037-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0973.pdf

This guidance explains the roles and responsibilities of the various government departments and agencies that may become involved in offshore emergencies. These include: the Department of Transport (Coastguard Agency, Marine Accident Investigation Branch, Transport Security Division, Air Accidents Investigation Branch); the Offshore Safety Division of the Health and Safety Executive; the police; and the Oil and Gas Division of the Department of Trade and Industry. In appendix: possible notification required for different types of emergency or incident. (66805)

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[ Top of page ]

007 Electrical safety

CIS 96-974 Catalogue of European standards, 1996. Comité Européen de Normalisation Electronique (CENELEC), Rue de Stassart 35, 1050 Bruxelles, Belgium, 1996. 347p. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0974.pdf

Catalogue of European standards in the domain of electrical and electronic technology. (66960)

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[ Top of page ]

008 Physical hazards

CIS 96-975 Noise-induced hearing loss, nationality, and blood pressure. Sokas R.K., Moussa M.A.A., Gomes J., Anderson J.A.D., Achuthan K.K., Thain A.B., Risheh Z.A., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.281-288. 22 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0975.pdf

Analysis of medical records of 2,361 oil and gas extraction workers in the United Arab Emirates indicated that 610 of the workers had some degree of noise-induced hearing loss. Hearing status was associated with diastolic blood pressure, age, nationality and body mass index, although the effect was small. When national groupings were evaluated independently, hearing loss was associated with higher systolic and diastolic readings among Asians and Sub-Saharan Africans; no such association was found for Europeans, North Americans, Arabs or North Africans. Noise-induced hearing appears to be associated with elevated resting blood pressure only within certain ethnic groups. (66441)

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CIS 96-976 Prospective evaluation of associations between hearing sensitivity and selected cardiovascular risk factors. Fuortes L.J., Tang S., Pomrehn P., Anderson C., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Aug. 1995, Vol.28, No.2, p.275-280. 25 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0976.pdf

The prospective decline of hearing sensitivity was evaluated in a cohort of university physical plant and technical staff during the period 1984-1993. Age, sex, occupational and nonoccupational noise exposure, smoking, blood pressure and cholesterol level were each associated with a decline in hearing sensitivity. When controlling for age and historical noise exposure, systolic blood pressure and cholesterol level were independently associated with a decline in auditory sensitivity. (66510)

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CIS 96-977 Study of the acoustic behaviour of sound-absorbing materials for possible use in the food industry. (French: Etude du comportement acoustique des matériaux absorbants susceptibles d'être utilisés dans l'industrie alimentaire) Ondet A.M., Melon M., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 1st Quarter 1996, No.162, Note No.2010-162-96, p.19-31. Illus. 28 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0977.pdf

Hygiene constraints in the food industry limit the choice of conventional sound-absorbing materials that can be used. Models potentially usable in the food industry were identified and subject to theoretical and experimental study. A computer model of the acoustic behaviour of the materials available on the market was developed, and their absorption coefficients were measured. The model was validated by comparing the values measured with those calculated. It was then used to determine how the absorption coefficient changed with an air space behind the material. Finally, a noise prediction study demonstrated the usefulness of these materials, applied only to the ceiling, in reducing reverberation at the workplace when reverberation by the walls made a significant contribution to the workplace noise level. (66702)

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CIS 96-978 Vibration environment at the work station of compact construction machine operators. (French: L'environnement vibratoire aux postes de conduite des mini-engins de chantier) Boulanger P., Donati P., Galmiche J.P., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 1st Quarter 1996, No.162, Note No.2011-162-96, p.33-39. Illus. 18 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0978.pdf

The purpose of this study was to estimate vibration levels at the work posts of compact construction machine operators and to comply with the requirements of standards for seat and vehicle test codes. Vibration levels were measured at 15 operator's posts, helping to assess the effectiveness of seat suspension. Most of the compact machines tested produced relatively severe fore-and-aft low-frequency vibration, although the size of this vibration depended on the type of work in progress and the operator's driving style. Only loaders and site dumpers seemed to be subject to strong vertical vibration. These machines are often equipped with compact vertical suspension seats which are quite effective at reducing vertical vibration. The results suggest that seats that successfully pass the INRS class I test for seats of forklift trucks with a load capacity of less than 5 tonnes are suitable for reducing vertical vibration on compact construction machines. In the case of compact site dumpers it is preferable to use the type of seat designed for agricultural tractors with a load capacity of less than 3.6 tonnes. There are no compact seats with fore-and-aft suspension, however. Development work is required here before any tests codes can be proposed. (66703)

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CIS 96-979 Epidemiological and aetiological aspects of low back pain in vibration environments - An update. Wilder D.G., Pope M.H., Clinical Biomechanics, Mar. 1996, Vol.11, No.2, p.61-73. Illus. 144 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0979.pdf

Studies on the relationship between vibration exposure and low back pain are reviewed. Epidemiological studies suggest that vibration is an important risk factor for low back pain. Drivers appear to be at particular risk if exposures exceed those recommended by the ISO exposure limit; drivers who also load and unload trucks may be especially prone to back disorders. The epidemiological data are supported by human and animal studies of spine changes that might produce back pain (lumbar disc flattening, disc fibre strain and height increase, intradiscal pressure). Data indicate that the human spinal system has a characteristic response to whole body vibration in a seated position. (66740)

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CIS 96-980 Where is the research frontier for hand-arm vibration?. Gemne G., Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 1994, Vol.20, Special issue, p.90-99. Illus. 41 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0980.pdf

How to combine diagnostics with exposure evaluation so that reliable risk assessments can be made for different tools and processes is a fundamental problem for current hand-arm vibration research. The scientific foundation of the model, in ISO 5349 (see CIS 90-1698), for white finger (WF) risk prediction has been shown to be insufficient. Prospective epidemiological studies are needed to establish exposure-response relationships addressing the specific aetiological factors. Another important research field concerns WF pathogenesis, which is likely to be a vessel wall lesion causing vasodilatory deficiency. A model is presented for the manifestation of cold-triggered WF in persons with exposure to vibration and other environmental stressors as a result of lowered symptom threshold and a raised level of sympathetic activity. (66818)

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CIS 96-981 Experimental study of hearing damage by impulse noise. (German: Laborexperimentelle Untersuchung zur Gehörschädlichkeit von Impulsschall) Hesse J.M., Irle H., Strasser H., Zeitschrift für Arbeitswissenschaft, Dec. 1994, Vol.48, No.4, p.237-244. Illus. 35 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0981.pdf

Ten volunteers aged 23 to 43 years were exposed to six noise events, the energy of which was equivalent to 8h exposure to 85dB(A). They were exposed to 94dB(A) for 1h and to 113dB(A) for 45s. In the following four exposures the 113dB(A) were split up into 180 impulses each lasting 250ms, 450 impulses of 100ms each, 1,800 impulses of 25ms each, and 9,000 impulses of 5ms each. The temporary threshold shift measured 2min after noise exposure was terminated (TTS2) and the required recovery time were significantly better after exposure to 113dB(A) for 45ms than after exposure to 94dB(A) for 1h. TTS2 and recovery time worsened significantly, however, with an increasing number of impulses of decreasing duration. (66850)

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CIS 96-982 Study on the level of blood pressure and prevalence of arterial hypertension depending on the duration of occupational exposure to industrial noise. Deyanov C., Mincheva L., Hadjiolova I., Ivanovich E., Central European Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1995, Vol.1, No.2, p.109-116. 14 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0982.pdf

In a study of 182 noise-exposed workers and 200 unexposed controls, conventional and occupational cardiovascular risk factors were recorded, blood pressure was measured and electrocardiograms were recorded. Exposed workers had higher levels of systolic blood pressure than the controls, particularly after 40 years of age. Rise in blood pressure was directly related to duration of noise exposure; greatest cardiovascular risk was in workers with more than 20 years exposure. The prevalence of arterial hypertension was 33% among the male workers and 16.5% among the women (23% and 14% in the control groups); women's risk increased considerably with increasing age. (66976)

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CIS 96-983 The serum level of endothelin in patients with hand-arm vibration syndrome (a preliminary report). Kohout J., Topolčan O., Bejčková H., Central European Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1995, Vol.1, No.2, p.169-173. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0983.pdf

Blood levels of endothelin were measured in 17 patients with vascular disease caused by vibration. Endothelin levels, occupation and length of exposure are tabulated for each worker according to the stage of the disease. The highest concentrations were determined in the most advanced forms of the disease. The effect of complicating cardiovascular diseases is discussed. Further studies are required to enable this method to be used in disease diagnosis. (66977)

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CIS 96-984 Most comfortable loudness shift as a measure of speech attenuation by hearing protectors. Letowski T., Burstein N., Clark J., Romanowski L., Sevec A., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Apr. 1995, Vol.56, No.4, p.356-361. Illus. 21 ref. ### (In English)

(67047)

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CIS 96-985 Heat exposure as a hazard to male fertility. Thonneau P., Ducot B., Bujan L., Mieusset R., Spira A., Lancet, 20 Jan. 1996, Vol.347, No.8995, p.204-205. Illus. 4 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0985.pdf

This brief communication describes the results of a questionnaire survey of 522 French women who gave birth to a child between June and October 1992. The questionnaire included questions about the father's working conditions around the time of conception. Couples where the father was occupationally exposed to heat or seated in a vehicle for more than three hours per day at work had longer times to pregnancy than a reference group. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that professional exposure to heat is a risk factor for male fertility. (66320)

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CIS 96-986 Effects of moisture absorption in clothing on the human heat balance. Lotens W.A., Havenith G., Ergonomics, June 1995, Vol.38, No.6, p.1092-1113. Illus. 27 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0986.pdf

A theory of moisture absorption in clothing, with the associated effects of heat transfer, was developed and applied in a computer model. The model considers the body, underclothing, an other layer, and the adjacent air layer. The theory was checked with an experiment involving four subjects who wore heavy woolen clothing, which was either initially dry or humid, in both a warm and a cool environment. Model calculations and experimental results agreed approximately upon the timing and magnitude of the effect of absorbent clothing on heat flows, temperatures and physiological reactions. Contrary to expectations, the vapour resistance observed was lower in the heat than in the cold, probably due to differences in sweat distribution. The usual way to determine clothing characteristics by partitional calorimetry leads to considerable errors when the steady state has not been reached. In clothing that has high absorption properties, the transient effects may be sustained for hours. Tests using the model show few beneficial effects of absorbent clothing on thermal sensation. (66426)

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CIS 96-987 Effects of condensation in clothing on heat transfer. Lotens W.A., Van de Linde F.J.G., Havenith G., Ergonomics, June 1995, Vol.38, No.6, p.1114-1131. Illus. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0987.pdf

The condensation theory presented here enables calculation of the rate of vapour transfer with its associated effects on temperature and total heat transfer inside a clothing ensemble consisting of underclothing, enclosed air, and outer garment. The model was tested in three experiments: (1) impermeable garments worn by subjects with and without plastic wrap around the skin, blocking sweat evaporation underneath the clothing; (2) comparison of heat loss in impermeable and semi-permeable garments and the associated discomfort and strain; (3) subjects working in impermeable garments in cool and warm environments at two work rates, until the limit of tolerance was reached. The measured heat exchange and temperatures are predicted with satisfying accuracy by the model. Numerical analysis shows that the major determinants of heat loss are vapour permeability of the outer garment, skin vapour concentration and air temperature. In the cold, the condensation mechanism may completely compensate for the lack of permeability of the clothing as far as heat dissipation is concerned, but in the heat, impermeable clothing is more stressful. (66427)

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CIS 96-988 Transfer of radiative heat through clothing ensembles. Lotens W.A., Pieters A.M.J., Ergonomics, June 1995, Vol.38, No.6, p.1132-1155. Illus. 24 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0988.pdf

A mathematical model was designed to calculate the temperature and dry heat transfer in the various layers of a clothing ensemble, and the total heat loss of a person who is irradiated for a certain fraction of his or her area. The clothing ensemble that is irradiated by an external heat source is considered to be composed of underclothing, trapped air, and outer fabric. The model was experimentally tested with heat balance methods, using subjects, varying the activity, wind, and radiation characteristics of the outer garment of two-layer ensembles. In two experiments the subjects could only give off dry heat because they were wrapped in plastic film. The model appeared to be correct within about 1°C and 10Wm-2. In a third experiment, sweat evaporation was also taken into account, showing that the resulting physiological heat load of 10 to 30% of the intercepted additional radiation is compensation by additional sweating. The resulting heat strain was fairly mild. The mathematical model is a valid tool for the investigation of heat transfer through two-layer ensembles in radiant environments. (66428)

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CIS 96-989 Cold stress: Part I - Guidelines for the practitioner; Part II - The scientific basis (knowledge base) for the guide. Holmér I., International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Aug. 1994, Vol.14, Nos.1-2, p.139-159. 92 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0989.pdf

In the first part, a guideline is presented intended for persons involved in the design, planning and control of operations intended for cold environments as well as in the actual organization and performance of such work. The guideline provides recommendations on suitable and relevant methods for assessment and control of different types of cold stress as well as examples of measures for their alleviation and prevention. In the second part, the scientific basis of the guide is presented. Topics include: a description of the scope of the problem of cold stress; the health effects of cold; the quantification of cold stress; measures for the prevention and alleviation of cold stress; suggestions for further research. (66621)

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CIS 96-990 Environmental stresses and strains in an extreme situation - The repair of electrometallurgy furnaces. Charuel C., Mercier-Gallay M., Stoklov M., Romazini S., Perdrix A., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1993, Vol.65, No.4, p.253-258. Illus. 24 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0990.pdf

During the replacement of an electrode element from a 20MW continuous casting furnace, excessive temperatures and CO levels were found. The wet bulb globe temperature in the furnace centre was 55°C. In the furnace periphery the WBGT measured 34°C. These temperatures did not change significantly during the 6h of replacement work. The mean CO levels of 110 to 145ppm in the furnace centre exceeded the exposure limit. The average pulse rate was measured at 150/min. It reached 65 to 83% of the maximum theoretical rate. The protective clothing worn by the workers was found to provide no protection against radiant heat and did not allow evaporation. It is recommended that this kind of repair work be limited to 2h and that an insulated floor be used to limit thermal radiation. Recommendations for periodical medical examinations are presented. (66883)

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CIS 96-991 Radiation protection in industry. ALARA, or the culture of residual risk. (French: Radioprotection dans l'industrie. ALARA ou la culture du risque résiduel) Travail et sécurité, July-Aug. 1995, No. 538-539, p.423-430. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0991.pdf

Of the workers in the industrial sector who are exposed to radiation, more than 8% receive doses greater than 15 milliSieverts, while only 5.8% of the workers in the nuclear power sector exceed that value. The ALARA method aims to optimize protection and minimize risk, starting with the design of an installation. Likely exposures are predicted and the most effective protective measures for reducing exposure to target levels are identified, with economic and social factors taken into account. An information-gathering system must be maintained to monitor exposure during operation of the installation, so that corrective measures can be taken if necessary. Practical examples are given. (66302)

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CIS 96-992 Even a wallfull of television sets or computer monitors is not dangerous. (French: Même en batterie, les écrans et moniteurs d'ordinateurs ne sont pas dangereux...) Travail et sécurité, Nov. 1995, No. 542, p.576-578. Illus. 13 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0992.pdf

The French Research and Safety Institute (INRS) measured the levels of X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, electrical and magnetic fields and ultrasound emitted by video and computer equipment. Even when large numbers of screens are present together, as in displays in stores, the levels of radiation and ultrasound are well below exposure limits and do not constitute a hazard. (66306)

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CIS 96-993 Development of a long-term personal radon monitor. van Netten C., Brands R.B., Morley D.R., Sabels B.E., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1107-1110. Illus. 15 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0993.pdf

A personal radon monitor based on track etch technology and housed in a watch casing was developed and field tested. The monitors were worn continuously for two months by 49 subjects. Standard REM AT-100 radon monitors were placed in the homes of each subject and local background radon levels were used to estimate exposure for time spent away from home. A good correlation was obtained between the standard and watch monitors. The watch monitors were well received by participants and are potentially useful for domestic and occupational settings. (66326)

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CIS 96-994 Health effects of very-low-frequency electromagnetic fields - Present knowledge. (Dutch: De invloed van electromagnetische velden van extreem lage frequentie op de gezondheid - Huidige stand van zaken; French: Effets des champs électromagnétiques de très basse fréquence sur la santé - Etat actuel de la question) Adant C., Quaeghebeur L., Cahiers de médecine du travail - Cahiers voor arbeidsgeneeskunde, 1995, Vol.32, No.4, p.257-277. 84 ref. (In Dutch, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0994.pdf

This article is an overview of the present-day knowledge of the carcinogenic effects of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic (EM) fields. Experimental and epidemiologic data provide no definitive evidence on a causal relationship, and even if EM fields do have an adverse effect on health, the risk involving a single person is very low. A summary table provides information on the studies conducted in this field (childhood and adult cancer, leukaemia, brain and breast cancer). For each study, information is provided on the author(s), year of the study, type of study, number of experimental subjects, type of exposure, confounding factors and risk evaluation. Summary in English. (66336)

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CIS 96-995 Occupational exposure to low frequency magnetic fields in health care facilities. Philips K.L., Morandi M.T., Oehme D., Cloutier P.A., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.677-685. Illus. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0995.pdf

Occupational exposures to magnetic fields in the 40-1000Hz range were investigated among hospital health care workers. The magnetic fields monitored were relatively low. They were characterized by a switching pattern of occurrence, variable frequencies that included 60Hz and harmonic bands, and peak excursions that could occur at regular intervals. These characteristics varied both within and among job categories, suggesting that the use of job titles for exposure classification should be approached cautiously. Spot measurements of broadband or 60Hz magnetic fields, or summary indices such as time-weighted average are insufficient to characterize these occupational exposures. (66354)

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CIS 96-996 Characterization of the 60-Hz magnetic fields in schools of the Carleton Board of Education. Sun W.Q., Héroux P., Clifford T., Sadilek V., Hamade F., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.12, p.1215-1224. Illus. 19 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0996.pdf

Magnetic field levels in 79 schools in Canada were measured. Average levels were lower than in many other occupational environments; typing rooms exhibited the highest levels. There was a trend for stronger fields in secondary schools than in elementary or intermediate schools. Sources accounting for the largest hot spots were wires in the floor and electric typewriters. Only 6 of the 350 identifiable hot spots were attributable to nearby high voltage power lines. Results show that magnetic fields in schools may be kept at levels below 0.1µT. (66417)

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CIS 96-997 Radiation transport in a radiotherapy room. Agosteo S., Foglio Para A., Maggioni B., Sangiust V., Terrani S., Borasi G., Health Physics, Jan. 1995, Vol.68, No.1, p.27-34. Illus. 13 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0997.pdf

The photoneutron dose equivalent in a linac radiotherapy room and its entrance maze was investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations under different conditions. Particularly, the effect of neutron absorbers and moderator layers placed on the maze walls was considered. The contribution of prompt gamma rays emitted in absorption reactions of thermal neutrons was also taken into account. The simulation results are compared with some experimental measurements in the therapy room and in the maze. (66633)

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CIS 96-998 Issues in space radiation protection: Galactic cosmic rays. Wilson J.W., Kim M., Schimmerling W., Badavi F.F., Thibeault S.A., Cucinotta F.A., Shinn J.L., Kiefer R., Health Physics, Jan. 1995, Vol.68, No.1, p.50-58. Illus. 28 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0998.pdf

There is limited knowledge concerning the physical properties of and biological responses to cosmic rays. Herein, the current status of space shielding technology and its impact on radiation protection is discussed in terms of conventional protection practice and a test biological response model. The impact of biological response on optimum materials selection for cosmic ray shielding is presented in terms of the transmission characteristics of the shield material. Although liquid hydrogen is an optimum shield material, it is difficult to use. The evaluation of the effectiveness of polymeric structural materials as a substitute must await improvement in our knowledge of both the biological response and the nuclear processes. (66634)

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CIS 96-999 Thorium excretion in feces by mineral sands workers. Terry K.W., Hewson G.S., Meunier G., Health Physics, Jan. 1995, Vol.68, No.1, p.105-109. Illus. 11 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-0999.pdf

An attempt was made to correlate the thorium excreted in the faeces of two male workers in the monazite section of a mineral sands dry separation plant over a ten-day period with personal air sampling measurements. The airborne radioactivity was measured on a daily basis using a total (inspirable) dust filter, an integrating personal dosimeter, and a personal cascade impactor. The thorium content of the faeces was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results suggest that thorium faecal analyses are able to detect acute and chronic exposures to the inhalation of thorium bearing dusts and to confirm the amount of inhaled thorium predicted from air sampling programmes and metabolic models. (66635)

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CIS 96-1000 Present knowledge about specific absorption rates inside a human body exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. Garn H., Gabriel C., Health Physics, Feb. 1995, Vol.68, No.2, p.147-156. Illus. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1000.pdf

The paper presents the results of scientific investigations about the relationship between external field-strengths and specific absorption rates inside the human body. The data were normalized to specific absorption rate (SAR) values that form the basis for current safety standards. Results were compared to exposure limits given in these standards. This comparison should serve as a reference for the selection of reliable reference levels for personal protection against thermal effects in radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The need to measure and monitor ankle/wrist currents to protect some exposed workers is explained. The study has also highlighted a scarcity of dosimetric data at frequencies below 3MHz. (66636)

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CIS 96-1001 Electromagnetic interference with cardiac pacemakers. (French: Stimulateurs cardiaques - Perturbations électromagnétiques en milieu professionnel) Gagny C., Prieur G., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 1st Quarter 1996, No.162, Note No.2014-162-96, p.55-64. Illus. 20 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1001.pdf

The latest technology allows the wearers of implanted cardiac pacemakers to continue working. Following a description of the pacemakers and their behaviour under electromagnetic interference, this information note lists the main sources of electromagnetic radiation found at the workplace and reviews their effects, as described in the literature. Preventive measures are proposed as well. (66706)

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CIS 96-1002 Visual safety of quartz linear lamps. McIntyre D.A., Charman W.N., Murray I.J., Annals of Occupational Hygiene, Apr.1993, Vol.37, No.2, p.191-200. Illus. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1002.pdf

A quartz linear lamp (QLL) is a compact infra-red heating lamp. It consists of a tungsten filament in a quartz envelope, which runs at about 2,400K and produces infra-red radiation with a peak output at 1,200nm. This paper reviews potential hazards to the eye in the context of the ACGIH rules. The probability of retinal thermal injury from an infra-red-A image focused on the retina is examined and it is shown that there is no risk at normal viewing distances. To prevent any risk of cataractogenesis, the rules provide for an upper limit of irradiance (TLV) at the eye of 100Wm-2 in the infra-red-A band. The paper examines the potential hazard from longer wavelengths and concludes that they do not present a hazard with this type of heating, provided that the manufacturer's instructions are followed. (66744)

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CIS 96-1003 Exposure to 50 Hertz magnetic fields and cancer: An overview of the recent literature. De Ridder M., Vanhoorne M., Archives of Public Health, 1995, Vol.53, No.1-4, p.35-52. 44 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1003.pdf

Recent studies on the health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields are reviewed. While many of the epidemiological studies suffer from methodological shortcomings, there is consistency in the findings of an association between childhood leukaemia and residential exposure and between adult leukaemia and brain tumours and occupational exposure. Recent animal studies indicate that 50/60 Hz magnetic fields seem to have a cancer promoting or co-promoting effect. Biological mechanisms of these effects are still unclear. In view of recent findings, a revision of exposure limits and measures to reduce high exposures seems justified. (66781)

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CIS 96-1004 Apparent versus real exposures of nuclear medicine technologists during aerosol lung ventilation scanning. Pityn P.J., King M.E., VanderWerf R., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996. Vol.57, No.2, p.202-204. Illus. 8 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1004.pdf

Results of studies to assess the potential exposure of nuclear medical technologists to airborne radioactive contaminants are discussed. Sources of contamination include faulty equipment and exhalation of aerosols by the patient. Exposure is generally far below compliance limits. Most of the contamination is external rather than internal deposition. Higher contamination levels approaching the allowable limits are rare. Personal respiratory protection is considered to be unwarranted; exposures can be well controlled by suitable work practices. (66802)

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CIS 96-1005 Medical and dosimetric follow-up of contractors dealing with nuclear sites and exposed to ionizing radiation: Legislation, future prospects. (French: Suivi médical et dosimétrie des travailleurs des entreprises extérieures soumis à des rayonnements ionisants: réglementation actuelle, perspectives) Deschamps S., Fleutot J.B., Ducousso R., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.41-50. 28 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1005.pdf

Contractors working on nuclear sites who are exposed to ionizing radiation present problems of medical and dosimetric follow-up. New legal provisions aim at giving these contractors the same level of protection as is provided to other workers: regulations adapted to their needs, reorganization of occupational medical services, individual medical follow-up cards, national computer DOSIMO project, principle of radiation safety certification of companies and training programmes. (66836)

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CIS 96-1006 Infrared radiation and cataract - Risk evaluation in the vicinity of an induction furnace. (French: Rayonnement infrarouge et cataractes - Evaluation des risques à proximité d'un four à induction) Barlier A., Salsi S., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1995, No.161, Note No.2003-161-95, p.469-475. Illus. 18 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1006.pdf

A study was carried out in a steel recycling plant using an induction furnace to assess infrared exposure levels (a potential source of cataracts), the risks to workers and the efficacy of risk prevention measures. The parameters measured were: spectral irradiance between 200 and 3,000nm, and spectral radiance between 400 and 700nm in the vicinity of the furnace door. The spectral transmittance of both means of protection was measured between 200 and 3,000nm. A risk of cataract was shown to exist for staff working in the immediate and less immediate vicinity of the furnace. The face shield with reflective metal coating proved effective, but goggles with green filter lenses were found to provide insufficient protection. (66862)

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CIS 96-1007 Dose-response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis in the low-dose region. Cohen B.L., International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1994, Vol.66, No.2, p.71-75. 39 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1007.pdf

The present knowledge of the effects of low-level radiation gained in in-vitro and epidemiological studies is reviewed. Included are the studies of the effects of radon in homes. The in-vitro studies provide evidence that low-level radiation greatly enhances the efficiency of DNA repair. The epidemiological studies of people exposed to low levels of radiation have shown that cancer incidence is not higher than in the general population. The linear, no-threshold, dose-response relationship used to predict cancer incidence caused by exposure to high radiation doses does not apply for exposure to low doses of radiation. (66886)

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CIS 96-1008 Personnel protection during aerosol ventilation studies using radioactive technetium (TC99m). Huff R.D., Horwitz P., Klash S.J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Dec. 1994, Vol.55, No.12, p.1144-1148. Illus. 14 ref. ### (In English)

(67032)

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CIS 96-1009 Comparisons between magnetic field exposure indices in an automobile transmission plant. Wenzl T.B., Kriebel D., Eisen E.A., Ellenbecker M.J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Apr. 1995, Vol.56, No.4, p.341-348. Illus. 20 ref. ### (In English)

(67045)

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CIS 96-1010 Predictors of hearing protection use among workers - Implications for training programs. Lusk S.L., Ronis D.L., Kerr M.J., Human Factors, Sep. 1995, Vol.37, No.3, p.635-640. 17 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1010.pdf

A conceptual Health Promotion Model was used to identify predictors of hearing protection use among 504 manufacturing workers. In general, the workers reported using hearing protection more than two-thirds of the time they were required to do so; about 40% reported using it all the time and about 10% reported never using it. The strongest predictors of use were self-efficacy, perceived benefits, perceived value and barriers to use. Items in the barriers scale were most strongly correlated with use and had the greatest potential for change. These factors may therefore be used as the basis of a training intervention programme. (66294)

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CIS 96-1011 Personal protective equipment. Effective protection afforded by hearing protectors. (French: Equipements de protection individuelle. L'efficacité effective des protecteurs de l'ouïe) Barbara J.J., Soudry C., Pringalle C., Travail et sécurité, Nov. 1995. No. 542, p.606-614. Illus. 7 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1011.pdf

Presentation of the characteristics of individual hearing protection equipment (earplugs, earmuffs and helmets) with passive or active sound attenuation. Description of applicable French occupational safety and health regulations (rules to be respected by the employer, the occupational physician and the worker) and standards. Presentation of the principal factors that determine the effective protection afforded by the equipment. (66309)

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CIS 96-1012 Physiological method of evaluating protective clothing for work in a cold environment. Marszałek A., Sołtyński K., Sawicka A., International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 1995, Vol.1, No.3, p.235-243. Illus. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1012.pdf

Three kinds of cold protective clothing were tested on six male subjects performing ergometric exercises in a climatic chamber at -10 and -15°C. Changes in core and skin temperature, pulmonary minute ventilation, heart rate, body mass, and temperature and relative humidity under the clothes were measured. Results show that thermal equilibrium was achieved and maintained throughout the investigated work time (60min) and that the tested clothing may be worn during the whole shift. Changes in thermal stress criteria can be used to determine the maximum duration of exposure for cold protective clothing with unknown thermal insulation. (66362)

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CIS 96-1013 Technology advancements in hearing protection circa 1995: Active noise reduction, frequency/amplitude-sensitivity, and uniform attenuation. Casali J.G., Berger E.H., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.2, p.175-185. Illus. 31 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1013.pdf

Developments in hearing protection devices (HPDs) designed to improve communication and signal reception for noise-exposed workers are reviewed. Both active (electronic) and passive (nonelectronic) designs are considered. Topics covered include: effects on auditory perception of conventional HPDs; active noise reduction (ANR) HPDs; analogue and digital ANR devices; applications, reliability and maintainability of ANR-based devices; amplitude-sensitive sound transmission HPDs; HPDs with communications features; passive HPDs (frequency-sensitive, adjustable attenuation, amplitude-sensitive, and uniform-attenuation devices). Operational characteristics, design alternatives and performance data are discussed and recommendations are provided. (66778)

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CIS 96-1014 The occurrence of sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes of radon-exposed underground ore miners. Gundy S., Bank J., Bojtor I., Köteles G.J., Central European Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1995, Vol.1, No.1, p.78-86. 13 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1014.pdf

Frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were investigated in peripheral blood samples taken from underground uranium miners exposed to various levels of radon and from unexposed controls. Six exposure groups were identified according to the level of exposure. While no general tendency was observed in change of SCE frequencies with increasing radon exposure, significant differences were found between certain groups of miners. The findings are discussed with respect to the opportunity for biological monitoring of radon exposed persons. (66974)

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CIS 96-1015 A probabilistic model of hypobaric decompression sickness based on 66 chamber tests. Conkin J., Kumar V., Powell M.R., Foster P.P., Waligora J.M., Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Feb. 1996, Vol.67, No.2, p.176-183. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1015.pdf

An approach to estimating the probability of decompression sickness (DCS) in astronauts performing extravehicular activities (EVAs) is described. Data from 66 hypobaric chamber tests (211 cases of DCS in 1075 exposures) were analyzed. Variables considered were denitrogenation prior to decompression, magnitude of the decompression, exercise after decompression, and length of the EVA. Probability models were fitted using techniques from survival analysis. Constant probability of DCS was better described by tissue ratios that decrease as ambient pressure after decompression decreases, a conclusion supported by other studies. (66679)

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CIS 96-1016 Oxy-helium treatment for refractory neurological decompression sickness: A case report. Goldenberg I., Shupak A., Shoshani O., Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.67, No.1, p.57-60. Illus. 24 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1016.pdf

A case study is presented of a diver with paraparesis and urinary incontinence that appeared 10 minutes after surfacing from a dive. Symptoms persisted even after hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Subsequent oxy-helium treatment resulted in a marked improvement in gait and in sensory and motor function. Examination indicated an upper motor neuron lesion. Further hyperbaric oxygenation resulted in complete restoration of urinary control and virtually complete sensory and motor recovery. The case reinforces the limited clinical data regarding the value of oxy-helium in the treatment of neurological decompression sickness. (66476)

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CIS 96-1017 The distribution of limb pain in decompression sickness. Sowden L.M., Kindwall E.P., Francis T.J.R., Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.67, No.1, p.74-80. Illus. 74 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1017.pdf

A review of over 19,000 cases of limb pain in decompression sickness (DCS) revealed a predominance of upper limb involvement in bounce divers and in aviators; lower limbs were more commonly involved in compressed air workers and saturation divers. A hypothesis based on the counter current exchange of inert gas is put forward as a possible mechanism to explain this reported distribution of limb pain in DCS. The hypothesis is discussed in relation to bounce diving, saturation diving, compressed air workers, and decompression to altitude. (66477)

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CIS 96-1018 Respiratory changes during initial days of acclimatization to increasing altitudes. Basu C.K., Selvamurthy W., Bhaumick G., Gautam R.K., Sawhney R.C., Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.67, No.1, p.40-45. Illus. 31 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1018.pdf

Daily changes in respiratory function were monitored in 16 male subjects at sea level and at high altitudes of 3110m, 3445m, and 4177m. Identical studies were carried out among acclimatized subjects staying at 3110m and 4177m for two years. Respiratory function values are tabulated for each altitude. Initial respiratory adjustment occurred by day 3 at 3110m and showed a further decrement at 4177m with a cyclic variation on day 6. Respiratory adaptation to hypoxia in acclimatized subjects were different at 3110m and 4177m. (66475)

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CIS 96-1019 Study of diving and decompression procedures in working shifts involving different exposure levels - Multilevel diving. (Italian: Studio delle procedure di immersione e di decompressione nei turni di lavoro a livelli diversi di esposizione - multilevel) Zannini D., Magno L., De Lucchi M., Leonardis C., Scarselli R., Prevenzione oggi, Jan.-Mar. 1994, Vol.6, No.1, p.57-94. Illus. 24 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1019.pdf

This study considers both the theoretical premises and the existing literature on problems of work requiring multilevel diving and the advantages of modern digital decompression meters. Related health risks are also reviewed. A software program for algorithmic calculation used to compare various procedures utilizing electronic decompression meters was developed. Another contribution was the use of the Doppler method to study the circulation of gaseous venous bubbles in the lungs to evaluate safety aspects of multilevel diving. Procedures based on the indications supplied by the digital decompression meter regarding a return to the surface without stages are considered a reliable improvement over the use of standard tables (US Navy) for decompression by stages. (66915)

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CIS 96-1020 Automatic sound and vibration measuring equipment for the experimental investigation of acoustic radiation by structures. (French: Dispositif automatique de mesure de grandeurs acoustiques et vibratoires pour l'étude expérimentale du rayonnement acoustique des structures) Loyau T., Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 40 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75860 Paris Cedex 14, France, Dec. 1993. 51p. Illus. 7 ref. ### (In French)

Technological change in electronics and computers has produced immense changes in the tools available to machine designers, in particular in the area of noise and vibration control. This report describes an installation used for the study of simple and more complex machinery, with the source of vibration and noise being mechanical, acoustical or mixed. Detailed descriptions are provided of the measurement rooms, the assembly of the structures under investigation, the equipment that produces the noise or vibration, the automated measuring system and the samplers used. (67022)

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CIS 96-1021 Use of personal monitors to estimate effective dose equivalent and effective dose to workers for external exposure to low-LET radiation. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814-3095, USA, Dec. 1995. vi, 64p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: USD 25.00., ISBN 0-929600-50-9 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1021.pdf

Dose equivalent estimates obtained from personal monitors may significantly overestimate the effective dose equivalent (HE) and effective dose (E). This report explains the quantities HE and E, describes the calibration and use of personal monitors in the USA, and provides practical advice on the use of these monitors in estimating HE and E. The NRCP's recommendations on the use of personal monitors to obtain estimates of HE and E that are conservatively safe for radiation protection purposes are presented. (66375)

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CIS 96-1022 Screening models for releases of radionuclides to atmosphere, surface water and ground. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814-3095, USA, 1996. 2 vols. x, 316p and iii, 205p. Illus. 83 ref. Price: USD 75.00., ISBN 0-929600-47-9 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1022.pdf

This report provides a series of simple screening techniques which may be used to demonstrate compliance with environmental standards or other requirements for releases of radionuclides to the environment. The methods are designed primarily for facilities handling small quantities of radioactive materials released as point source emissions, but may be used by any facility releasing radionuclides. Conservative models and parameters are proposed. Glossary. Volume I presents the derivation of the models. Volume II contains work sheets and examples of screening calculations. (66665)

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CIS 96-1023 The management of solid radioactive waste at Sellafield and Drigg. HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. 2 vols. (iv, 36p. and iv, 93p.). Illus. 13 ref. Price: GBP 10.00 and GBP 25.00., ISBN 0-7176-0980-4, ISBN 0-7176-0981-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1023.pdf

This report describes the results of an audit carried out at two nuclear fuel processing plants in the United Kingdom to establish the current state of radioactive waste management in relation to regulatory requirements. Volume 1 describes the audit methodology, findings, recommendations made and a response by the operators of the sites. Volume 2 presents reports on the waste management arrangements observed in individual buildings. Although none of the waste was considered to pose an immediate risk to workers or the public, the standard of radioactive waste management at both sites was variable. (66793)

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CIS 96-1024 Handbook of material weathering. Wypych G., ChemTec Publishing, 38 Earswick Drive, Toronto-Scarborough, Ontario M1E 1C6, Canada, 2nd ed., 1995. x, 564p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: USD 175.00., ISBN 1-895198-12-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1024.pdf

Contents of this manual: photophysics - energy absorption, dissipation and conversion; photochemistry; environmental conditions; climatic conditions; artificial weathering equipment; measurements in assessment of weathering conditions; sample preparation for weathering studies; natural weathering conditions; typical weathering cycles; artificial weathering versus natural exposure; important variables of weathering; colour fading in textile materials; methods of weathered specimen evaluation; data on specific polymers; effect of polymer morphology on photodegradation kinetics; effect of additives on weathering; weathering of compounded products; stabilization and stabilizers; biodegradation. (66932)

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CIS 96-1025 Calculation of the permissible length of exposure in workplaces with extreme climatic conditions according to the standard ISO 7933. (German: Berechnung von zulässigen Expositionszeiten für klimabelastete Arbeitsplätze durch die Norm ISO 7933) Kampmann B., Piekarski C., Institut für Arbeitswissenschaften der Ruhrkohle AG, Wengeplatz 1, 44369 Dortmund, Germany, 1994. 65p. Illus. 14 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1025.pdf

The length of exposure to heat in anthracite mining is calculated according to the standard ISO 7933 (see CIS 90-1357) in function of various types of clothing and various air velocities. In addition, the workloads which would allow 300, 360 and 480 minutes of work in the moist and hot climate of anthracite mining are calculated according to the standard. Results are presented in the form of graphs identifying those workplaces where environmental conditions lead to intolerable increases in body temperature. A comparison of predictions with measurements reveals the shortcomings of the standard. It is recommended that the mathematical model on which the standard is based be improved with the help of new data from field measurements. (66901)

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CIS 96-1026 Sound solutions - Techniques to reduce noise at work. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. iv, 80p. Illus. 21 ref. Price: GBP 10.95., ISBN 0-7176-0791-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1026.pdf

This document presents a series of 60 case studies illustrating noise control techniques implemented in various industries. The nature of the noise problem is described along with the solution, the cost and the noise reduction benefit achieved. Sources of noise include: aggregate handling, air dryers, axial fans, bottling lines, centrifugal fans, compressed air equipment, compressors, engines, impact presses, pneumatic equipment, punch presses, rotary blowers, saw blades, steam discharge and thicknessing machines. A check-list for use by managers when considering alternative noise control methods is included. (66300)

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CIS 96-1027 Hazards associated with foundry processes - Noise hazards: Foundry moulding machines; Fettling. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. 4p. Illus. 11 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1027.pdf

These two information sheets provide guidance on compliance with the Noise at Work Regulations 1989 (see CIS 90-21) as they apply to foundry moulding machines and fettling. Contents: noise hazards on moulding machines and noise reduction methods (silencers, fitting of rotary instead of piston-type vibrators, enclosures, hearing protection); other noise sources; noise levels during fettling; hierarchy of noise reduction methods (elimination, engineering controls, hearing protection). (66341)

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CIS 96-1028 Exposure of workers to noise - Method for measurement. (French: Exposition des travailleurs au bruit - Méthode de mesurage) Thiéry L., Conseil national du bruit, Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Oct. 1994. 53p. Illus. 36 ref., ISBN 2-7389-0372-X (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1028.pdf

Measuring noise exposure following the provisions of French legislation on workers' protection creates several practical problems: description of work tasks related to noise exposure, choice of measuring apparatus, implementation techniques. In this normative document, these problems are dealt with in such a way as to optimize and control measurement accuracy, facilitate its being carried out and make its results easier to understand. It is aimed at employers, joint safety and health committee members, exposed workers, safety services, occupational physicians, as well as those involved in industrial noise evaluation and control, prevention work and labour inspection. As a training tool, the document can be used both by those who do the measuring as those who are its subjects, and it may be useful during the initial steps of a noise reduction programme. (66752)

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CIS 96-1029 Manually portable chain-saws with internal combustion engine: Determination of sound power levels - Engineering method (grade 2). (French: Scies à chaîne portatives avec moteur thermique: détermination des niveaux de puissance acoustique - Méthode d'expertise (classe 2)) International Organization for Standardization, Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1995. iii, 7p. Illus. 5 ref. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1029en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1029fr.pdf

This International Standard specifies a method for determining the sound power level of manually portable chain-saws. It provides all the information necessary to carry out efficiently and under standardized conditions the determination, declaration and verification of sound power levels of manually portable hand-held chain-saws with an internal combustion engine, as primarily used in forestry. The use of this International Standard ensures the reproducibility of the determination of sound power levels within specified limits determined by the grade of accuracy of the basic noise standard used for the determination of sound power levels. (66962)

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CIS 96-1030 Manually portable brush-cutters and grass-trimmers with internal combustion engine: Determination of sound power levels - Engineering method (Grade 2). (French: Débroussailleuses et coupe-herbe portatifs à moteur à combustion interne: détermination des niveaux de puissance acoustique - Méthode d'expertise (classe 2)) International Organization for Standardization, Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1995. iii, 8p. Illus. 5 ref. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1030en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1030fr.pdf

This International Standard specifies a method of carrying out, efficiently and under standardized conditions, the determination, declaration and verification of sound power levels of manually portable hand-held brush-cutters and grass-trimmers. These units have internal combustion engines and are primarily used in forestry. The use of this International Standard ensures the reproducibility of the determination of sound power levels within specified limits determined by the grade of accuracy of the basic noise standard for the determination of sound power levels used. (66963)

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CIS 96-1031 Acoustics: Determination of sound insulation performances of enclosures - Part 1. Measurements under laboratory conditions (for declaration purposes) - Part 2. Measurements under laboratory conditions (for declaration purposes). (French: Acoustique: détermination de l'isolement acoustique des encoffrements - Partie 1. Mesurages dans des conditions de laboratoire (aux fins de déclaration). Partie 2. Mesurages sur site (aux fins d'acceptation et de vérification)) International Organization for Standardization, Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1995. iv, 14p. 4 ref. + iv, 16p. 4 ref. Illus. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1031en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1031fr.pdf

Part 1 of ISO 11546 specifies laboratory methods for the determination of the sound insulation performance (insertion loss) of small machine enclosures. It applies to a total enclosure only and not to the individual panels from which the enclosure is made. The measurement methods specified are based on International Standards in the series ISO 3640, ISO 9614 and ISO 11200. Depending on the method chosen, the sound insulation performance of the enclosure is determined in terms of the reduction of sound power level or sound pressure level. Part 2 specifies in situ methods for the determination of the sound insulation performance (insertion loss) of machine enclosures. It applies to a total enclosure only and not to the individual panels from which the enclosure is made. The measurement methods specified in this part of ISO 11546 are based on International Standards in the series ISO 3740, ISO 9614 and ISO 11200. Depending on the method chosen, the sound insulation performance of the enclosure is determined in terms of the reduction of sound power level or sound pressure level. (66964)

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CIS 96-1032 Standards for the evaluation of thermal environments in the workplace. (Spanish: Normativa para la evaluación de los ambientes térmicos de trabajo) Carretero R.M., Gómez-Cano M., Lezcano V.M., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, C/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1995. 31p. 5 ref., ISBN 84-7425-424-8 (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1032.pdf

Summary of the various legislative instruments and standards that apply to the evaluation of thermal work environments in Spain. The following information sources are summarized: Annexes I and II of Directive 89/654/EEC (CIS 90-356) on the minimum OSH requirements for the workplace; preparatory work on an EU directive concerning physical hazards in the workplace; ISO, CEN and AENOR (Spanish) standards. The provisions of existing standards on the measurement of thermal conditions are surveyed: measurement of basic temperature parameters; methods for the global evaluation of thermal environments (hot, moderate and cold); evaluation of physiological and psychological stress due to extreme temperatures. In annex: terminology of the preparation of standard; basic parameters used for the description of the thermal environment; scope of existing relevant standards. (66651)

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CIS 96-1033 Evaluation of thermal strain by physiological measurements. (French: Evaluation de l'astreinte thermique par mesures physiologiques) International Organization for Standardization, Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1992. iii, 14p. Illus. 1 ref. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1033en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1033fr.pdf

This International Standard describes methods for measuring and interpreting the following physiological parameters: (a) body core temperature; (b) skin temperature; (c) heart rate; (d) body mass loss. The choice of variables to be measured and techniques to be used is at the discretion of those responsible for the health of the employees. This International Standard defines the conditions which are to be met in order to ensure the accuracy of the data gathered from the different methods. Annex B presents a description of the measurement methods and limit values are proposed in Annex C. (66967)

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CIS 96-1034 The control of sources of ionising radiation. Hughes D., H and H Scientific Consultants Ltd, P.O. Box MT27, Leeds LS17 8QP, United Kingdom, 1995. vii, 86p. 72 ref. Price: GBP 18.00., ISBN 0-948237-17-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1034.pdf

Contents of this handbook: recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection on protection against ionizing radiation (dose/response relationships, effects on the body, aims of radiation protection, dose limitation); UK legislation; protection requirements during industrial radiography, use of gauges and analyzers, work with analytical X-rays and with unsealed radioactive sources, medical and dental applications. In appendices: quantities and units; instruments for detection and measurement. (66661)

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CIS 96-1035 Radioactive facilities: Definition and operating standards. (Spanish: Instalaciones radiactivas: definición y normas para su funcionamiento) Pascual Benés A., Gadea Carrera E., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 5p. 7 ref. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1035.pdf

This information note discusses protection against ionizing radiation in nuclear and radioactive facilities. Definition and classification of nuclear and radioactive facilities, as well as their operating standards, are given. Reference is made to Spanish laws and regulations on the subject. (66713)

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CIS 96-1036 Ionizing radiation: Protection standards. (Spanish: Radiaciones ionizantes: normas de protección) Pascual Benés A., Gadea Carrera E., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 8p. Illus. 9 ref. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1036.pdf

This information note focusses on protective measures against ionizing radiation in accordance with Spanish Royal Decree 53/1992 (see CIS 92-370). Subjects covered are: classification of ionizing radiation, biological effects, dosimetry, protective measures (such as information, training and medical supervision), waste disposal. Tables are included. (66714)

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CIS 96-1037 European standards and protection against non-ionizing radiation. (French: Normalisation européenne et protection contre les rayonnements non ionisants) Hée G., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1995, No.161, p.553-558. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1037.pdf

The purpose of this information note is to present the new European guidelines on radiation protection (ENV 50166 1 & 2), together with recommendations by IRPA and ACGIH. Separate sections deal with: static electric and magnetic fields; low frequency fields (≤10kHz); high-frequency fields (10kHz-300GHz). (66868)

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[ Top of page ]

009 Mechanical hazards, transport

CIS 96-1038 Manual and mechanical handling operations. Better organization for better health. (French: Manutentions manuelles et mécaniques. Organiser pour mieux se porter!) Travail et sécurité, Jan. 1995, No. 532, special issue, 80p. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1038.pdf

Special issue devoted to manual handling. It covers statistical aspects of handling accidents (one of every three occupational accidents), the reasons for and goals of an information campaign, prevention of back pain, the role of the occupational physician, methods for analyzing handling tasks, ideas for the modification of tasks and equipment, regulations applicable in France. Solutions to handling problems implemented in small and medium-sized enterprises are described. (66301)

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CIS 96-1039 Platforms for maintenance and repair of air-conditioned trucks. (German: Arbeitsbühnen für Wartungs- und Reparaturarbeiten an Kühlfahrzeugen) Unfall-Stop - Mitteilungsblatt der Grosshandels- und Lagerei-Berufsgenossenschaft, Mar. 1995, No.2, p.11-13. Illus. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1039.pdf

Fruits and vegetables are usually transported in air-conditioned trucks. The air-conditioning system is usually installed at the top of the truck. For access, ladders need to be installed on these trucks which, in Germany, must be designed in compliance with Accident Prevention Directive VBG 74. Different types of mobile platforms are described for the installation, maintenance and repair of air-conditioning equipment on trucks. Some are adjustable in height and all have railings protecting against falls from heights. (66909)

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CIS 96-1040 Tripping is funny only before it happens. (French: "La glissade n'est risible ... qu'avant l'accident") Folachier M., Tisserand M., Lugdunum B., Tissot C., Bastide J.C., Goris A.M., Richez J.P., Travail et sécurité, Feb. 1996, No.545, p.16-30, 35-52. Illus. 6 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1040.pdf

Accidents due to slipping account for about 10% of all occupational accidents, and for an even higher proportion of home and leisure accidents. Preventive action must be taken on three fronts: preventing slippery materials from spilling on the ground, choosing slip-resistant flooring and equipping personnel with anti-slip footwear. This article discusses: the protection offered by safety shoes as a function of floor surface; characteristics of footwear; analysis of 72 accidents; descriptions of some accidents; cases of falls on the level; main aspects of the hazard; recommended floor coverings; descriptions of the situation in the food industry and in a machine-building enterprise; the many factors behind slips; 600 in-situ measurements of slip resistance; characteristics of slip-resistant floors; anti-slip footwear; methods of measuring slip resistance; applicable French regulations. (66955)

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CIS 96-1041 Machinery-related occupational fatalities in the United States, 1980-1989. Pratt S.G., Kisner S.M., Helmkamp J.C., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Jan. 1996, Vol.38, No.1, p.70-76. 26 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1041.pdf

Data compiled by the National Traumatic Occupational Fatalities surveillance system are analyzed. During the period 1980-1989, machinery-related incidents resulted in 8,505 civilian worker deaths and an average annual fatality rate of 0.80 per 100,000 workers. Fatalities are tabulated by age group, industry division, geographical region, and type of machine. Older workers (65 years and older) had 5.8 times the fatality rate of younger workers (16-64 years). The three industry divisions with highest rates of such fatalities were agriculture, forestry and fishing, mining and construction. Tractors had the highest frequency and fatality rate of all machinery types. (66617)

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CIS 96-1042 Models and measures to reduce the moment of reaction of power offset wrenches. (German: Modelle und Massnahmen zum Reduzieren des Reaktionsmoments bei Winkelschraubern) Lindqvist B., Maschinenmarkt, Nov. 1995, Vol.101, No.45, p.62-65. Illus. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1042.pdf

The influence of work posture and torque on shock exposure of the wrist during bolting was studied with three different offset wrenches. The wrenches differed in weight and in the speed with which they switched off. They were held with the fore-arm in a horizontal or vertical position. The lowest shock exposure was observed with the wrench that switched off the fastest and was held with the fore-arm in a horizontal position. (66854)

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CIS 96-1043 Gloves for boring operations - An unsolved problem. (German: Handschuhe bei Bohrarbeiten - ein ungelöstes Problem) Rauschhofer H.H., Die BG, Nov. 1995, No.11, p.622-626. Illus. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1043.pdf

In machining of sharp-edged metal sheets with rotating tools such as boring and turning mills, gloves are used to provide protection from cuts. However, the gloves tend to get caught in the machines, causing serious accidents in which fingers or even the hand may be severed. The forces acting on a glove when it gets caught in a boring or turning mill were measured. Gloves made of 14 different materials such as leather or rubber and boring and turning mills with eight different diameters were used in experiments with artificial hands. A total of 667 experiments were conducted using 11 different revolutions per minute. In addition, the forces necessary for tearing off a finger were determined experimentally. The results were used in attempts to develop protective gloves that can be worn without hazard. Results showed that neither the presently available nor the newly developed protective gloves can be used in machining sheet metal without risking the loss of fingers or the hand. (66859)

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CIS 96-1044 Rotation speed controllers - Study of stop motion detectors. (French: Contrôleurs de vitesse de rotation - Etude de dispositifs de détection d'arrêt) Marsot J., Ciccotelli J., Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1995, No.161, Note No.2006-161-95, p.497-508. Illus. 9 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1044.pdf

Rotation speed controllers designed to detect low and even zero speeds may be used as safety devices, particularly in mobile interlocking guards with guard locking. This study of 17 detectors (four of which were specially designed for safety related functions) covers uses and regulations, presentation of the detectors studied and their operating principles, testing and recommendations. Provided they are set for the mechanism to be controlled, it is possible with these devices to detect when a mechanism stops. They must have redundant architecture and/or control functions to perform critical safety functions. (66865)

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CIS 96-1045 General periodic checking of certain kinds of working equipment. (French: Vérifications générales périodiques de certains équipements de travail) Cahiers de notes documentaires - Hygiène et sécurité du travail, 4th Quarter 1995, No.161, Note No.2008-161-95, p.525-530. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1045.pdf

This technical note discusses the issues raised by the Orders of 5 March and 3 June 1993 (CIS 94-780), especially as regards to the principle of preventive maintenance. All equipment is covered by the Orders, but the specific checks are not set out in detail. Maintenance and regular checking are the responsibility of the enterprise. (66867)

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CIS 96-1046 Pressure vessels in Italy from the perspective of EC Directives. (Italian: La situazione degli apparecchi a pressione in Italia nel contesto delle direttive europee) Vaccari V., Oddi C., Prevenzione oggi, July-Sep. 1992, Vol.4, No.3, p.25-37. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1046.pdf

Five EC directives in existence since 1976 on pressurized devices are reviewed from the Italian legislative perspective. New mandatory safety measures for the manufacturing and use of such devices within EC Member States are foreseen, starting 1 July 1999, subsequent to the issuing of a new EC directive, whose draft contents are described. (66918)

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CIS 96-1047 Daytime running lights as a vehicle collision countermeasure: The Swedish evidence reconsidered. Theeuwes J., Riemersma J., Accident Analysis and Prevention, Oct. 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.633-642. Illus. 14 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1047.pdf

According to a 1981 study, the introduction of daytime running lights (DRL) in Sweden in 1977 resulted in a reduction of 11% of multiple accidents during daytime. The present study re-examines this evidence and shows that the reported 11% effect is spurious. The effect is mainly the result of the application of a model that shows selective effects of DRL through modelling of unexplained changes in the number of single accidents. It is concluded that the Swedish data fail to show a clear effect of DRL. (66365)

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CIS 96-1048 Motorcycle couriers and occupational accidents. Molina Benito J.A., Janus, 1995, Vol.III, No.21, p.11. Illus. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1048.pdf

Short article discussing the hazards faced by motorcycle couriers in Spain. Most of the couriers are young men 16-22yrs old. According to a recent study, an accident occurs in this sector for every 7400hrs worked. The very high job demands (estimated time allotted for each delivery: 15min) seem to be the main factor in making this job dangerous. (66721)

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CIS 96-1049 Pathology laboratories: Prevention of accidents due to floors that have been made slippery by paraffin. (French: Laboratoires de pathologie - Des solutions aux planchers rendus glissants par les projections de paraffine) Baril-Gingras G., Objectif prévention, 1995, Vol.18, No.5, p.4-6. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1049.pdf

Fine particles of paraffin are projected around the microtome in pathology laboratories, making the floor very slippery. This article proposes several solutions to this problem, all the product of imaginative thinking by laboratory personnel and maintenance staff. (66699)

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CIS 96-1050 Pressure injection into upper limb. (French: Injection sous pression dans le membre supérieur) Casanova D., Aubert J.P., Bardot J., Legre R., Magalon G., Bureau H., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.26-31. 39 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1050.pdf

The subcutaneous injection of a fluids or gases into the upper limbs is an unusual event that may, in serious cases, reduce functional integrity of the limb. Even if initially presenting a benign appearance, the injection injury may result in extensive soft tissue necrosis with sequelae, difficult to treat. From a review of cases, a therapeutic management of cases is recommended as well as preventive action. (66833)

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CIS 96-1051 Thickness effect in 'relatively thin' welded joints. Gurney T.R., Health and Safety Executive, Offshore Technology Report, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. 23p. 31 ref. Price: GBP 10.00., ISBN 0-7176-0978-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1051.pdf

The fatigue strength of some types of welded joints is known to be dependent on thickness. In the light of recent experimental evidence, consideration was given to changing the 'basic' thickness for non-nodal joints from 22 to 16mm. Test results obtained from a literature survey were analyzed to establish the influence of thickness on fatigue strength over the thickness range 12-26mm. Results confirm that the thickness effect can be extended back to at least 16mm. (66367)

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CIS 96-1052 Development of walkdown procedures and pilot study for the assessment of topsides equipment subject to blast induced vibrations. Sharrock I., Wong S., Health and Safety Executive, Offshore Technology Report, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. vi, 73p. Illus. 2 ref. Price: GBP 24.00., ISBN 0-7176-0994-4 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1052.pdf

A methodology for the assessment of offshore platform topsides equipment was developed based on walkdown techniques: methodical, on-site visual evaluations of the equipment. The methodology was verified in a pilot study of a mid 1980s vintage North Sea platform. Two critical safety related systems with representative mechanical and electrical equipment were selected for demonstration purposes. Conclusions are presented which show the feasibility of the method and discuss key points required for its correct implementation, limitations to its use and potential further applications. Glossary. (66368)

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CIS 96-1053 Criteria for jack-ups manoeuvring in close proximity to jacket platforms. Frieze P.A., Lewis T.C., Miller B.L., Health and Safety Executive, Offshore Technology Report, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. i, 58p. Illus. 10 ref. Price: GBP 15.00., ISBN 0-7176-0998-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1053.pdf

Risks associated with the manoeuvring of jack-ups onto location next to a fixed installation were investigated. In order to establish likely impact locations and velocities, a typical procedure for such a manoeuvre was drawn up. Impact modelling studies show that if the mean clearance cited in the procedure can be maintained, the likelihood of impact under normal circumstances is extremely small. The resulting graphs can be used to determine the risk level for a given seastate, duration and intended clearance between the jacket and the jack-up. (66369)

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CIS 96-1054 Fall-arrest devices for hand-operated suspended access equipment. (French: Etudes et essais de quelques parachutes d'échafaudages volants mus à la main) Paureau J., Jacqmin M., Parisot E., Pigeon P., Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 40 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75860 Paris Cedex 14, France, Nov. 1993. 93p. Illus. ### (In French)

For a complete abstract on the same subject, see CIS 94-1747. (67023)

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CIS 96-1055 Guidance on the use of rockbolts to support roadways in coal mines. Health and Safety Commission, Deep Mines Coal Industry Advisory Committee, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 34p. Illus. Price: GBP 9.75., ISBN 0-7176-1082-9 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1055.pdf

This guidance applies to the places in coal mines where rockbolts provide the principal support. Contents: geotechnical assessment and site investigation; support system design; design verification monitoring; routine monitoring and recording scheme (monitoring devices, mine plans and measurement schedules, duties of managers and inspectors); training; suitability of consumable items. In appendix: techniques for measuring the performance of a rockbolt system. (66447)

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CIS 96-1056 Driving safety and steering behaviour of wheeled loaders. (German: Fahr- und Lenkverhalten von Radladern) Gies S., Nied-Menninger T., Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz, Wirtschaftsverlag NW, Verlag für neue Wissenschaft GmbH, Postfach 10 11 10, 27511 Bremerhaven, Germany, 1993. ix, 215p. Illus. 42 ref., ISBN 3-89429-354-3 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1056.pdf

The steerability and danger of overturning of three kinds of wheeled loaders were studied. The selected vehicles are representative of the wheeled loaders presently in use in Germany. Driving tests and computer simulations were used in the studies. Design modifications enhancing the safety of the wheeled loaders are described. Summaries in French, English and German. (66879)

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CIS 96-1057 Sheeting and unsheeting of tipper lorries - Guidance for the road haulage industries. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. iii, 24p. Illus. 16 ref. Price: GBP 7.50., ISBN 0-7176-0888-3 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1057.pdf

Contents of this guidance: general safety requirements; typical hazards of sheeting and unsheeting procedures (slips and falls, exposure to harmful substances, manual handling); analyzing the risk; selection of safety measures; types of sheeting systems (mechanical sheeting, spray sheeting, side wires, access platforms, overhead gantries, traditional loose sheeting). In appendices: legislation; ergonomic considerations; example of a safe system of work. (66448)

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CIS 96-1058 Operator-driven fork-lift trucks. Recommendations R 369 of 1 Dec. 1994 for the training of drivers. (French: Chariots automoteurs de manutention à conducteur porté. Recommandations R 369 du 1er déc. 1994 pour la formation des conducteurs) Travail et sécurité, July-Aug. 1995, No. 538-539, p.437-441. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1058.pdf

Recommendations adopted by the National Technical Committee for the Transport and Handling Industries (France) for training fork-lift truck drivers and testing their driving ability and mental skills. (66303)

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CIS 96-1059 Lifts. (French: Installations d'ascenseurs; German: Aufzugsanlagen) Bircher W., Association suisse pour la sécurité des ascenseurs, Schweizerischer Aufzugsverein (SAV), Postfach 2713, 6002 Luzern, Switzerland, July 1993. 83p. Illus. Price: CHF 50.00. (In French, German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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This practical guide provides clear information on the definitions, legal context and technical rules that must be taken into account when designing lifting installations as well as on all the problems associated with their operation and maintenance. Main contents: definition of terms; legal requirements and technical rules applicable in Switzerland, internationally and in Europe (SIA standards, European standards, International Standardization Organization (ISO)); project development; operation and maintenance; alterations of existing installations; highlights concerning safety regulations. Appendices. (66950)

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CIS 96-1060 Pallet trucks - Principal dimensions. (French: Transpalettes - Dimensions principales) International Organization for Standardization, Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1996. ii, 3p. Illus. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1060en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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This International Standard specifies the principal dimensions for pallet trucks for transporting flat pallets complying generally with ISO 6780 and their loads. The dimensions apply to the height, width and length of the fork arms of pallet trucks which may have either single or tandem trail wheels. It should not be inferred that the use of a particular size of pallet truck is restricted to one particular pallet size. (66961)

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CIS 96-1061 Determination of working load limits to be used with non-reusable slings - Tests. Calculation method. (French: Détermination de la charge maximale d'utilisation des élingues non réutilisables. Essais - Méthodes de calcul. Application à 10 produits - Annexes) Paureau J., Parisot E., Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 40 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75860 Paris Cedex 14, France, Nov. 1993. 19p. ### (In French)

For a complete abstract of this document, see CIS 95-1509. (67021)

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CIS 96-1062 The Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 1992. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1995. 2p. 3 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1062.pdf

This information sheet provides guidance on the Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 1992. Contents: general advice; extension of the Regulations to implement recent European Directives; meeting the requirements (conformity assessment, declaration procedure, marking); enforcement; advice for the designer and manufacturer (technical file contents and procedure). (66343)

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CIS 96-1063 Switching facilities for the safety of persons working on machines. (French: Dispositifs de commande pour la sécurité des personnes travaillant à la machine; German: Schalteinrichtungen für die Sicherheit der an der Maschine tätigen Personen) Troxler R., et al., International Social Security Association (ISSA), International Section "Machine Safety" of ISSA, Dynamostrasse 7-9, 68165 Mannheim, Germany, 1993. 16p. Illus., ISBN 92-843-1063-6 (Eng), ISBN 92-843-2063-1 (fr), ISBN 92-843-7063-9 (deu) (In English, French, German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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This publication indicates to the manufacturer the control safety devices they have to install on machines as well as the type of information they have to supply users with. The user on the other hand can find out what safety device is supposed to be used for the work to be carried out. The brochure is useful for operators, electricians, maintenance workers and repair personnel. (66682)

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CIS 96-1064 Prevention of mechanical hazards: Practical solutions. (French: Prévention des risques mécaniques. Solutions pratiques; German: Vermeidung von mechanischen Gefährdungen: praktische Lösungsvorschläge) International Social Security Association (ISSA), Internationale Sektion "Maschinensicherheit" der IVSS, Dynamostrasse 7-11, 68165 Mannheim, Germany, 1994. 89p. Illus., ISBN 92-843-2080-1 (fr), ISBN 92-843-7080-9 (deu) (In French, German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1064de.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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This guide is aimed at workers who have to deal with mechanical hazards on a machine. Preventive action should follow these steps: define the limitations of the machine, identify possible dangerous occurrences and evaluate the risk, eliminate or reduce the risk, install safety or protective devices, inform the users of the risks, take any additional protective measures deemed necessary. (66683)

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CIS 96-1065 Practical safety data sheet. Safe distances for manually fed plate shears. (French: Fiche pratique de sécurité. Distances de sécurité spécifiques aux cisailles à tôles en service à chargement manuel) Mougeot B., Lupin H., Travail et sécurité, Mar. 1995, No.534. p.205-208. Illus. Also available as an offprint from the INRS. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1065.pdf

Plate shears are dangerous machines, on which guards cannot be completely enclosed because an opening must be left through which the metal sheet can be fed. French standard NF 294, following European Directive 89/392/EEC, specifies for designers of machinery the safe distances that must be achieved by physical barriers to prevent operators from reaching into danger zones. However, this standard has shortcomings that prevent its application to plate shears, and it states that for certain applications it may be justified not to respect the normal safe distances. This information note offers a table of minimal distances between a guard and the danger zone that depend on the height of the opening left by the guard. (66954)

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CIS 96-1066 High-pressure and very high-pressure water spray equipment: Mechanically and manually-guided nozzles. (French: Equipements à jets d'eau sous haute et très haute pression - I. Equipements avec accessoires de projection guidés ou positionnés manuellement) Werle R., Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Mar. 1995. 88p. Illus. 11 ref., ISBN 2-7389-0366-5 (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1066.pdf

This safety guide was prepared in collaboration with designers, manufacturers and users of this kind of equipment. It provides assistance to persons and organizations involved in the installation, use and maintenance of water spray equipment. (66753)

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CIS 96-1067 Approved code of practice for the design, safe operation, maintenance and servicing of boilers. Occupational Safety and Health Service, Department of Labour, P.O. Box 3705, Wellington, New Zealand, Mar. 1996. 85p. 29 ref. Price: NZD 10.00., ISBN 0-477-03573-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1067.pdf

This code of practice applies to all commercial or industrial boilers. It is directed at hazards associated with control system malfunction, fire, fire side explosion, loss of power supply, loss of water, overpressure, overheating, unauthorized access and unauthorized modifications and repairs. General safety measures are set out followed by specific precautions for attended boilers, limited-attendance boilers, under 15hp boilers, unattended boilers, once-through forced circulation coil boilers, low-hazard boilers, pressurized hot water boilers and unfired waste heat boilers. (66804)

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CIS 96-1068 Safety belts: Guidelines for selection, use and maintenance. (Spanish: Cinturones de seguridad: guías para la elección, uso y mantenimiento) Arias Lázaro J.I., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 6p. Illus. 4 ref. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1068.pdf

This information note provides guidelines on the selection, use and maintenance of safety belts used for the prevention of falls from heights. Classification criteria for safety belts and the risk of falls from heights are also discussed. (66711)

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CIS 96-1069 Tractors and machinery for agriculture and forestry: Technical means for ensuring safety - Part 6. Equipment for crop protection. (French: Tracteurs et matériels agricoles et forestiers: dispositifs techniques permettant d'assurer la sécurité - Partie 6. Matériel de protection des cultures) International Organization for Standardization, Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1995. ii, 3p. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1069en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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This part of ISO 4254 specifies special requirements to be considered when designing power-assisted sprayers for crop protection and liquid fertilizer application which are mounted, trailed or self-propelled. The requirements specified in this part of ISO 4254 are supplementary to those in ISO 5254-1. Main contents: definitions; technical requirements; optional fittings; safety information; operator's manual. (66966)

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CIS 96-1070 Forestry machinery: Portable brush-cutters and grass-trimmers - Cutting attachment guard dimensions. (French: Matériel forestier: débroussailleuses et coupe-herbe portatifs - Dimensions du protecteur du dispositif de coupe) International Organization for Standardization, Case postale 56, 1211 Genève 20, Switzerland, 1995. iii, 6p. Illus. 2 ref. (In English, French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
   …6-1070en.pdf
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/9
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This International Standard specifies minimum dimensions for cutting attachment guards of portable hand-held combustion engines, brush-cutters (including brush-saws) and grass-trimmers, for use primarily in forestry. Illustrations for each kind of tool show how the cutting attachment guard must be attached as well as its dimensions. (66968)

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CIS 96-1071 Cold metalworking presses: Improvements in the safety of presses in service undergoing renovation - Guide to users and safety personnel. (French: Presses pour le travail à froid des métaux: Amélioration de la sécurité sur les presses en service dans le cadre de leur rénovation - Guide à l'usage des utilisateurs et des préventeurs) Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Aug. 1995. 37p. Illus. 15 ref., ISBN 2-7389-0326-6 (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1071.pdf

The purpose of this safety guide is to aid users and safety professionals in identifying the hazards associated with cold metalworking presses and in improving the safety of these machines while at the same time not interfering with production. Key-clutch, friction-clutch and hydraulic presses are treated separately. The implementation of the preventive measures proposed in the document is described in the publication Technical specifications for safety personnel and renovation workers (INRS ED 782, see CIS 96-1072). (66754)

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CIS 96-1072 Cold metalworking presses: Improvements in the safety of presses in service undergoing renovation - Technical specifications for safety personnel and renovation workers. (French: Presses pour le travail à froid des métaux: Amélioration de la sécurité sur les presses en service dans le cadre de leur rénovation - Spécifications techniques à l'usage des préventeurs et des rénovateurs) Institut national de recherche et de sécurité, 30 rue Olivier-Noyer, 75680 Paris Cedex 14, France, Apr. 1995. 31p. 18 ref., ISBN 2-7389-0365-7 (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1072.pdf

These technical specifications complement the safety guide on the same subject (INRS ED 783, see CIS 96-1071). Technical solutions to be implemented on presses selected on the basis of the guide are presented. Measures applicable to all cold-metalworking presses, as well as specifically to key-clutch and friction-clutch presses are given. (66755)

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CIS 96-1073 Cold metalworking: Homologation of presses. (French: Travail à froid des métaux - La mise en conformité des presses) Boisnel M., Travail et sécurité, Dec. 1994, No.531, p.844-851. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1073.pdf

This technical information note dated 15 April 1994 provides details on the requirements in France for the homologation of cold metalworking presses according to the provisions of articles R.233-15 - R.233-30 of the Labour Code. Main points covered: purpose and scope of the legal provisions; means of protection; access under certain conditions to the danger zone when the press is lifted; characteristics and installation of fixed, moving and electronic guards; characteristics of two-hand controls; control circuitry; modification of protective measures depending on the operating mode; the special case of key-clutch presses. (66759)

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CIS 96-1074 Railway safety principles and guidance - Part I. Health and Safety Executive, HM Railway Inspectorate, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 45p. Price: GBP 9.95., ISBN 0-7176-0712-7 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1074.pdf

This document sets out top level safety principles which need to be considered in the development and implementation of new and altered railway works, plant and equipment. 33 principles are described relating to the overall safety mission, the infrastructure, stations, stabling areas, the electric traction system, signalling, the control systems, level crossings and trains. Factors which need to be taken into account in implementing the principles are outlined. (66792)

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CIS 96-1075 Guidance for railways, tramways, trolley vehicle systems and other guided transport systems on the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995. Health and Safety Executive, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. iv, 86p. Bibl.ref. Price: GBP 11.50., ISBN 0-7176-1022-5 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1075.pdf

This document provides guidance on compliance with the UK Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR) (see CIS 95-1930) as they apply to railways and other guided transport systems. Guidance is given on: the main duties imposed; where the Regulations apply; who is covered by the Regulations; what is reportable; the reporting procedure; and record keeping. In appendices: definition of a relevant transport system; guidance on dangerous occurrences, major injuries, and specified diseases and conditions; sample reporting forms; text of the Regulations and Schedules. (66807)

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CIS 96-1076 Safety data sheet. Rolls in the textile industry. Protection of nip points. (French: Fiche pratique de sécurité. Les cylindres dans l'industrie textile. Protection des zones de convergence) Guillemin C., Burgert J.C., Koninck A., Robin C., Travail et sécurité, Nov. 1995. No. 542, p.621-624. Illus. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1076.pdf

This data sheet lays out the hazards presented by the cylinders used in textile production, which create nip points when two turn in opposite directions near each other, when one turns near a fixed object or when a material wraps around one. It describes the regulations that apply to new machines and to machines and working equipment already in service. It presents safety measures - intrinsic protection, distance protection, fixed or mobile guards, sensors (non-material barriers, pressure-sensitive bars or carpets, emergency stops) - and the necessary elements in the training and information of personnel. (66310)

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[ Top of page ]

010 Biological hazards

CIS 96-1077 Dust mite allergens in the office environment. Janko M., Gould D.C., Vance L., Stengel C.C., Flack J., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1133-1140. Illus. 31 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1077.pdf

Levels of dust mite allergens were measured in 14 offices in response to numerous health complaints. Methods for sampling deposited dust and for the determination of the Der p I allergen and guanine are described. Nine of the offices were identified as having a dust mite population. Case studies of three offices with high levels of dust mites are presented. In all cases, the infestation was localized to a few specific work areas, office chairs being the primary location. Remedial measures include steam cleaning of all fabric-covered furnishings. (66330)

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CIS 96-1078 Refining a risk model for occupational tuberculosis transmission. Nicas M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.16-22. Illus. 18 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1078.pdf

A probability model is presented to describe the variation with time of levels of exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis aerosol experienced by health care workers. Based on this model, analytical solutions are presented for an individual worker's cumulative risk of tuberculosis infection, and for the worker population mean cumulative risk of infection, with and without use of respiratory protection. Given exposure estimates and a definition of acceptable risk, the risk equations developed in this analysis may be used to assist in the selection of respiratory protection for health care workers. (66482)

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CIS 96-1079 Organic dusts - From knowledge to prevention. Rylander R., Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 1994, Vol.20, Special issue, p.116-122. Illus. 39 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1079.pdf

Vegetable, animal and microbial aerosols (organic dusts) induce a variety of pulmonary disease and subjective symptoms. This review presents the pathology and clinical symptoms related to organic dust exposure. Most of the symptoms are related to inflammation, which is not unexpected in view of the many inflammatory agents present in organic dusts. Prevention is primarily a matter of dust control, information and medical surveillance. In the future, specific agents such as bacterial endotoxins should be controlled. (66820)

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CIS 96-1080 Microbiological decontamination of ventilation systems. (French: La décontamination microbienne des systèmes de ventilation) Lavoie J., Objectif prévention, Winter 1993, Vol.16, No.4, p.30-32. 15 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1080.pdf

Contents of this article: origin of bioaerosols in indoor air; contribution of bioaerosols to indoor air quality; effects on health; decontamination techniques; case study of an industrial-scale laundry serving about 30 Quebec hospitals. (66700)

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CIS 96-1081 Characteristics of blood-containing aerosols generated by common powered dental instruments. Miller R.L., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.670-676. Illus. 26 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1081.pdf

Aerosols generated in the mouths of dental patients were simulated in the laboratory by applying powered dental instruments to whole blood. Rates of production, particle size distribution, persistence, and blood content of the aerosols were measured. All the recovered particles could contain the 0.042µm hepatitis B virus and could be inhaled; many could be retained in the human respiratory system. Of the 0.06 to 2.5µm particles, 15-83% passed through the filter media of nine makes of protective surgical masks used by dentists. Findings lend support to the hypothesis of an airborne route for the hepatitis B infections reported for dental professionals. (66353)

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CIS 96-1082 Work related symptoms, sensitisation, and estimated exposure in workers not previously exposed to laboratory rats. Cullinan P., Lowson D., Nieuwenhuijsen M.J., Gordon S., Tee R.D., Venables K.M., McDonald J.C., Newman Taylor A.J., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sep. 1994, Vol.51, No.9, p.589-592. Illus. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1082.pdf

A major longitudinal study was undertaken to examine the relation between sensitization, allergy symptoms and exposure to aeroallergens in two groups of workers at high risk of developing occupational asthma. The findings of the initial cross-sectional phase of a cohort study of employees exposed to laboratory rats are presented. Symptoms assessed by self-completed questionnaire and sensitization measured by the response to skin prick tests were related to intensity of exposure both to total dust and to rat urinary aeroallergen. Among 238 workers, without previous occupational exposure to rats, work-related symptoms, which started after first employment at the site were related to exposure intensity (expressed either in terms of dust or of aeroallergen) at the time of onset of symptoms. These relations were stronger in atopic subjects but were unrelated to smoking. Positive skin tests to rat urinary extract were also more frequent with increased exposure, a relation found in both atopic subjects and in smokers. There was a strong association between work-related symptoms and specific sensitization. (66821)

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CIS 96-1083 Contact urticaria from chironomids. Galindo P.A., Melero R., García R., Feo F., Gómez E., Fernández F., Contact Dermatitis, Apr. 1996, Vol.34, No.4, p.297. 5 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1083.pdf

A 35-year-old man, with a previous history of propifenazone allergy, worked in a chemist's (drugstore), but as a hobby, kept fish in an aquarium at home. He fed these fish with dried Chironomus plumosus and frozen Chironomus spp red midge larvae. He gave a six-year history of contact urticaria 15min after handling such fish food: conjunctivitis and eyelid oedema could also occur. The urticaria resolved spontaneously in 1-2h and from then on he handled the frozen chironomus spp with latex gloves without any problems. Specific IgE for Chironomus thummi was strongly positive at 56.1kU/L; total IgE was normal (86.5kU/L). There were strong positive reactions to prick tests with both frozen and dried Chrionomus extracts. No such positive reactions were obtained in 10 healthy and 10 atopic subjects, although a rub test with both kinds of fish food showed local urticaria after 15min. This is the second known case of Chironomus allergy to be reported from Spain. (66846)

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CIS 96-1084 Evaluation of standard and modified sampling heads for the International PBI Surface Air System bioaerosol samplers. Jensen P.A., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Mar. 1995, Vol.56, No.3, p.272-279. Illus. 25 ref. ### (In English)

(67041)

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CIS 96-1085 The effect of relative humidity on mouse allergen levels in an environmentally controlled mouse room. Jones R.B., Kacergis J.B., MacDonald M.R., McKnight F.T., Turner W.A., Ohman J.L., Paigen B., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Apr. 1995, Vol.56, No.4, p.398-401. Illus. 12 ref. ### (In English)

(67051)

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CIS 96-1086 Invasive pneumococcal disease in a cohort of predominantly HIV-1 infected female sex-workers in Nairobi, Kenya. Gilks C.F., Ojoo S.A., Ojoo J.C., Brindle R.J., Paul J., Batchelor B.I.F., Kimari J.N., Newnham R., Bwayo J., Plummer F.A., Warrell D.A., Lancet, 16 Mar. 1996, Vol.347, No.9003, p.718-723. Illus. 31 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1086.pdf

Follow-up (1989-1992) cohort study of 719 female prostitutes in sub-Saharan Africa, 132 (18.4%) of whom remained HIV negative at the end of the follow-up period. Invasive pneumococcal disease (pneumonia, maxillary sinusitis, fever etc.) was diagnosed in 79 of the women who were seropositive at the end of the follow-up period, as opposed to only one among those who remained seronegative (RR 17.8, 95% CI 2.5-126.5; incidence rate 42.5/1000 person-yrs in seropositive women). It appears that the bacterium Strep pneumoniae causes more disease, at an earlier stage of HIV immunosuppression, than other bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. (66389)

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CIS 96-1087 Occupational IgE-mediated protein contact dermatitis from pork in a slaughterman. Kanerva L., Contact Dermatitis, Apr. 1996, Vol.34, No.4, p.301-302. 8 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1087.pdf

A non-atopic 24-year-old man had previously had no skin symptoms. Having worked for one month in a slaughterhouse, where he was exposed to animal (pig) flesh and epithelium, he developed redness and itching of the hands, and later, severe exfoliative hand dermatitis which cleared when away from work but relapsed within days back at work. Patch testing and scoring were performed on his back. A modified European standard series gave a positive reaction to chromate but was otherwise negative. Patch testing with pork meat and fat and prick tests with 24 common environmental allergens, including epithelia and natural rubber latex, were both negative, as were prick tests with flour, pork meat and pork fat; a 15-min use test with pork meat on the skin was also negative, but the Magic Lite immunochemiluminometric assay for the detection of specific IgE antibody with both pork meat and pork epithelium clearly indicated IgE-mediated allergy. Contact urticaria caused by pork meat has seldom been reported, but may not be so rare. (66847)

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CIS 96-1088 Biofouling and biocorrosion - Effects of undesired biofilms. (German: Biofouling und Biokorrosion - die Folgen unerwünschter Biofilme) Flemming H.C., Chemie-Ingenieur-Technik, Nov. 1995, Vol.67, No.11, p.1425-1430. Illus. 12 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1088.pdf

Microorganisms are capable of growing on the surface of various kinds of equipment and materials. For example, microbial layers called biofilms have been found on heat exchanger surfaces, in dental equipment, on electronic controls and in water conduits. They may interfere with processes such as heat exchange and filtering processes and be the cause of infections such as legionellosis. They can contribute to corrosion. About 20% of all corrosion damage to metals and building materials is attributed to biofilms. The mechanism of microbial corrosion is explained. (66857)

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CIS 96-1089 Rodent-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses of importance to agricultural workers. Ellis B.A., Mills J.N., Childs J.E., Journal of Agromedicine, 1995, Vol.2, No.4, p.7-44. 178 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1089.pdf

The aetiology, epidemiology, clinical features, treatment and prevention of rodent-borne haemorrhagic fever viruses are discussed. The family Arenaviridae includes Lassa virus, which causes Lassa fever in West Africa, and four South American viruses, Junín, Machupo, Guanarito and Sabiá. At least three members of the genus Hantavirus, family Bunyaviridae, cause haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Europe and Asia. Sin Nombre virus is responsible for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome that has resulted in about 100 cases since its discovery in southwestern USA in 1993. Agricultural workers are particularly at risk because of the increased likelihood of exposure to rodents in rural environments. (66611)

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CIS 96-1090 Infections by Mycobacterium marinum in occupational medicine. (German: Arbeitsmedizinisch relevante Mycobacteriosen durch M. marinum) Schaubschläger W.W., Rüsch-Gerdes S., Gödde M., Arbeitsmedizin - Sozialmedizin - Präventivmedizin, Aug. 1992 Vol.27, No.8, p.331-334. Illus. 11 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1090.pdf

It is difficult to diagnose an infection with Mycobacterium marinum as this case study of a 59-year-old horticulturist reveals. Symptoms are aspecific. Isolation of the Mycobacterium marinum by routine methods is not feasible. Samples require incubation temperatures between 30-32°C, as opposed to the normal 37°C. In the case of the horticulturist, it took two years to identify the cause of the ulcers on his hand. In samples from tropical fish tanks, in which the horticulturist sustained minor hand injuries during work, the presence of Mycobacterium marinum was confirmed. Examination of all other employees of the nursery yielded no further cases of mycobacterium infection. (66910)

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CIS 96-1091 Hepatitis A infection in aircrews: Risk of infection and cost-benefit analysis of hepatitis A vaccination. Gutersohn T., Steffen R., Van Damme P., Holdener F., Beutels P., Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Feb. 1996, Vol.67, No.2, p.153-156. 25 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1091.pdf

Analysis of Swissair medical files for the period 1987 to 1991 revealed 22 cases of hepatitis A among 3,322 crewmembers; all cases occurred in crewmembers who had spent some time on duty in developing countries. For non-immune crewmembers, the overall annual incidence rate was estimated to be 1.53 per 1000, and 12.2 per 1000 during a stay in a high risk country. Male flight attendants had a higher rate than female flight attendants or pilots. Simplified comparison of cost of infection and cost of vaccination indicated that vaccination may be cost-saving to the airline company for both male flight attendants and pilots. (66677)

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CIS 96-1092 An outbreak of ornithosis in a poultry slaughterhouse. (French: Une épidémie d'ornithose dans un abattoir de volailles) Pellé-Duporté D., Kouyoumdjian S., Tuchais E., Carbonnelle B., Simon B., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.51-54. 14 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1092.pdf

Ornithosis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Chlamydia psittaci. Poultry and other birds are the main carriers of the bacteria, transmitted to the human through the respiratory tract. An outbreak of this disease in a French poultry slaughterhouse in April 1990 is reported. Out of 56 workers, 18 developed symptoms compelling them to stop work (4 were sent to hospital). Symptoms combined acute and feverish pneumopathies with a general deterioration of the state of health. In other cases, the clinical picture was less complete. Diagnosis was founded on serology, no germ was isolated by usual bacteriological techniques. The evolution of the disease, after antibiotic treatment, was good in all the cases. Workers were compensated by the French "Régime général de la Sécurité sociale" (occupational disease No.87). (66837)

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CIS 96-1093 Evaluation of airborne particulates and fungi during hospital renovation. Overberger P.A., Wadowsky R.M., Schaper M.M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.706-712. Illus. 24 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1093.pdf

During partial renovation of a hospital floor, the construction zone was placed under negative pressure and separated from patient rooms, and other control measures were implemented to minimize patient exposure to airborne materials. Air sampling showed that at the beginning of the renovation, there were increases in airborne particulates and fungal spores in the construction zone only. During renovation, levels fluctuated inside the construction zone but remained close to baseline values in the patient area. The study demonstrated that the control measures were effective in reducing the increased risk of fungal infection associated with hospital construction projects. (66358)

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CIS 96-1094 Coral dermatitis in the aquarium industry. Tong D., Contact Dermatitis, Sep. 1995, Vol.33, No.3, p.207-208. Illus. 7 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1094.pdf

Case report of an aquarium shop worker with a history of hay fever and contact allergy to prawns who developed dermatitis after contact with coral while changing a tank. Previous reports of skin reactions to corals had been of divers in the natural habitat of these organisms. (66896)

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CIS 96-1095 Malaria control by the nursing staff of Petrobrás Amazônia. (Portuguese: Combate à malária das equipes de enfermagem da Petrobrás Amazônia) Silva A.A.M., de Brito A.M., Revista CIPA, Feb. 1996, Vol.17, No.195, p.76-79. 11 ref. (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1095.pdf

This article describes the malaria prevention efforts of the occupational nursing team of a Brazilian petroleum company active in the Amazon basin. Contents: general characteristics of malaria in Brazil; natural transmission of the disease; endemicity, incubation period, transmissibility, susceptibility and resistance; clinical picture; control measures in the oil terminal port (measures connected to the person and to the environment); nursing activities in the oil terminal port; the prevention experience until now. (66494)

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CIS 96-1096 IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans - Human papillomaviruses. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), IARC Press, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon Cedex 08, France, 1995. viii, 409p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: CHF 80.00., ISBN 92-832-1264-9 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1096.pdf

This monograph represents the views and expert opinions of an IARC Working Group which met in Lyon, France, 6-13 June 1995. The nature of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is described (molecular biology of HPVs, serological response, detection of HPV infections, epidemiology, pathology, therapy and vaccination), along with studies of cancer in animals and humans, and molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. There is compelling evidence that some HPV types are human carcinogens. Overall evaluation: HPV types 16 and 18 are carcinogenic in humans (Group 1); HPV types 31 and 33 are probably carcinogenic in humans (Group 2A); some other HPV types are possibly carcinogenic in humans (Group 2B). (66283)

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CIS 96-1097 The bloodborne pathogens standard: A pragmatic approach. O'Neil J.T., Van Nostrand Reinhold, 115 Fifth Ave., New York NY 10003, USA; Chapman & Hall, 2-6 Boundary Row, London SE1 8HN, United Kingdom, 1996. xiii, 319p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price (in Europe): GBP 34.95., ISBN 0-442-01779-0 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1097.pdf

This handbook on the prevention of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens is aimed at all workers with potential exposure, with a particular emphasis on exposure in a health-care environment. It is a practical guide to the implementation of the 1991 US Bloodborne Pathogen Standard (CIS 93-371). Contents: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and its role in the setting of occupational safety and health standards; hepatitis B (biology of the HBV virus, disease outcomes, transmission, epidemiology, vaccination, post-exposure prophylaxis); HIV and AIDS (biology, the HIV antibody test, transmission, occupational case histories, workers with AIDS); the creation of the Standard; detailed explanation of the Standard (exposure control, methods of compliance, HIV and HBV research laboratories and production facilities, HBV vaccination and post-exposure follow-up, hazard communication, record keeping, effective dates); compliance and legal implications; future trends. In annex: full text of the Standard; various recommendations and guidelines for the prevention of bloodborne infections; management of occupational exposure to HIV, including post-exposure use of zidovudine. (66387)

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CIS 96-1098 Survey of the state of technology involved in the unintended use of certain biological agents in the context of occupational safety. (German: Erhebung des Standes der Technik beim nicht beabsichtigten Umgang mit bestimmten biologischen Arbeitsstoffen aus der Sicht des Arbeitsschutzes) Hüsing B., Knorr C., Menrad K., Strauss E., Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz, Wirtschaftsverlag NW, Verlag für neue Wissenschaft GmbH, Postfach 10 11 10, 27511 Bremerhaven, Germany, 1995. xxiii, 428p. Bibl.ref., ISBN 3-89429-954-1 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1098.pdf

Survey of the unintended uses of biological organisms and agents (bacteria, viruses, fungi, endoparasites, cell cultures, genetically modified microorganisms presenting possible health hazards to man) in agriculture, forestry, the food industry, work involving contact with animals and animal products, microbiological laboratories, health care institutions, waste water treatment plants and contaminated site recovery plants. For each of these economic sectors, the following information is surveyed: biological substances present in the workplace, biological hazards for exposed workers (infections, allergies, toxic syndromes), type and level of exposure, measures of protection and prevention. In addition, the shortcomings of exposure evaluation methods are shown. As a result of the survey, proposals are made for improving safety conditions in the use of these substances. Short summaries in German, English and French. Detailed summaries in German and English. (66709)

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CIS 96-1099 Health hazards in municipal waste disposal. (German: Gesundheitsrisiken bei der Entsorgung kommunaler Abfälle) Stalder K., Verkoyen C., eds., Verlag Die Werkstatt, Lotzestrasse 24a, 37083 Göttingen, Germany, Apr. 1994. 217p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Price: DEM 30.00., ISBN 3-923478-99-2 (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1099.pdf

Proceedings of a symposium on the biological hazards of garbage composting (held in Göttingen, Germany, 28-29 June 1993). Subjects covered: composting methods applied today; emission of pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli during garbage composting; viruses such as Herpes simplex and Coxsackie-B in the air of garbage composting plants; emission of moulds and thermophilic actinomycetes by garbage composting plants; frequently occurring fungi in garbage composting plants; health hazards such as infection and sensitization by allergens in garbage composting plants. (66905)

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CIS 96-1100 Categorisation of biological agents according to hazard and containment categories. Health and Safety Commission, Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 4th ed., 1995. viii, 152p. 13 ref. Price: GBP 8.50., ISBN 0-7176-1038-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1100.pdf

The new edition of this guide (see CIS 91-1019 for previous edition) reflects the need to implement two European Community Directives concerning biological agents (90/679/EEC and 93/88/EEC). Contents: background information on the categorization of biological agents; guidance list of bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi in four hazard groups; guidance on the selection of appropriate containment measures; requirements for each of four levels of containment for laboratories and for work with experimental animals inoculated with biological agents. Appendices provide further guidance on the control of specific biological agents. Includes an Approved List of biological agents. Sections of the guide having legal status are highlighted. (66449)

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CIS 96-1101 White paper: Medical waste disposal. WT-3 Medical Waste Committee, Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, Oct. 1994, Vol.44, p.1176-1179. Illus. 32 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1101.pdf

This paper on medical waste disposal was prepared by the WT-3 Medical Waste Committee of the Technical Council of the Air & Waste Management Association of the United States. In recent years, techniques have been developed to reduce human exposure to the toxic and infectious components of medical wastes. The most commonly used techniques include internal segregation, containment, and incineration. Other common techniques include grinding, shredding, and disinfection, e.g., autoclaving and chemical treatment followed by landfilling. Of all available technologies for medical waste treatment and disposal, incineration has been found to be the most effective method overall for destroying infectious and toxic material, volume reduction, and weight reduction in the medical waste stream. Incineration destroys the broadest variety of medical waste constituents and can recover energy from the medical waste stream. It is also an appropriate alternative to burial of human pathological remains. (66642)

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CIS 96-1102 The treatment and disposal of clinical waste. Collins C.H., Kennedy D.A., H and H Scientific Consultants Ltd, P.O. Box MT27, Leeds LS17 8QP, United Kingdom, 1993. ix, 114p. Illus. 179 réf. Index. Price: GBP 22.00., ISBN 0-948237-18-X (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1102.pdf

Contents of this handbook: clinical waste as a public health concern; perceived and actual hazards (microbial content of clinical waste, the potential for infection, the problem of sharps, release of dioxins and furans); definitions and classification of clinical waste; segregation, collection, storage and transport; waste minimization; final disposal of clinical waste (incineration, landfill, steam sterilization, novel methods); clinical laboratory waste; supervision, education and training. In appendices: United Kingdom legislation; European Community Directives. (66662)

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CIS 96-1103 Biotechnology: Health and safety in education. Health and Safety Commission, Education Service Advisory Committee, HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. v, 26p. 47 ref. Price: GBP 6.95., ISBN 0-7176-0724-0 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1103.pdf

This booklet provides guidance on health and safety in biotechnology processes used in education. Contents: controlling risks in biotechnology processes (risk assessment, hierarchy of risk control measures); controlling hazardous substances (health surveillance, training, personal protective equipment); control of biological hazards (categorization of process organisms not involving genetic modification, notification of use, risk assessment and control, use and control of genetically modified microorganisms, microbiological safety cabinets, flexible film isolators; processes involving foodstuffs, scaling-up processes and pilot plant); control of associated chemical hazards; waste disposal. (66808)

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[ Top of page ]

011 Physiology, ergonomics

CIS 96-1104 A case study of factors influencing the effectiveness of scissor lifts for box palletizing. Stuart-Buttle C., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Nov. 1995, Vol.56, No.11, p.1127-1132. Illus. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1104.pdf

A lumbar motion monitor was used to assess trunk motions, velocities and accelerations for a conveyor-to-pallet manual handling task at a meat processing plant where scissor lifts had been installed to improve task performance. Use of the scissor lift had a higher probability of low back disorder risk than floor palletizing due to subtle barriers, including a raised edge on the conveyor and a railing around the scissor lift. After modifications to the barriers, the scissor lift had a lower probability of risk than floor palletizing. Results are compared with risk probabilities determined using NIOSH guidelines. (66329)

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CIS 96-1105 A cross-validation of the NIOSH limits for manual lifting. Hidalgo J., Genaidy A., Karwowski W., Christensen D., Huston R., Stambough J., Ergonomics, Dec. 1995, Vol.38, No.12, p.2455-2464. Illus. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1105.pdf

The psychophysical, biomechanical and physiological criteria used in establishing the NIOSH limits for manual lifting were cross-validated against recently published data. Relationships between published data and NIOSH limits are tabulated. Results of the psychophysical cross-validation confirmed the validity of assumptions behind the 1991 NIOSH revised lifting equation. However, the results of cross-validation for the biomechanical and physiological criteria were not in total agreement with the 1991 NIOSH model for lifting limits. (66471)

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CIS 96-1106 Study of the physical workload involved in the handling of luggage trolleys in a Parisian airport. (French: Etude de la charge de travail occasionnée par la manipulation des chariots dans un aéroport parisien) Kapitaniak B., Bruneteau P., Cahiers de médecine interprofessionnelle, 1996, Vol.36, No.1, p.5-13. Illus. 7 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1106.pdf

The results of this study show that having to push more than 350 trolleys over a distance of 50m or more than 150 trolleys over 150m per hour becomes a heavy workload for the worker; that pushing more than 20 or 30 trolleys at the same time should be avoided and that strapping the trolleys together does not reduce the hardness of the task. (66689)

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CIS 96-1107 Design of hand tools for women. (German: Zielgruppenorientierte Gestaltung von Handwerkzeugen für Frauen) Lauster P., Schindhelm R., Maschinenmarkt, Nov. 1995, Vol.101, No.45, p.58-60. Illus. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1107.pdf

A survey of 50 women aged between 22 and 50 revealed that 57% use a portable electric hand drill in their home when needed. They reported difficulty in holding and using the tool. An even larger number of women (75%) said they would use such tools if they were not so difficult to handle. The design of a new, optimized hand-held electric hammer drill, based on the survey results, is presented. (66853)

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CIS 96-1108 The visual apparatus and work with particular reference to video-terminal using activities. (Italian: Apparato visivo e lavoro con particolare riferimento alle attività con uso di videoterminali) Pennarola R., Scarselli R., Bongiorno V., Iannuzzi G., Prevenzione oggi, Jan.-Mar., 1994, Vol.6, No.1, p.41-55. Illus. 43 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1108.pdf

Seventy-four visual display terminal (VDT) operators were surveyed in Italy in relation to the action which dust and chemical, physical, biological and ergonomic agents may have on workers' eyes. The principal associated symptoms included: tired eyes, stress, psycho-social disorders, arthropathies. The detected vision disorders are the symptoms of a reversible dysfunctional state. Psychological aspects and disturbances of the locomotor apparatus are of notable importance in the studied sample. Medical surveillance is recommended for VDT operators on the accommodative function and on the structure of the anterior segment, using microbioscopic monitoring techniques. Psychological aspects of the work, including studies of the locomotor apparatus and environmental conditions, should also be conducted. (66914)

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CIS 96-1109 Prevalence and work-relatedness of self-reported carpal tunnel syndrome among US workers - Analysis of the Occupational Health Supplement data of 1988 National Health Interview Survey. Tanaka S., Wild D.K., Seligman P.J., Halperin W.E., Behrens V.J., Putz-Anderson V., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1995, Vol.27, No.4, p.451-470. 51 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1109.pdf

In a survey of 127 million US workers, 1.87 million (1.47%) self-reported carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and 675,000 (0.53%) stated that their prolonged hand discomfort was called CTS by a medical person. Occupations with highest prevalence of self-reported CTS were mail services, health care, construction, assembly and fabrication. Industries with highest prevalence were food products, repair services, transportation and construction. The risk factor most strongly associated with medically called CTS was exposure to repetitive bending and twisting of the hands and wrists at work. Results are consistent with previous findings. (66284)

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CIS 96-1110 A review of the suggested wet bulb globe temperature adjustment for encapsulating protective clothing. Reneau P.D., Bishop P.A., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Jan. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.58-61. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1110.pdf

A review is presented of research relevant to the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) suggested wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) adjustment to threshold limit values (TLV) for workers in vapour barrier encapsulative protective clothing. This adjustment was recommended to be 10° according to the 1990 ACGIH guidelines but was not included in the 1991 guidelines. Six studies were reviewed comparing heart rate and rectal temperature increase over time. Findings support the suggested WBGT TLV adjustment of 10° when wearing encapsulating protective clothing. (66487)

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CIS 96-1111 Thermal comfort of throw-away protective clothing. (German: Thermophysiologischer Tragekomfort von Einwegschutzkleidung) Pause B., Die BG, Apr. 1995, No.4, p.178-182. Illus. 5 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1111.pdf

Forty fabrics used for protective clothing were tested for permeability to water vapour, water vapour uptake, water uptake, heat storage and heat insulation. The fabrics were made of coated or uncoated polyethylene or polypropylene. Measurements were made of the heart rate, skin temperature and sweat rate of volunteers wearing 17 different kinds of throw-away overalls made of synthetic fabrics and two different kinds of cotton fabrics. The climatic conditions and workloads were determined in a questionnaire survey. Activities such as asbestos removal, waste site cleanup, varnishing of vehicles and pesticide application were included in the survey. The thermal comfort of throw-away protective overalls made of synthetic fibres was found to be much lower than that of cotton clothing. Longer periods of wear may lead to excessive increases of body temperature and heart rate. (66908)

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CIS 96-1112 The effect of size and fabric weight of protective coveralls on range of gross body motions. Adams P.S., Keyserling W.M., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Apr. 1995, Vol.56, No.4, p.333-340. Illus. 29 ref. ### (In English)

(67044)

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CIS 96-1113 Respirator mask effects on exercise metabolic measures. Johnson A.T., Dooly C.R., Dotson C.O., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, May 1995, Vol.56, No.5, p.467-473. Illus. 29 ref. ### (In English)

(67053)

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CIS 96-1114 Musculoskeletal symptoms and workload in 12 branches of Dutch agriculture. Hildebrandt V.H., Ergonomics, Dec. 1995, Vol.38, No.12, p.2576-2587. Illus. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1114.pdf

In a questionnaire survey of 2,580 male agricultural workers in the Netherlands, 75% of employees and 71% of employers reported musculoskeletal symptoms during the previous 12 months. Low-back pain was most prevalent followed by symptoms of the neck-shoulder and knees. There were marked differences among agricultural branches in the size and nature of musculoskeletal morbidity as well as in self-reported physical workload. Vegetable growing and arboriculture showed relatively high rates of symptoms and exposure levels. Results highlight priority areas for preventive ergonomic actions. (66474)

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CIS 96-1115 Cardiac frequency throughout a working shift in coal miners. Montoliu M.A., Gonzalez V., Palenciano L., Ergonomics, June 1995, Vol.38, No.6, p.1250-1263. Illus. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1115.pdf

To estimate the physical effort necessary to sustain coal-mining activities in a poorly mechanized mine, cardiac frequency was measured throughout the working shift with a "Sport-Tester" in a representative sample of 73 Asturian miners engaged in a full spectrum of underground work. The mean cardiac frequency in miners working at the coal face (33 subjects, mean age 32.7 yrs, age range 21-48 yrs) was 106.5±18.2 beats/min. In other miners (40 subjects, mean age 34.6 yrs, age range 23-48 yrs) the value was 103.1±17.7 beats/min. The absolute values of subjects' shift-average heart rates were not related to age, measured (treadmill) VO2 max or VO2 max per kg body weight, but there was a weak correlation between these three factors and shift-average heart rate as a percentage of its maximal value. Workshift peak heart rate was negatively related to age. This study provides the distribution of the overall cardiac frequency values likely to be found in subjects working in these poorly mechanized mines. However, average workshift cardiac frequency differs considerably from subject to subject and is largely unpredictable. Summaries in French and German. (66429)

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CIS 96-1116 Work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among sheet metal workers. Welch L.S., Hunting K.L., Kellogg J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.783-791. 30 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1116.pdf

In a survey of 18 disabled sheet metal workers, subjects with rotator cuff injury reported the greatest proportion of time spent hanging duct, an overhead task commonly carried out during field work; carpal tunnel cases reported more hand tool use than did rotator cuff cases. A questionnaire survey of 47 active and retired sheet metal workers showed that the proportion of time spent in a sheet metal shop (as opposed to field work) was associated with hand symptoms; time spent hanging duct was associated with neck and shoulder symptoms. Results highlight construction industry tasks which may increase the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. (66432)

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CIS 96-1117 Musculoskeletal disorders among visual display terminal users in a telecommunications company. Hales T.R., Sauter S.L., Peterson M.R., Fine L.J., Putz-Anderson V., Schleifer L.R., Ochs T.T., Bernard B.P., Ergonomics, Oct. 1994, Vol.37, No.10, Special Issue, p.1603-1621. 79 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1117.pdf

The relationship between workplace factors and work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UE disorders) was assessed in a cross-sectional study of 533 telecommunication employees utilizing video display terminals (VDTs). Cases of UE disorders were defined using symptom questionnaires and physical examinations. Data on demographics, individual factors, work organization and practices, and psychosocial aspects of work, were obtained by questionnaire. Associations between workplace factors and UE disorders were assessed by multiple logistic models generated for each of the four UE areas (neck, shoulder, elbow, hand/wrists). One-hundred and eleven (22%) participants met the case definition for UE disorders: probable tendon-related disorders were the most common (15% of participants), and probable nerve entrapment syndromes was found in 4%. The hand/wrist was the area most affected (12% of participants). The results indicate that work-related UE musculoskeletal disorders are relatively common among telecommunication workers who use VDTs and that the psychosocial work environment is related to the occurrence of these disorders. (66422)

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CIS 96-1118 Musculoskeletal problems in VDT work: A review. Carter J.B., Banister E.W., Ergonomics, Oct. 1994, Vol.37, No.10, Special Issue, p.1623-1648. Illus. 79 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1118.pdf

This paper discusses the possible causes of musculoskeletal pain in VDT workers and outlines strategies to minimize it. Workstation, chair, and keyboard design are reviewed and recommendations are made to improve user comfort. Also discussed is worker selection, training, posture, conditioning, and rest breaks. Short-term musculoskeletal discomfort is experienced by many VDT operators in the telecommunications industry and chronic disability may result in the long term. Ergonomists and office managers should work together to improve the working conditions in this important occupational area. (66423)

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CIS 96-1119 The impact of ergonomic intervention on individual health and corporate prosperity in a telecommunications environment. Aarås A., Ergonomics, Oct. 1994, Vol.37, No.10, Special Issue, p.1679-1696. Illus. 27 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1119.pdf

Summary of several papers published in different journals and conference proceedings. Changes in workload due to improved workplace design and their effect on the incidence of musculoskeletal illness in female workers were evaluated. Sick-leave due to musculoskeletal illness was reduced from 5.3% to 3.1% and turnover from 30.1% to 7.6%. The cost and benefits of this ergonomic intervention were analyzed. Electromyography revealed a quantitative relationship between static load on the trapezius muscle and musculoskeletal sick-leave, related to length of employment. A study of the relationship between postural load and musculoskeletal injury in comparable groups of female workers with respect to age, working hours per day and time of employment showed that the static trapezius load must be kept to a minimum; median arm flexion should be less than 15° and a median arm abduction less than 10°; a forward median flexion of the back of less than 20° did not seem to lead to a higher rate of low back pain for workers with long periods of employment. (66424)

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CIS 96-1120 Remote ergonomic research in space: Spacelab findings and a proposal. Wichman H.A., Donaldson S.I., Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Feb. 1996, Vol.67, No.2, p.171-175. Illus. 8 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1120.pdf

Two prototype studies of crew members working in the micro-G environments aboard the first two flights of Spacelab are described. Video cameras situated in the spacecraft were used to observe various aspects of crew restraint, stabilization, manipulation of controls and mobilization. Particular attention was paid to the use of foot restraints and hand stabilization. Principles for the design of an adequate foot restraint are put forward along with proposals for future spacecraft studies. (66678)

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CIS 96-1121 Analysis and ergonomic redesign of lighting in shunting yards of the Hamburg harbour railway. (German: Analyse und arbeitwissenschaftliches Neugestaltungskonzept der Licht- und Beleuchtungssituation auf den Rangierbahnhöfen der Hamburger Hafenbahn) Fröbner K.D., Richters T., Zeitschrift für Arbeitswissenschaft, Dec. 1994, Vol.48, No.4, p.198-204. Illus. 9 ref. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1121.pdf

Measurements of the illumination levels and luminance on the shunting yards in the harbour of Hamburg, Germany, yielded values below the recommended standards. Contrasts between the tracks and railway wagons were sometimes so low that no distinction could be made. An interrogation of the harbour workers confirmed that visibility at night was poor. From the results of the measurements, the required levels of illumination, luminance and reflection were derived. The lamps and their installation sites as well as their height were selected accordingly. (66848)

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CIS 96-1122 Disorders of the neck and upper limbs in women in the fish processing industry. Ohlsson K., Hansson G.A., Balogh I., Strömberg U., Pålsson B., Nordander C., Rylander L., Skerfving S., Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dec. 1994, Vol.51, No.12, p.826-832. 36 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1122.pdf

The aim of this study was to examine the association between personal factors and physical and psychosocial work environment factors and disorders of the neck or upper limbs. A cross-sectional study was performed on 206 women in the fish processing industry and 208 controls. Subjective complaints were assessed by questionnaire and a clinical examination. The study showed a high prevalence (35%) of diagnoses in the neck or shoulders of the exposed women. There was a pronounced dose-response relation between disorders of the neck or shoulders and duration of employment for women <45 years old. Muscle tension, stress or worry, work strain, and the largest fraction of the work time spent with highly repetitive work tasks were clearly associated with disorders of the neck or shoulders. (66878)

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CIS 96-1123 Musculoskeletal problems among Ontario dental hygienists. Liss G.M., Jesin E., Kusiak R.A., White P., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Oct. 1995, Vol.28, No.4, p.521-540. Illus. 22 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1123.pdf

A survey of dental hygienists and dental assistants (who did not scale teeth) revealed that the dental hygienists were more likely to have had physician-diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and were more likely to report hand/wrist, shoulder and neck problems. Predictors of CTS included the number of heavy calculus patients per day, the position around the dental chair, and years in practice. Predictors of shoulder trouble included days worked per week, time with trunk rotated, and years of practice. Preventive measures should focus on work station design, posture, treating patients with heavy calculus and scheduling rest periods. (66736)

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CIS 96-1124 Ergonomic analysis of watchtower work in a penitentiary institution. (French: Approche ergonomique du travail en mirador dans un établissement pénitentiaire) Guiglini M.H., Bouderlique E, Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Feb. 1996, Vol.57, No.1, p.61-62. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1124.pdf

Paper presented at the meeting of 21 March 1995 of the Society of Occupational Medicine of the Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur and Corsica regions (France). Main issues: needs analysis; methodology; guards assigned to watchtower work; work conditions and the physical environment; task analysis (prescribed tasks vs real tasks); repercussions on operators (physical, mental and psychological workload). Conclusion: improvements must be made in hygiene, maintenance, etc., but not in isolation if they are to be adequate. All changes should be made after consultation with the personnel concerned. (66838)

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CIS 96-1125 Influence of flooring on standing fatigue. Redfern M.S., Chaffin D.B., Human Factors, Sep. 1995, Vol.37, No.3, p.570-581. Illus. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1125.pdf

Eight flooring conditions of varying thickness and stiffness (including one shoe insert) were evaluated by 14 workers. Both the stiffness and thickness of the flooring materials had a significant effect on workers' perceptions of tiredness, fatigue and discomfort. In general, softer materials caused less perceived tiredness; however, one extremely soft floor resulted in higher ratings of tiredness. The shoe insert condition showed low tiredness ratings compared with most floors. Hard surfaces caused greater discomfort including greater low back discomfort. The dynamic properties of the floor surfaces may be important in relieving fatigue and discomfort. (66291)

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CIS 96-1126 Effects of back support on intra-abdominal pressure and lumbar kinetics during heavy lifting. Woodhouse M.L., McCoy R.W., Redondo D.R., Shall L.M., Human Factors, Sep. 1995, Vol.37, No.3, p.582-590. Illus. 28 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1126.pdf

Three different lumbosacral supports (LSSs) were compared with an unsupported condition during a manual lifting task. Intra-abdominal pressures (IAPs) were measured and their corresponding relieving forces on the lower back region were calculated. No significant differences were found among the three LSSs and the non-support condition. This suggests that there is no difference among the LSSs in terms of their biomechanical effects on the lower back and that the use of any LSS does not necessarily afford more protection than a proper lift without one. (66292)

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CIS 96-1127 Computer workstation adjustment: A novel process and large sample study. Hochanadel C.D., Applied Ergonomics, Oct. 1995, Vol.26, No.5, p.315-326. Illus. 45 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1127.pdf

An automated process based on linked-segment anthropometry was developed to analyze computer workstations, identify improper configurations and recommend adjustments. A survey of over 3300 employees in a large industrial complex indicated significant relationships between hours or years worked and symptoms associated with computer use. In a follow-up study, 90% of the respondents indicated a clear understanding of recommendations and an increased knowledge of proper workstation configurations. 80% of those making recommended changes indicated benefits through enhanced work efficiency and comfort. Limitations of the study are discussed. (66344)

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CIS 96-1128 Usability of manual handling aids for transporting materials. Mack K., Haslegrave C.M., Gray M.I., Applied Ergonomics, Oct. 1995, Vol.26, No.5, p.353-364. Illus. 21 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1128.pdf

A survey of 90 users of handling aids was carried out in 12 organizations covering a range of industry and service functions. The most commonly used aids were four-wheeled trolleys, sack trucks, hand pallet trucks and cylinder trolleys. The survey showed that many of the aids were poorly designed or inappropriate for the tasks performed; some design faults increased the risk of injury. Opinions of users are discussed in terms of tasks performed, design factors, forces required, stability, steerability, handle interface, starting and stopping, loading and unloading, and security of the load. Important design features are identified. (66346)

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CIS 96-1129 Bending the tool and the effect on productivity - An investigation of a simulated wire-twisting task. Dempsey P.G., Leamon T.B., American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, July 1995, Vol.56, No.7, p.686-692. Illus. 42 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1129.pdf

Despite investigations into the use of bent-handled tools as a means of reducing deviated wrist postures, the demand for these tools remains low. It was hypothesized that the performance of operators using bent pliers might be significantly lower than that achieved with straight pliers. This was confirmed through an experimental investigation of a simulated wire-twisting task comparing traditional needle-nose pliers with bent-handled pliers. The performance decrement associated with the bent-handled pliers ranged from 1.4% to 17.0% depending on work height. Implications for interventions related to deviated wrist postures are discussed. (66355)

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CIS 96-1130 Perceived discomfort and electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius while working at a VDT station. Hermans V., Spaepen A., International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 1995, Vol.1, No.3, p.208-214. Illus. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1130.pdf

Subjective muscular fatigue was evaluated for 10 female VDT workers over a working day; 5 workers had previous musculoskeletal problems in the shoulder-neck region, 5 had not. Electromyographic activity of the upper right and left trapezius was measured. The subjective scores for the shoulder were significantly higher for the group with complaints. The activity of the trapezius increased for both groups, with no significant differences between the groups. A reduction in load intensity by the introduction of frequent short breaks in continuous activity should be considered even for tasks with low static loads. (66361)

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CIS 96-1131 The effect of different work-rest schedules on fatigue and performance of a simulated directory assistance operator's task. Kopardekar P., Mital A., Ergonomics, Oct. 1994, Vol.37, No.10, Special Issue, p.1697-1707. Illus. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1131.pdf

The directory assistance operator's task with a visual display terminal was simulated to determine the preferable work-rest schedule from among three different schedules: 30min of work followed by a 5min break (30-5); 60min of work followed by a 10min break (60-10); and 120min of work without any break (120-0). The total working duration was 2h. Errors made during the work and subjective responses before and after the working period (2h) were recorded and analyzed. Results showed that the first two work-rest schedules were preferable to the third as significantly fewer errors were made (p ≥ 0.01) when a short break was provided. There was no significant difference (p ≥ 0.10) in errors between the (30-5) and (60-10) schemes. Fewer before and after subjective responses differed significantly for the (30-5) and (60-10) schemes than for the (120-0) scheme. The overall effect of the schemes on subjective responses, however, was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Since both the (30-5) and (60-10) schemes were found acceptable, the (60-10) scheme is recommended since it is easy to implement, causes fewer breaks and therefore fewer work interruptions, and leads to fewer total minutes of break. (66425)

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CIS 96-1132 Work activities and musculoskeletal complaints among preschool workers. Grant K.A., Habes D.J., Tepper A.L., Applied Ergonomics, Dec. 1995, Vol.26, No.6, p.405-410. Illus. 16 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1132.pdf

In a questionnaire survey of 18 workers at a child day care facility, 61% of respondents reported back pain/discomfort. Other complaints included neck/shoulder pain (33%), lower extremity pain (33%) and hand/wrist pain (11%). Observation and analysis of work activities indicated that employees spent significant periods of time kneeling, sitting on the floor, squatting or bending at the waist. Employees working with smaller children and who frequently performed lifts and assumed awkward lower extremity postures tended to have more back complaints than those caring for older children. Recommendations are made for work and workplace modification. (66467)

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CIS 96-1133 Reduction of farmers' postural load during occupationally oriented medical rehabilitation. Nevala-Puranen N., Applied Ergonomics, Dec. 1995, vol.26, No.6, p.411-415. Illus. 12 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1133.pdf

Female farmers with various musculoskeletal symptoms took part in four occupationally-oriented medical rehabilitation courses at a rehabilitation centre in Finland. Work postures and their load on the musculoskeletal system were assessed at the beginning of the three-week rehabilitation period during which new work techniques were learned. Measurements at the end of the course showed that the proportion of strenuous work postures had decreased; simultaneous bent and twisted postures for the back had decreased from 34% to 4% of all studied work postures. Further measurements after six months confirmed that the new work techniques had been adopted. (66468)

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CIS 96-1134 Ergonomic development work: Co-education as a support for user participation at a car assembly plant - A case study. Garmer K., Dahlman S., Sperling L., Applied Ergonomics, Dec. 1995, Vol.26, No.6, p.417-423. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1134.pdf

The design and implementation of an ergonomics co-education programme at a car assembly plant in Sweden is described. The aim of the programme was to extend ergonomics understanding and increase cooperation among operators, manufacturing engineers and managers. The programme consisted of a basic ergonomics package and a dialogue model in which operators specified their requirements and manufacturing engineers suggested alternative solutions. Trial development projects were also carried out. Evaluation studies showed that the programme was successful and provided a good starting point for a process of change and participation. (66469)

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CIS 96-1135 XXXth Congress of the French-Speaking Ergonomical Society. (French: XXXème Congrès de la Société d'Ergonomie de langue française, SELF) Dupery M., Cahiers de médecine interprofessionnelle, 1996, Vol.36, No.1, p.39-48. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1135.pdf

Summary of the papers and discussions held during the 30th Congress of the French-Speaking Ergonomical Society, held in Biarritz, France, 27-29 Sep. 1995. The main theme of the Congress was: Ergonomics and industrial production - people in new types of organizations. (66690)

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CIS 96-1136 Active use of daylight. (German: Aktive Tageslichtnutzung) Corpataux M., Licht, Mar. 1995, Vol.47, No.2-3, p.220-222, 224, 226-228. Illus. (In German)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1136.pdf

Two new illumination systems for offices are outlined. One artificial illumination system is switched by electronic control units according to the illumination levels produced by natural light. Its energy consumption was compared with that of a conventional artificial lighting system. Considerable energy savings could be achieved with the electronically controlled artificial lighting system. The second lighting system uses a computer-controlled mirror and a deflection mirror to direct the sunlight into the building. Sensors are used to switch the artificial lighting system on and off according to demand. (66840)

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CIS 96-1137 Participative ergonomic approach for the renovation of an intensive care unit in the cardiology department of a hospital. (French: Réaménagement d'une unité de soins intensifs de cardiologie avec une méthodologie ergonomique participative) Estryn-Behar M., Milanini G., Cantel M.M., Poirier P., Abriou P., Massemin M., Rispal E., Kadi E., Archives des maladies professionnelles et de médecine du travail, Dec. 1995, Vol.56, No.8, p.624-634. Illus. 10 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1137.pdf

To facilitate care quality and improve working conditions, an ergonomic study was undertaken before the renovation of a cardiologic intensive care unit. Ergonomic observation of 13 complete work days of the different occupations and time schedules was carried out jointly by the ergonomist and the health care team. Time spent in each room, activities undertaken, interruptions, posture, verbal communication among staff and patients were identified, recorded and analyzed. Recommended changes in attitudes and work organization were described. Objective data helped the team in achieving a consensus on appropriate organizational and architectural design. These proposals were simulated in 3-D models in front of the whole team to verify their validity. The main changes proposed are outlined (wards, supply rooms and cardiac emergency rooms). Involvement of representatives of the various occupations all through the study and use of a rigorous methodology contributed to a successful outcome. (66873)

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CIS 96-1138 A model for solving work related musculoskeletal problems in a profitable way. Winkel J., Westgaard R.H., Applied Ergonomics, Apr. 1996, Vol.27, No.2, p.71-77. 46 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1138.pdf

A review of the literature shows that many documented interventions against occupational musculoskeletal disorders are unsuccessful. It is claimed that modern rationalization strategies may not only improve productivity, but also ergonomics. A historical overview of occupational physical work load as a function of ergonomics and of rationalizations is presented, and an intervention concept is put forward based on rationalization and guidelines for physical work load. (66938)

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CIS 96-1139 Guidelines for occupational musculoskeletal load as a basis for intervention: A critical review. Westgaard R.H., Winkel J., Applied Ergonomics, Apr. 1996, Vol.27, No.2, p.79-88. Illus. 72 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1139.pdf

A review is presented of the physical workload concept, the historical development of guidelines and current guidelines as found in ergonomic textbooks. The focus is on the change in the aim of the guidelines over time: increased productivity, reduced fatigue and improved musculoskeletal health. Present guidelines are mainly based on laboratory studies aiming to eliminate short-term physiological or psychological responses. These guidelines are considered to be inadequate and may be misleading in view of recent research regarding the relationship between physical workload exposure and the development of musculoskeletal complaints. (66939)

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CIS 96-1140 Ergonomic effects of a management-based rationalization in assembly work - A case study. Bao S., Mathiassen S.E., Winkel J., Applied Ergonomics, Apr. 1996, Vol.27, No.2, p.89-99. Illus. 22 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1140.pdf

Rationalization of the assembly system in a Swedish manufacturing company focused on the introduction of new management ideas and improved ergonomics. Workload was assessed before and after the changes using expert observations, company records and direct technical measurements. Results indicate that the ergonomic intervention led to only minor improvements. Several of the planned initiatives were never implemented, mainly due to a policy revision caused by changes in the market situation. The realization of the ergonomic potential in a rationalization scheme seems to depend on management culture, as well as on factors outside the company. (66940)

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CIS 96-1141 Surveillance and prevention of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome: An application of the Sentinel Events Notification System for Occupational Risks. Maizlish N., Rudolph L., Dervin K., Sankaranarayan M., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.715-729. Illus. 20 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1141.pdf

The Sentinel Events Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) method was adapted for surveillance of work-related carpal-tunnel syndrome in Santa Clara County, California, USA. Between 1989 and 1991, 54 health care providers in 14 medical facilities reported 382 cases from 195 work sites; 365 cases met reporting guidelines for work-related cases. Studies at six of the 24 work sites selected for investigation revealed a range of risk factors. This surveillance system linked to work site follow-up captured a number of cases of carpal-tunnel syndrome not reported in the pre-existing reporting system and revealed a clustering of occupational risk factors. (66316)

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CIS 96-1142 Repetitive industrial work and neck and upper limb disorders in females. Ohlsson K., Attewell R.G., Pålsson B., Karlsson B., Balogh I., Johnsson B., Ahlm A., Skerfving S., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, May 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.731-747. 48 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1142.pdf

Physical examinations of the neck and upper limbs among 82 female industrial workers performing repetitive work tasks revealed a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck/shoulders and elbows/hands compared with a group of women performing more varied work tasks. Age, tendencies towards subjective muscular tension, and stress/worry were also associated with disorders in the neck/shoulders. Videotape recordings of 74 workers revealed associations between neck flexion and elevation and abduction of the arm and the prevalence of neck/shoulder diagnoses. The study highlights the role of both ergonomic and personal factors in the prevalence of these disorders. (66317)

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CIS 96-1143 Development of predictive equations for lifting strengths. Kumar S., Applied Ergonomics, Oct. 1995, Vol.26, No.5, p.327-341. Illus. 34 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1143.pdf

Lifting strengths were measured for 30 subjects (18 males and 12 females) performing stoop lifts and squat lifts. For each lift, strengths were tested in standard posture, and isokinetic and isometric modes at half, three-quarters and full horizontal individual reach distances in sagittal, 30° lateral and 60° lateral planes. There was a significant correlation between lifting strength on one hand and the sex of the subject, and the reach, plane and velocity of the lift on the other; more than 70% of variance in lifting strength was accounted for by the anthropometric variables and sagittal plane strength values. Human lifting strength capabilities may be predicted based on simple anthropometric and strength characteristics. (66345)

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CIS 96-1144 Work-related upper-extremity disorders and work disability: Clinical and psychosocial presentation. Himmelstein J.S., Feuerstein M., Stanek E.J., Koyamatsu K., Pransky G.S., Morgan W., Anderson K.O., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Nov. 1995, Vol.37, No.11, p.1278-1286. 27 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1144.pdf

The characteristics of 124 patients (55 currently working and 59 work-disabled) with upper-extremity disorders were evaluated. The work-disabled group reported less time on the job, more surgeries, a higher frequency of acute antecedent trauma and more commonly had "indeterminate" musculoskeletal diagnoses. They also reported higher pain levels, more anger with their employer and a greater psychological response to pain. Findings suggest that in addition to medical management, more aggressive approaches to pain control, prevention of unnecessary surgery, efforts to improve patients' abilities to manage pain, and attention to employer-employee conflicts may be important in preventing prolonged work disability in this population. (66378)

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CIS 96-1145 Variability in the median and ulnar nerve latencies: Implications for diagnosing entrapment. Radecki P., Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Nov. 1995, Vol.37, no.11, p.1293-1299. Illus. 21 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1145.pdf

Electrodiagnostic studies were performed on 1472 patients with upper-extremity symptoms. Age and anthropometric measurements were the major determinants of median and ulnar nerve latency variability at the wrist. For patients with work-related complaints, there was only slight correlation between workplace factors and latency. An increased wrist ratio, an increased body mass index and ageing were associated with prolongation of median latencies, and ageing and increased height with prolongation of ulnar latencies. Interpretation of electrodiagnostic studies of the median and ulnar nerves should include consideration of age and anthropometric measures, otherwise entrapment neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome will be overdiagnosed. (66380)

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CIS 96-1146 An evaluation of scheduled bright light and darkness on rotating shiftworkers: Trial and limitations. Budnick L.D., Lerman S.E., Nicolich M.J., American Journal of Industrial Medicine, June 1995, Vol.27, No.6, p.771-782. Illus. 45 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1146.pdf

Thirteen industrial workers were exposed to scheduled bright light of 6,000-12,000 lux on at least half of their 12-hour night shifts, as well as ambient light of 1,200-1,500 lux. Ten workers had morning melatonin suppression on the night shift, and 50% had a significant circadian change. Most findings concerning self-perceived alertness, performance at work and sleep patterns were mixed and inconsistent. The alteration in urinary melatonin levels provides objective evidence that bright light technology can alter the circadian rhythm of industrial workers. (66431)

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CIS 96-1147 Computer mouse use and cumulative trauma disorders of the upper extremities. Fogleman M., Brogmus G., Ergonomics, Dec. 1995, Vol.38, No.12, p.2465-2475. Illus. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1147.pdf

Workers' compensation data relating to cumulative trauma disorders of the upper extremities associated with computer use and computer mouse use were analyzed for the period 1986 to 1993. Numbers of claims, total cost and average cost per claim are tabulated for males and females. Although there were few claims related to computer mouse use, this would appear to be a growing problem requiring more research and intervention attention. (66472)

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CIS 96-1148 Choice of optimization models for predicting spinal forces in a three-dimensional analysis of heavy work. Hughes R.E., Ergonomics, Dec. 1995, Vol.38, No.12, p.2476-2484. Illus. 23 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1148.pdf

Biomechanical models for predicting spinal compression forces were evaluated. 41 work postures in an aluminium reduction facility were videotaped and a biomechanical model was used to compute the L2/L3 moments about the sagittal, frontal and transverse planes. The shear and compression forces acting on the spine were computed from the L2/L3 moments using four optimization model formulations. Results indicated that the choice of model formulation can significantly affect the magnitude of spinal compression force predictions during analysis of industrial tasks. Of the four models considered, the Minimum Stress Compression model predicted the highest compression forces. (66473)

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CIS 96-1149 Maximum permissible lifting loads. Revised NIOSH equation. (French: Charge maximale admissible de lever de charges. L'équation révisée du NIOSH) Aptel M., Dronsart P., Ministère du Travail (France), Documents pour le médecin du travail, 2nd Quarter 1995, No.62, p.113-118. Illus. 6 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1149.pdf

A model has been developed by NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, USA) for the evaluation and analysis of two-hand lifting as a factor in the development of backache. This article describes this model, last revised in 1991. The main purpose of the model is to serve as a tool for safety personnel in their fight against backache in the workplace. (66697)

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CIS 96-1150 The injury profile of a large telecommunication company: A statistical summary. Mital A., Ghahramani B., Ergonomics, Oct. 1994, Vol.37, No.10, Special Issue, p.1591-1601. 8 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1150.pdf

Over the years, over-exertion injuries have continued to increase despite ergonomic interventions to control their frequency of occurrence. Occupational injury and illness data from a large US telecommunications company (297,548 employees), collected over a seven-year period, suggest that: (1) better record-keeping may be a reason behind the reported increase in injuries; workday losses decline as a result of improved ergonomic and occupational health interventions; (2) serious injuries are not just limited to heavy manufacturing industries; and (3) reduction in workday losses may not translate in injury cost savings. (66421)

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CIS 96-1151 Ergonomics in back pain - A guide to prevention and rehabilitation. Khalil T.M., Abdel-Moty E.M., Rosomoff R.S., Rosomoff H.L., Van Nostrand Reinhold, 115 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003, USA, 1993. xii, 223p. Illus. 374 ref. Index. Price: GBP 37.50., ISBN 0-442-01375-2 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1151.pdf

Contents of this manual: introduction to ergonomics; causes, effects and costs of low back pain; low back pain management and the role of ergonomics in the pre-injury, rehabilitation and post-rehabilitation stages; ergonomic job analysis and workplace design; postural correction; biomechanical approaches to stress reduction; knowledge and awareness of body mechanics; evaluation of human characteristics; biofeedback, muscle reeducation and functional electric stimulation; work conditioning and work hardening; applications and case studies of ergonomic interventions. (66768)

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CIS 96-1152 Muscular, articular and periarticular occupational overuse syndrome. (French: Pathologie d'hypersollicitation musculaire, articulaire et périarticulaire d'origine professionnelle) Pujol M., Soulat J., Encyclopédie médico-chirurgicale, Toxicologie-Pathologie professionnelle, 1st Quarter 1996, No.110. 6p. 7 ref. (In French)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1152.pdf

Main contents of this information note on occupational overuse syndrome: theoretical overview; general aspects (terminology; study methods; frequency; aetiopathology; affected side; types of injuries); overuse syndrome of the upper limb (cervico-thoracic syndrome; shoulder diseases (including risk occupations or occupational environments, rotator cuff syndrome; shoulder tunnel neuropathies); elbow diseases; wrist and hand diseases (wrist tunnel syndromes); overuse syndrome of the lower limb (diseases scheduled in France: schedules 57 and 79); overuse syndrome of the spine (compensation, prevention). (66870)

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CIS 96-1153 Nigh work and shift work: Food intake. (Spanish: Trabajo nocturno y trabajo a turnos: alimentación) Nogareda Cuixart S., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 4p. 17 ref. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1153.pdf

This information note analyzes the consequences of night and shift work for the digestive system due to the disturbance of the workers' circadian rhythms and provides recommendations in terms of diet for these workers. Tables are included. (66720)

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012 Stress, psychosocial factors

CIS 96-1154 Issues of human reliability analysis in the context of probabilistic safety studies. Kosmowski K.T., International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 1995, Vol.1, No.3, p.276-293. Illus. 40 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1154.pdf

Models for human reliability analysis (HRA) techniques are described and three groups of techniques often used in probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) are identified. Human behaviour types are discussed along with error types (slips, lapses, mistakes), incorrect human outputs (errors of omission or commission), action phases and performance-shaping factors. A tree is proposed to facilitate the selection of a specific method for the evaluation of human reliability in a particular situation. A software system based on expert system technology to facilitate and document PSA and HRA is outlined. (66363)

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CIS 96-1155 A filter model to describe bias in official statistics on alcohol-related injuries. Webb G.R., Accident Analysis and Prevention, Oct. 1995, Vol.27, No.5, p.687-697. 77 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1155.pdf

The described filter model consists of four levels: the total incidence of alcohol-related injuries; the incidence of reported alcohol-related injuries; the incidence of reported alcohol-related injuries where the contribution of alcohol has been correctly identified; and official statistics on alcohol-related injuries. A filtering mechanism between each of the levels allows some of the data to pass through to the next level. The data at each level and the filtering mechanisms which result in progressive loss of data are described. Suggestions are put forward for improving the quality of official statistics on alcohol-related injuries. (66366)

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CIS 96-1156 The use of anti-depressants and benzodiazepines in the perpetrators and victims of accidents. Currie D., Hashemi K., Fothergill J., Findlay A., Harris A., Hindmarch I., Occupational Medicine, Dec. 1995, Vol.45, No.6, p.323-325. 10 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1156.pdf

Blood samples were taken from people involved in accidents presenting at two hospitals over a five-month period. The 229 samples collected were analyzed for the presence of sedative agents: alcohol, tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs) and benzodiazepines (BZs). Sixty-three samples (27.5%) were positive for at least one alcohol, TCA or BZ. There was a significantly greater representation of TCAs and BZs in the blood taken from a group 'responsible' for an accident compared to a 'not responsible' group. Results support the view that these drugs may play an important role in the causation of accidents. (66459)

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CIS 96-1157 Managing stress in the workplace: Part I - Guidelines for the practitioner; Part II - The scientific basis (knowledge base) for the guide. Williamson A.M., International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, Aug. 1994, Vol.14, Nos.1-2, p.161-196. 210 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1157.pdf

In the first part, a guideline is presented aimed at practitioners in the workplace who are responsible for ensuring the healthy, safe and productive conduct of work. It is intended to provide some assistance in reducing the negative consequences of workplace stress. Discussion about specific sources of stress is limited to only a few examples. The aim of the guideline is to provide an overview of the approaches that could be adopted to reduce the negative effects of stress from all workplace sources. In the second part, the scientific basis of the guide is presented. Topics include: a description of the problem, including early models of stress; the scope of the problem; workplace stressors and their measurement; the stress response; successful interventions to reduce the problem. (66622)

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CIS 96-1158 The relation between psychosocial job strain, and preterm delivery and low birthweight for gestational age. Henriksen T.B., Hedegaard M., Secher N.J., International Journal of Epidemiology, Aug. 1994, Vol.23, No.4, p.764-774. 51 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1158.pdf

The analyses were restricted to 3503 respondents who worked at least 30 hours per week during the first trimester. The four job exposure categories were: relaxed jobs (low demands and high control), active jobs (high demands and high control), passive jobs (low demands and low control), and high-strain jobs (high demand and low control). The results showed that women with relaxed jobs had the lowest risk of small-for-gestational age (SGA) and preterm delivery. Compared to this group the odds ratio (OR) for SGA delivery among women with passive jobs was 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9-1.9), with high-strain jobs 1.1 (95% CI: 0.7-1.6), and with active jobs 1.1 (95% CI: 0.8-1.7). Compared to women with relaxed jobs, the OR for preterm delivery among women with passive jobs was 1.4 (95% CI: 0.8-2.3), high-strain jobs 1.3 (95% CI: 0.7- 2.2) and active jobs 1.2 (95% CI: 0.7-2.2). All risks were consistently increased in women with low job control. (66631)

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CIS 96-1159 Psychological reactions during polar expeditions and isolation in hyperbaric chambers. Sandal G.M., Vaernes R., Bergan T., Warncke M., Ursin H., Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Mar. 1996, Vol.67, No.3, p.227-234. 27 ref. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1159.pdf

Psychological data from environments that are considered as analogous to space were collected from 67 subjects: 18 in hyperbaric chambers, 15 in polar expeditions, and 34 on Arctic stations. Psychological reactions to the environments were assessed by a questionnaire at weekly intervals. Reactions followed patterns that were specific to the type of environment and were independent of the duration of isolation. Certain personalities showed superior adaptation in hyperbaric chambers. The data suggest that while no one model covers all aspects of the space environment, these terrestrial settings may be considered as models for different aspects of life in space. (66680)

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CIS 96-1160 Behaviour and difficulties of drug addicts in the context of workplace safety. (Italian: Attegiamenti e difficoltà del tossicodipendente in materia di sicurezza sul lavoro) Fanelli C., Floccia G.M., Macciocu L., Prevenzione oggi, July-Sep.1992, Vol.4, No.3, p.129-147. 69 ref. (In Italian)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1160.pdf

The results of 120 returns to a questionnaire survey are reported with the aim of gathering and evaluating data on the influence of drug abuse on occupational safety. The questionnaires compiled by health and social workers contained their opinions on drug abuse from a general point of view and on the suitability, reliability and safety of employing drug addicts in the workplace. The reported results seem to indicate a negative influence of drug abuse. The unreliability of drug addicts and their accident propensity are attributed to their inability and difficulty to concentrate on their work. (66920)

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CIS 96-1161 Violence at work. Rowbotham M., Safeguard, Mar.-Apr. 1996, No.36, p.28-32. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1161.pdf

The issue of violence at work is examined. Topics discussed include types of violent behaviour (physical force, intimidation, verbal abuse) and situations where they are likely to occur, costs to the employer, preventive measures based on eliminating the opportunity for violence, legal duties of employers, safety requirements for workers in isolation, and the need to record and report incidents. It is concluded that prevention strategies should be applied to all occupations, not just those perceived as being at high risk. Concerns of the Service Workers' Union are also presented. (66937)

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CIS 96-1162 The influence of alcohol on industrial accidents in the Czech Republic. Paleček M., International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 1995, Vol.1, No.3, p.304-307. (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1162.pdf

Data on fatal industrial accidents caused by alcohol in the Czech Republic are analyzed for the years 1983 to 1993. Over this period the frequency of these accidents decreased by 60% from the maximum (20) in 1983. The relative frequency per 100,000 workers decreased by almost 53% and the share of these accidents in the overall number of fatal industrial accidents decreased by almost 35%. More than 97% of accidents occurred in 10 economic sectors; 71% in the processing industries, agriculture and forestry, and construction. The main causes of accidents were falls, trapping, hitting, crashes and explosions. (66364)

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CIS 96-1163 Beyond biomechanics - Psychosocial aspects of musculoskeletal disorders in office work. Mood S.D., Sauter S.L., eds., Taylor and Francis, Rankine Road, Basingstoke, Hampshire, RG24 8PR, United Kingdom, 1996. xix, 313p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Index. Price: GBP 22.00., ISBN 0-7484-0322-1 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1163.pdf

This book comprises a series of papers concerning the interaction between psychosocial and physical factors in the occurrence of musculoskeletal diseases in office work. Theoretical models and mechanisms are presented and issues for management, prevention and further research are discussed. Papers include: an ecological model of musculoskeletal disorders in office work; work organization, stress and cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs); effects of psychological demand and stress on neuromuscular function; pathophysiology of CTDs; a psychosocial view of cumulative trauma disorders and implications for occupational health and prevention; a cognitive-behavioural perspective on pain in CTDs; workstyle and the prevention, evaluation and rehabilitation of upper-extremity disorders; psychosocial epidemiology in CTD research. (66465)

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CIS 96-1164 Attitude of workers towards safety. (Portuguese: Atitude dos trabalhadores em relação à segurança) Faria M.G.L., Instituto de Desenvolvimento e Inspecção das Condições de Trabalho, Pr. de Alvalade 1, 1700 Lisboa, Portugal, 1996. 57p., ISBN 972-704-131-0 (In Portuguese)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1164.pdf

Study based on the answers to a 30-question questionnaire survey returned by 251 literate male workers in various industries in Portugal. The survey approached safety attitudes from 6 points of view: confidence, fatalism, lack of realism, active participation, indifference, conformity. The main conclusion is that older workers and workers with low educational attainment tend to score lower on safety attitudes: they have less willingness to participate in safety-related activities and show more indifference and conformity. The questionnaire is reproduced in full in the Annex. (66656)

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CIS 96-1165 Health psychology: Stress, behaviour and disease. Carroll D., The Falmer Press, 4 John Street, London WC1N 2ET, United Kingdom, 1992 (reprinted 1995). viii, 129p. 248 ref. Index. Price: GBP 12.50., ISBN 1-85000-842-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1165.pdf

Contents of this textbook: introduction to stress, behaviour and disease; type A behaviour and coronary heart disease; hypertension and cardiovascular reactions to stress; cancer and the immune system; the challenge of AIDS; stress management and reducing the risk of coronary heart disease; exercise, fitness and health; following therapeutic advice; pain and psychological approaches to its management; sex differences, race, social class and health. (66765)

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CIS 96-1166 Stress, coping, and health - A situation-behaviour approach: Theory, methods, applications. Perrez M., Reicherts M., Hogrefe & Huber Publishers, P.O. Box 2487, Kirkland, WA 98083-2487, USA, 1992. vi, 233p. 216 ref. Index. Price: USD 24.00., ISBN 0-88937-065-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1166.pdf

Part I of this textbook presents a theoretical framework for a situation-behaviour approach to stress and coping. Part II describes new approaches to the assessment of stress and coping: a stimulus-response questionnaire; the impact of situation and process on stress and coping; a computer-assisted self-observation system; prediction of stress and coping in the natural setting. Part III describes applications in clinical and health psychology: depressed people coping with aversive situations and with loss and failure; HIV-infection and stress; mental health and coping with everyday stressors; work stress in medical care units; adequate coping behaviour. (66766)

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CIS 96-1167 Analysing stress in offshore survival course trainees. Harris R.A., Coleshaw S.R.K., MacKenzie I.G., Health and Safety Executive (HSE), HSE Books, P.O. Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 6FS, United Kingdom, 1996. xiv, 127p. Illus. Bibl.ref. Price: GBP 30.00, ISBN 0-7176-1089-6 (In English)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1167.pdf

Physiological and psychological measurements, chosen as indicators of stress, were made on individuals undergoing offshore survival training, concentrating on practical exercises. Their emotional reactions were assessed by various questionnaires filled in by the trainees themselves. Most of them were especially anxious at the start of the course: helicopter underwater escape training was perceived to be the most difficult exercise. Particular problems were found to be also associated with fire training. Possible means of alleviating these issues are discussed. Older refreshers were found to be less anxious, probably as a result of experience. (66922)

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CIS 96-1168 Protection of industrial sites against terrorism. (French: Protection des établissements industriels contre le terrorisme) Damel R., CNPP, La Médiathèque du Risque, 5, rue Daunou, 75002 Paris, France, no date. 80p. Price: FRF 185.00. ### (In French)

Main contents: methodology for the assessment of the vulnerability of an industrial site; objectives; protection resources; general information on the industrial site; risk analysis; materials; uses; manufacturing and storage; other activities; buildings; vital centers of the site; dangerous areas; risk hierarchy; analysis of protection means; vulnerability of the industrial site. (67030)

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CIS 96-1169 Types of social balance indicators in enterprises. (Spanish: Tipos de indicadores para el balance social de la empresa) Gil Fisa A., Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, Ediciones y Publicaciones, c/Torrelaguna 73, 28027 Madrid, Spain, 1993. 8p. 6 ref. (In Spanish)

Internet:
http://www.ilo.org/intranet/english/protection/safework/cis/database/orig/1996/96-1169.pdf

This information note presents criteria for the formulation of social balance indicators in enterprises, which could be used in occupational risk prevention programmes. Aspects covered are: employment, remuneration, occupational safety and health, work organization, human resources, environment and social action programme. Tables illustrate the discussion. (66715)

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CIS 96-1170 Practical guide to industrial safety. (French: Guide pratique de sûreté industrielle) Demmer G., CNPP, La Médiathèque du Risque, 5, rue Daunou, 75002 Paris, France, no date. 140p. Price: FRF 185.00. ### (In French)

Main contents of this practical guide: principles of information protection; implementation of a system of information protection; prevention of manager abduction; provisions relating to bomb attack or social demonstrations; supervision personnel; interministerial instructions on the protection of the scientific and technical heritage; control of pedestrian access or vehicle access; internal regulations and safety procedures applicable to visitors and trainees; protection of information systems; crisis plan. (67029)

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Page generated from the CISDOC database. Date: 15.08.20.