ILO in the Arab States

The ILO Regional Office for Arab States promotes decent work in the Levant and the Gulf, covering 11 countries: Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, UAE, Oman, Qatar and Bahrain. ILO activities in the occupied Palestinian territory are also part of the Regional Office portfolio.

What's new

  1. ILO and UAE Agreement

    ILO and UAE agree on capacity building programme for the MoL to govern its labour market and monitor working conditions

    20 April 2015

    The two-year project will improve the UAE’s capacity to govern its labour market and monitor working conditions, including those of migrant workers.

  2. Arab Labour Conference

    ILO Director-General: Creating jobs key to stability in the Arab region

    20 April 2015

    In his address to the Arab Labour Organization’s 42nd Conference, International Labour Organization Director-General Guy Ryder urged the region’s leaders to tackle unemployment, respond to globalization challenges, strengthen the private sector and engage in effective social dialogue.

  3. Arab Labour Conference

    ILO Director-General to open Arab Labour Conference in Kuwait

    18 April 2015

    Guy Ryder to address the opening of the 42nd session of the Arab Labour Conference.

Publications

  1. Demographic and Labour Market Trends in Yemen

    A background paper to frame the interface between the youth employment challenge and the national migration policy.

  2. Manual on Skills Testing and Certification: Jordan

    This manual contains the minimum requirements for skills testing and certification processes in Jordan. It does not constitute an academic curriculum on assessment methods but is expected to be used as a core reference by test developers and assessors and all those concerned with skills testing in the country, at least for the first three occupational levels.

  3. Labour inspection in Arab states: progress and challenges

    This is a comparative overview of labour inspection systems in selected Arab countries. It compiles available information on practices and areas of progress. It also highlights major knowledge gaps and areas where improvement is needed in ensuring effective and modern labour administration and inspection systems.